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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1269038569


From: argiedude <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Map of Indian haplogroups in Indonesia
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 2010 19:42:49 -0300
References: <BAY128-W29D7961D886B2561B0EA2BC82C0@phx.gbl>,<BAY128-W1872C5C2F2F332BC5258DC82A0@phx.gbl>,<CA999B8C-0C33-41E5-92FF-ED3AE3B88F64@vizachero.com>,<BAY128-W22293A1EE48092195868B8C82A0@phx.gbl>,<f3f05ce81003190622v249372as95c6357e89b3657b@mail.gmail.com>
In-Reply-To: <f3f05ce81003190622v249372as95c6357e89b3657b@mail.gmail.com>


In Semino's 2004 study of y-dna J, she found 700 samples that belonged to J (12f2.1), and all of them fell into either J1 or J2. This study of Indonesia found 3 samples of J(xJ1,J2) out of 18 total J samples. That's an almost impossible likelihood. Semino's study included 37 J samples from the Indian subcontinent (and of course, none of them were J*).

>
> On Fri, Mar 19, 2010 at 4:01 AM, argiedude <> wrote:
> > You're also forgetting about the 3 samples of J*, which are even harder to explain, as a historic event, than R1b1*.
>
> Why more difficult? There were plenty of Arab visits to Indonesia.
>


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