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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1268430373


From: Tim Wilder <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Question about matches on Chromo #7 at 23andme RF
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 15:46:13 -0600
References: <mailman.2879.1268427645.12642.genealogy-dna@rootsweb.com>
In-Reply-To: <mailman.2879.1268427645.12642.genealogy-dna@rootsweb.com>


From looking at Adriano's spreadsheet of the Y results, it looks to me
like you can get clumps of no-calls. Maybe that is because the Y is so
difficult.

On 3/12/2010 3:00 PM, wrote:
> Message: 10
> Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 15:53:42 EST
> From:
> Subject: Re: [DNA] Question about matches on Chromo #7 at 23andme RF
> To:
> Message-ID:<>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
>
> Yes, the assumption is that no-calls would have matched. They're sprinkled
> here and there, each one surrounded by dozens to hundreds or even thousands
> of good calls. It's certainly possible that ignoring a no-call would
> artificially extend the long run of consecutive half-identical SNPs by one more
> SNP. However, the exact boundaries are already fuzzy, since a half-identical
> region could be extended by inheriting an allele from the other parent that
> makes it*appear* that the run is continuing. The only pattern that
> unequivocally terminates the run is an "opposite homozygote" (e.g. AA in one person
> and GG in the other person).
>
> Ann Turner
>
>



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