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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1267816166


From: David Faux <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Danish "homeland" of Viking Era emigrants to EasternEngland and Normandy
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2010 11:09:26 -0800
References: <ea3bd9561003021130r7ce1e8c0na0195ecbc243dd3f@mail.gmail.com><SNT131-w18ED8CB2E907B9C7D4B841BC3B0@phx.gbl><ea3bd9561003030920r426ea707rf9476b9408f21eba@mail.gmail.com><SNT131-w557250FD0A4619BE46234ABC3A0@phx.gbl>
In-Reply-To: <SNT131-w557250FD0A4619BE46234ABC3A0@phx.gbl>


Tom,

Despite the extremely low sample sizes in the Myres study, Vince Vizachero
identified Austria as a U106 "hotspot" and created a contour map to reflect
this finding. I believe that his work was reported to dna-forums.
Relatively little R-U152 has been reported from Austria, but once again we
run into the problem that so few from that country have tested commercially
that saying a great deal about the subject becomes quite conjectural -
although sensible hypotheses can be generated for testing.

David K. Faux.

On Wed, Mar 3, 2010 at 12:45 PM, Tom Gull <> wrote:

>
> That is the paper relating to Alpine Austria but it actually had a larger
> sample than the one I thought I was referencing <g>. I was talking about
> Myles et al that showed a similar value for Austria without pinning any
> location. It had the low Ns close to the Danish data you were sharing. They
> were roundly discounted by everyone who believed the only possible hotspot
> for U106 was the Netherlands, and specifically discounted because the sample
> was so small. Having the Neiderstatter study show about the same U106
> percentage was a surprise to many because they had discounted the earlier
> study. Of course, a real in-depth study would be needed to confirm either or
> both of the prior ones.
>
>
>


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