GENEALOGY-DNA-L Archives

Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1268402586


From: "Diana Gale Matthiesen" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Clades, Definitions, Discoveries, FTDNA
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 09:03:06 -0500
References: <376447.73467.qm@web25904.mail.ukl.yahoo.com><4B992A34.6060104@san.rr.com><FCA563F0-DD03-4B1E-A5ED-D1751792324B@vizachero.com><00e201cac145$82fec7c0$5e82af48@Ken1><59b150b1003111148g536d80e5he4ebb561c9048fc0@mail.gmail.com><017901cac159$4e6c7020$5e82af48@Ken1><086F1093A566477B815995B401BB889C@HP><ea3bd9561003111750t7bbdcadamec3d140afb5b7680@mail.gmail.com>
In-Reply-To: <ea3bd9561003111750t7bbdcadamec3d140afb5b7680@mail.gmail.com>


I stand corrected.

> -----Original Message-----
> From: On Behalf Of David Faux
> Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2010 8:51 PM
> To:
> Subject: Re: [DNA] Clades, Definitions, Discoveries, FTDNA
>
> That is not correct actually. Hobbiests have been in the
> forefront of SNP
> discovery. Just using my own haplogroup, first a hobbiest
> brought what came
> to be S28 / U152 and S21 / U106 as well as S29 to the attention of Jim
> Wilson and others by sifting through the Perlgen dataset.
> Then S139 / L2
> and and S144 / L20 emerged via sharp eyed hobbiests looking
> at the raw data
> from 23andMe as presented in Adriano Squecco's charts. Who
> knows how long
> it would have been if we had relied on the efforts of
> academic population
> geneticists most of whom are still publishing data no more
> deeply genotyped
> than M269 - universal to all of the above. This is the tip
> of the iceberg
> of discovery in the past 4 years. Where were the "pros" during this
> interval - how many SNPs can they claim to have discovered -
> a paltry few by
> comparison.
>
> David. K. Faux.
>
> On Thu, Mar 11, 2010 at 5:36 PM, Diana Gale Matthiesen
> <>wrote:
>
> > Yes, haplogroups are defined because haplogroups are
> clades, and clades are
> > defined, not discovered. They're defined by the researcher
> building the
> > cladogram who decides on the traits to be included and
> makes the polarity
> > determinations for those traits. It's SNPs that are
> discovered, and I'm
> > not
> > aware of any "hobbyist" ever discovering one.
> >
> >


This thread: