GENEALOGY-DNA-L Archives

Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1268370379


From: (John Chandler)
Subject: Re: [DNA] Genome work ushers in new genetic era- how can wemine new data?
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 00:06:19 -0500
References: <820524.38859.qm@web31507.mail.mud.yahoo.com><3480483d1003111516m21fc9650j471e81b2393618ac@mail.gmail.com><6086D865ECC142D08C3655B4A6581FD5@john><792174.52375.qm@web81705.mail.mud.yahoo.com><REME20100311213121@alum.mit.edu><ea3bd9561003111908o1d12dd9te0b487249107be6a@mail.gmail.com>
In-Reply-To: <ea3bd9561003111908o1d12dd9te0b487249107be6a@mail.gmail.com>(message from David Faux on Thu, 11 Mar 2010 19:08:09 -0800)


David wrote:
> Ascertainment bias may mean that the available SNPs do not adequately
> reflect the world''s diversity.

It is reasonable to assume that every one of the 1921 SNPs tested
is "diverse" in the world -- in the sense that there must be dozens
or even hundreds of living individuals who have novel mutations on
a given locus. That just comes from the simple arithmetic of
multiplying the world population by the mutation rate. The problem
is that these "de novo" mutations are as private as they can be,
and the vast majority of other, slightly less novel mutations are
still quite private.

John Chandler


This thread: