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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1268866663


From: Vincent Vizachero <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] OT How many races are there?
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2010 18:57:43 -0400
References: <9e2b1.3875d76e.38d2394b@aol.com><BLU126-DS15F1457F7750EB09BF7863922C0@phx.gbl><420D34E2-29D8-434D-874C-09388BE92820@vizachero.com><BLU126-DS13D4450536247AD6B9EDAB922C0@phx.gbl><9AA83833-1542-4CAA-8890-D1E7CEC502F0@vizachero.com><BLU126-DS98CC041823D99F3659EDB922C0@phx.gbl><9A7CE59D-6E0D-42E1-BC02-7A97EC73E6B6@vizachero.com><BLU126-DS1798500A32C7DC6F120A79922C0@phx.gbl>
In-Reply-To: <BLU126-DS1798500A32C7DC6F120A79922C0@phx.gbl>


On Mar 17, 2010, at 6:38 PM, Raymond Whritenour wrote:

> Then why haven't these readily made distinctions been translated
> into biogeographical tests?

The answer can only be that the people offering the tests are happy
doing it the way they are doing it. Or can't figure out how to do it
differently.

I've seen my own raw data from 23andMe analyzed in a BGA test on up to
seven "source" groups by a member of this list, so I know it can be
done. And I understand the process well enough to know that there is
no theoretical limit to k in these tests. This flows from the fact
that human genetic variation is clinal, so any formulation of
"clusters" or "races" is inarguably arbitrary.

Sorry.

VV


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