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From: Wayne Kauffman <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Picture of a SNP?
Date: Tue, 3 May 2011 09:51:42 -0700 (PDT)
References: <4DBF7BE1.1040604@jarman.net>,<781564FAD39749BDACF4B1DED086C56A@kenPC><COL116-W408C6A04A13170ACF61506E49E0@phx.gbl><A78C175A6C0C4A6293B2D715681568FA@kenPC><005401cc09af$6c9b36e0$45d1a4a0$@dgmweb.net>
In-Reply-To: <005401cc09af$6c9b36e0$45d1a4a0$@dgmweb.net>


Viewing single atoms has been occurring for several years. Scanning Tunneling
Microscopes were the starting point.
Image of the electron cloud around an atom :
http://www.mizozo.com/tech/09/2009/15/first-picture-of-an-atom.html
Photo of a single trapped atom:
http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2010-09/atomic-breakthroughs-help-scientists-slow-down-atoms-action


Wayne





________________________________
From: Diana Gale Matthiesen <>
To:
Sent: Tue, May 3, 2011 12:30:32 PM
Subject: Re: [DNA] Picture of a SNP?

An object has to be larger than the wavelength of the medium used to
detect it, or it will be "invisible" to that medium. Atoms and
molecules cannot be seen using visible light because they're smaller
than the wavelengths of visible light.

The DNA molecule is about 2.5 nm wide and its constituent atoms are
even smaller, while the wavelength of visible light is in the range of
390-750 nm. Atoms and molecules can be "detected" with higher
frequency (shorter wavelength) electromagnetic radiation, such as
X-rays, but the idea of ever "seeing" atoms or molecules is a
non-starter.

Diana


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