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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1268363289


From: David Faux <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Genome work ushers in new genetic era- how can we minenew data?
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 2010 19:08:09 -0800
References: <820524.38859.qm@web31507.mail.mud.yahoo.com><3480483d1003111516m21fc9650j471e81b2393618ac@mail.gmail.com><6086D865ECC142D08C3655B4A6581FD5@john><792174.52375.qm@web81705.mail.mud.yahoo.com><REME20100311213121@alum.mit.edu>
In-Reply-To: <REME20100311213121@alum.mit.edu>


Ascertainment bias may mean that the available SNPs do not adequately
reflect the world''s diversity.

David K. Faux.

On Thu, Mar 11, 2010 at 6:32 PM, John Chandler
<>wrote:

> Wayne wrote:
> > Come up with a way for 23andMe to release all of their y chromosome
> > data in order for it to be scanned for new SNPs.
>
> 23andMe doesn't do sequencing, just probing of a specific list of
> already known and already studied SNPs. For the Y chromosome, I count
> just 1921 SNPs reported. If we assume that they have tested 15,000
> customers with Y chromosomes, the total output is only about equal to
> the total number of sequenced bases in one Y chromosome. That means
> there should be only a handful of novel, parallel mutations in the
> whole lot. I don't know what the error rate is for their testing,
> but I fear there might well be a similar handful of errors among so
> many tests.
>
> John Chandler
>
>
>


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