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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1270048262


From: Tim <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] When? Addition of new SNPs to Advanced menu and,draft haplotree
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2010 10:17:26 -0500
References: <mailman.447.1270018845.29767.genealogy-dna@rootsweb.com>
In-Reply-To: <mailman.447.1270018845.29767.genealogy-dna@rootsweb.com>


I see the situation somewhat differently.

FTDNA was finding some SNPs, but the second step, just as important but
not part of Walk the Y, is for project administrators to look at the
STRs for the people with those SNPs and identify others within the
particular projects who should test for them, and then recruit testers.
Otherwise we just stay at the point of "here is one guy with a SNP, so
what?".

In some cases this extra effort by some project administrators happened,
in others not. Part of the problem is that when FTDNA offers an advanced
test, they don't give an STR modal for who is likely to have the SNP.
Maybe it would be too confusing to people if they did, but there has to
be some guidance by someone about who should test for what.

> Message: 7
> Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2010 16:30:06 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Jonathan Day<>
> Subject: Re: [DNA] When? Addition of new SNPs to Advanced menu and
> drafthaplotree
> To: ,
> Message-ID:<>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
>
> Dunno about the original poster, but I'm inclined to think WTY has been forgotten. It was horribly expensive, wasn't finding a huge number of SNPs, and really needed some substantial outside sponsorship.
>
> As I recall, interest in WTY seemed to fade when interest in the X chromosome picked up, and appeared to die off entirely with Family Finder.
>
> (I'm still not sure what Family Finder actually finds that's useful. If it's only good for 5 generations, most genealogy websites do as well or better and there are genealogical supply stores that can provide databases that'll take you back to the 1500s. The truly interesting DNA cases are the ones which are difficult to trace through traditional methods, because there you should - eventually, as the genetic databases grow - be able to fill in gaps for which no paperwork exists.)


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