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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1268858919


From: peter spencer <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] S28 SNP - The ''Latin'' R1b
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2010 15:48:39 -0500
References: <6b9219061003152354w325cc88o27b320f916a89043@mail.gmail.com><797E5C7F-68F5-47A7-99D9-F3847F3A44B6@vizachero.com><6b9219061003161243o58dabf83k6776113415925807@mail.gmail.com><32BF0068-833E-4D0C-A40B-D7F812674BD9@vizachero.com><6b9219061003161340w1c820404xf01868b129f98780@mail.gmail.com><B466FF06-7C21-4F6C-ABED-3B0DE1931436@vizachero.com>
In-Reply-To: <B466FF06-7C21-4F6C-ABED-3B0DE1931436@vizachero.com>


Vincent-
I mean this in the most jovial of suggestions,
but I think you are constructing straw men and then ferociously mauling
them..

If as you say, the U-152 is a latent strain found in the remote isles prior
to the roman era, then why is its also at greatest strength per pct of the
population, in other regions long under the dominion of roman occupation,
while as in the Isles, basically absent from regions not subjected to forced
settlement in roman administered towns/villages?

The reverse certainly could also be true, that as David Faux seems to assert
Lombardic settlement in Italy accounts for the S28 prominence within Italy,
usurping the local male lineage to some extent..
but I am personally not of that opinion for a variety of reasons.

As to your caution against daring to examine momentarily the potential for
the Roman era Y-mosaic to differ from modern Italian regional distribution..
I cannot emphasis enough that it would be quite foolish indeed to find
comfort in a assumption that the Roman or Etruscan era regional distribution
largely mirrored todays.

The only thing more foolish would be a assumption that more than a inkling
of that potential difference can be asserted factually at this point.



On Tue, Mar 16, 2010 at 5:36 PM, Vincent Vizachero <>wrote:

> If your argument is that Italians are the exclusive or primary source
> for the 15% of Wales that is (according to you) R-U152, while R-U152
> is only 20% in Italians, then you are indeed arguing for a fairly
> massive population replacement.
>
> And if you then argue that the Roman haplogroup distribution was
> nothing like the Italian distribution, well then you're just making
> the whole theory up out of nothing.
>
> VV
>
>
> On Mar 16, 2010, at 4:40 PM, peter spencer wrote:
>
> > I dont think Im arguing for anything like that overall pct of roman-
> > era
> > introgression into the modern welsh Y-makeup.
>
>
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