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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1268424920


From: Charles Hollenbeck <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Genome work ushers in new genetic era- how can we minenew data?
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 12:15:20 -0800
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Sandy,

I should think that a comparison of the brother's results would give us a
handle on how
many mutations (SNPs) occur on the Y-chromosome (or any other chromosome) in
a
generation. A comparison with a very, very distant relative should support
(or not) the
observed mutation rate.

Charlie

On Fri, Mar 12, 2010 at 2:49 AM, Sandy Paterson <
> wrote:

> John (or anyone),
>
> A question to do with full genomes :
>
> Suppose two brothers were to have full genome tests. Suppose further that
> the two brothers shared a common ancestor with a third person, the common
> ancestor having lived around 1300AD say.
>
> What would one hope (best case scenario) to find?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Sandy
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From:
> [mailto:] On Behalf Of John Chandler
> Sent: 12 March 2010 02:32
> To:
> Subject: Re: [DNA] Genome work ushers in new genetic era- how can we mine
> new data?
>
> Wayne wrote:
>
>
>
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