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Archiver > GLAMORGAN > 2002-04 > 1018810866


From: "Jill Muir" <>
Subject: RE: [GLA] interesting occupations + Nursery Rhymes
Date: Sun, 14 Apr 2002 20:05:09 +0100
In-Reply-To: <12b.fa60268.29eb0a5e@aol.com>


Hi there Elfi,
Nursery Rhymes interest me a lot. Of course, yours fits doesn't it? A bit
like Lace makers and their tells. One two Buckle my shoe, etc.,
Although going completely off subject, I thought others may be interested in
this:-
The simplest of tells took the bald dialogue form.

Knock, Knock at your door.,Who's there?,It's me. Come in. Does your little
dog bite? Yes. How many teeth has it? Six,seven next time Eight when I call
again.

This rhyme immediately reminded me of the Welsh verse taught to me by my
mother and grandmother, which is played by knocking at a child's forehead,
and peeping in the eyes, [by raising the eye-lid], lifting up the latch,
[tipping up the nose], Walk in [walking in the mouth] Take a chair, -
touching a cheek, Sit by there - touch the other cheek: Say 'How do you do
today ? [the child's name one is playing with] '. [Shake the child's chin]

Knock at the door, Peep in, Lift up the latch, Walk in, Take a chair,
Sit by there, Say 'How d'you do today Katie?'

Surely many Welsh children now adults know this most loved of verses?
Anyone else know the origin of a Nursery Rhyme?

Bye now,
Jill

Jill Muir, Oxfordshire, UK
Joint List Administrator for the Glamorgan Mailing List
Mailing list for family & local history in Glamorgan
Glamorgan FHS member # 449

-----Original Message-----
From: [mailto:]
Sent: Sunday, April 14, 2002 5:38 PM
To:
Subject: [GLA] interesting occupations

>My GGF's birth certificate (1852) gives the occupation of his father as a
"higler" (apparently also spelt 'higgler').<

When I was researching for my book on local history of Derbyshire, I came
across this occupation quite regularly.

He was a travelling salesman usually dodr-to-soor or a Pedlar.

Hope this helps

Judy in Derbyshire.

hello,
I thought that maybe Jill's first description of a higler sounded the
better. The old nursery rhyme. 'Higlety piglety my black hen, he lays eggs
for gentlemen, sometimes nine and sometimes ten, higlety piglety my black
hen'.
elfi


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