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From: "Sandy Paterson" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Questions about alternate means of searching DNA Genealogy
Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2010 09:25:05 +0100
References: <209bca921003291224k5f0b3ae2gef0ece518f0327f1@mail.gmail.com><REME20100329212910@alum.mit.edu>
In-Reply-To: <REME20100329212910@alum.mit.edu>


John,

You wrote

"The Y chromosome is passed on as a whole, and it could well be the same 1%
of the male population that has all three of those rare alleles together."

Really? I suppose it's possible, but I'd say it's highly unlikely. Perhaps
you can offer an example?

Sandy



-----Original Message-----
From:
[mailto:] On Behalf Of John Chandler
Sent: 30 March 2010 02:31
To:
Subject: Re: [DNA] Questions about alternate means of searching DNA
Genealogy

John wrote:
> I have 3 distinct markers in my first 24 marker set that happen in less
than
> 1 percent of the population (according to SMGF). Whenever I can find a
match
> (If that's possible), it should be very easy to prove a match as my genes
> are so odd.

Not necessarily. The Y chromosome is passed on as a whole, and it could
well be the same 1% of the male population that has all three of those
rare alleles together. Having *anything* rare is a plus, but having
three rare alleles isn't necessarily "three times as good". You would
have to look at the correlation statistics to find out.

John Chandler




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