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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1268413885


From: Vincent Vizachero <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Genome work ushers in new genetic era- how can wemine new data?
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 12:11:25 -0500
References: <820524.38859.qm@web31507.mail.mud.yahoo.com><3480483d1003111516m21fc9650j471e81b2393618ac@mail.gmail.com><6086D865ECC142D08C3655B4A6581FD5@john><792174.52375.qm@web81705.mail.mud.yahoo.com><REME20100311213121@alum.mit.edu>
In-Reply-To: <REME20100311213121@alum.mit.edu>


I'm not sure, but I think the original point of this thread was that
if those 15,000 Y-SNP panels at 23andMe were mined by someone who knew
what they were doing and cared that more than a handful of those 1921
Y-SNPs would be revealed to be phylogenetically useful.

Although a few hundred customers have publicly shared their raw data,
the absolute number who are M269- is very small. Contained within the
23andMe database, I presume, are least a couple hundred folks from A,
B, C, D, L, M, N, O, P, K, T, etc. whose results would be helpful. If
we had raw data from a dozen people from each of those groups, I guess
we could put at least a couple new SNPs on the ISOGG tree.

VV


On Mar 11, 2010, at 9:32 PM, John Chandler wrote:

> That means
> there should be only a handful of novel, parallel mutations in the
> whol


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