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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1268430265


From: Vincent Vizachero <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Genome work ushers in new genetic era- how can wemine new data?
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 16:44:25 -0500
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If you speaking about the Y chromosome, the answer is that we'd expect
the two brothers should be virtually identical. By that, I mean that
they might genuinely differ at about five sites or so on average,
though any pair of brothers could be more or less than that.

Given the current state of technology, you'd probably have an order of
magnitude more errors in the sequence than actual differences.

VV


On Mar 12, 2010, at 3:46 PM, Sandy Paterson wrote:

> If the full genomes of 2 brothers were compared, would they have the
> same
> SNP's?


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