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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1268348208


From: Aaron Hill <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Genome work ushers in new genetic era
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 2010 14:56:48 -0800
References: <820524.38859.qm@web31507.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
In-Reply-To: <820524.38859.qm@web31507.mail.mud.yahoo.com>


It is pretty clear to me. 200 is the old news. 30 is what the latest
research indicates.

>From the BusinessWeek piece:

"Children inherit fewer gene mutations from their parents than was
previously thought...."

"The mutation rate was less than half of what we'd thought." — Lynn B.
Jorde, professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine

"The actual rate of gene mutations each parent gives a child will vary
depending on the age of the parents (particularly the father) when a child
is conceived."



On Wed, Mar 10, 2010 at 8:59 PM, Jonathan Day <> wrote:

> Ok, I m officially confused. (Read: in my normal state of mind.) I ve seen
> claims that there were an average of 200 mutations per chromosome, which
> would make it impossible for there to be 30 mutations per parent unless the
> research I saw involved very unusual family dynamics. Or was wrong, or I m
> not understanding this new finding. Anyone got a better understanding of the
> data?
>
> On Wed Mar 10th, 2010 7:06 PM PST Aaron Hill wrote:
>
> >Entire Family Genome Sequenced for First Time
> >Children receive 30 mutations from each parent, researchers find
> >
> >http://www.businessweek.com/lifestyle/content/healthday/636874.html



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