GENEALOGY-DNA-L Archives

Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1268772004


From: peter spencer <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] S28 SNP - The ''Latin'' R1b
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2010 15:40:04 -0500
References: <6b9219061003152354w325cc88o27b320f916a89043@mail.gmail.com><797E5C7F-68F5-47A7-99D9-F3847F3A44B6@vizachero.com><6b9219061003161243o58dabf83k6776113415925807@mail.gmail.com><32BF0068-833E-4D0C-A40B-D7F812674BD9@vizachero.com>
In-Reply-To: <32BF0068-833E-4D0C-A40B-D7F812674BD9@vizachero.com>


I dont think Im arguing for anything like that overall pct of roman-era
introgression into the modern welsh Y-makeup.
I am not using eupedia to prove anything other than a clear citation that
the remainder of the modern Italian Y pool is cetainly also accounted for in
modern Wales.

Your own siteit appears -
http://italydna.blogspot.com/

gives the modern Italian E3b percentage as approx 13% of the overall
population, included all 3 major clades.
your J pct, is given overall as 25% for the modern italian population- this
likely includes substantial semitic components (rome and along with the asia
minor hellenic communities both had Jewish commmunities larger than the
Levant itself at this time)

So, the concern of providing for a equal introgression of J into
non-urbanized, backwater Roman colonies in this era may well be moot point,
as the degree to which the semitic communities were serving in expeditionary
military capacities is very questionable. In all likelyhood, these
populations were still acting as a religious community within the Roman
state, and as traders, in urbanized settlements, just as they were attracted
to rome and the asia minor cosmopolitan communities during these
centuries..

----------------------------------------------------------------

On Tue, Mar 16, 2010 at 3:03 PM, Vincent Vizachero <>wrote:

> You can check your sources, but if your theory were correct then there
> would be just as much E1b and more J in Wales than R-U152.
>
> The data I've got tell me that just isn't so.
>
> Could this hamlet or that one have high levels of E, due to drift and
> or founder effects? Sure. But if you are seriously trying to convince
> us that half of Welshmen have a Roman direct y-line ancestor then
> you'll need a better source than Eupedia to do it.
>
> VV
>
>
> On Mar 16, 2010, at 3:43 PM, peter spencer wrote:
>
> > Its there. Notice it is also in the north wales region of Angelsley
> > that was
> > so impacted/targeted by the Roman Occupation/Colonisation.
>
>
> -------------------------------
> To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to
> with the word 'unsubscribe' without the
> quotes in the subject and the body of the message
>


This thread: