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From: Sean Silver <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Age of R1b Cohane
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 2010 00:20:27 -0400
References: <mailman.3487.1268623154.12642.genealogy-dna@rootsweb.com>
In-Reply-To: <mailman.3487.1268623154.12642.genealogy-dna@rootsweb.com>


All individuals in this project are in fact Jewish and have an oral tradition (and genealogical evidence) of being Cohanim and they have no prior knowledge of their R1b haplogroup prior to testing.



As I noted, none of these individuals have any British or Irish matches beyond Y-12, thus demonstrating the false positive matches due to a believed-to-be DYS 393=12 mutation within the British Isles which is distinctly separate from the confirmed Eastern R1b (colloquially called ht35). All matches beyond Y-12 are not only Jewish, but all have the same oral tradition of being Cohanim.





Message: 8
Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2010 23:11:49 EDT
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Subject: [DNA] Age of R1b Cohane
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In a message dated 3/13/2010 1:08:42 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
Sean writes:

"This is also only a computation of the R1b Cohane line (all ht35), and
doesn't take into account the other ht35 R1bs in the R1b Jewish project.
These other R1bs will have a greater genetic distance as the closest
matches to the Cohanim are all in the R1b Cohane project."


---------

<I haven't followed this thread too closely, but the surname COHAN caught
my attention . One thing to bear in mind is that this spelling, COEN,
COAN, <COHANE,. as well as COHAN (as in George M. COHAN) can be and, in my
experience usually are, Irish and not Jewish. Though uncommon, the <spelling
COEN seems to be used more often in Co. Galway. Another more common
variant, KEOHANE, seems to be used in southern Munster, <especially Co. Cork
. .

<If the persons interested in this project are indeed of known Jewish
origin, so be it. But as Y-DNA tells us, identical surnames do not <mean
identical lineage. If haplotypes appear that seem Irish then that is probably
the answer in those particular cases.

Len





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