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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1268467214


From: Vincent Vizachero <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Genome work ushers in new genetic era- how canwe mine new data?
Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2010 03:00:14 -0500
References: <820524.38859.qm@web31507.mail.mud.yahoo.com> <3480483d1003111516m21fc9650j471e81b2393618ac@mail.gmail.com> <6086D865ECC142D08C3655B4A6581FD5@john> <792174.52375.qm@web81705.mail.mud.yahoo.com> <REME20100311213121@alum.mit.edu> <000001cac1d1$b3b723d0$1b256b70$@com> <65a020c81003121215t64ca2712ofe3045890c788e80@mail.gmail.com> <000001cac225$2795aee0$76c10ca0$@com><A9A083B5-E48B-4D5F-98B8-AD77F43503E6@vizachero.com><00cc01cac280$759a2840$60ce78c0$@com>
In-Reply-To: <00cc01cac280$759a2840$60ce78c0$@com>


Of course, the paper trail doesn't affect the DNA. The Y-chromosomes
will be what they are, regardless of whether the paper trail is weak
or strong.

But I think your real question concerns what we expect to find in two
people with a recent MRCA. Specifically, their Y chromosomes will be
virtually identical. And ALL differences between two Y chromsomes
must have to have happened after their MRCA, so I think the answer to
your question as you asked it is ""yes".

VV


On Mar 13, 2010, at 2:40 AM, Sandy Paterson wrote:

> So if two people have an iron-clad paper trail that links them to a
> common
> ancestor say around 1300AD, we can assume that any major differences
> in
> their Y chromosome SNP's must have occurred after 1300AD?


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