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Archiver > GenMassachusetts > 2010-05 > 1274998705


From: "Dale H. Cook" <>
Subject: Re: [GENMASSACHUSETTS] What was at 83 Newbury Street in 1909?(Boston)
Date: Thu, 27 May 2010 18:18:25 -0400
References: <AANLkTilWQqsxsoBZT9u4OIfCNZSHV7o_QYVuanP--XWH@mail.gmail.com>
In-Reply-To: <AANLkTilWQqsxsoBZT9u4OIfCNZSHV7o_QYVuanP--XWH@mail.gmail.com>


At 04:29 PM 5/27/2010, Allyssa Edwards wrote:

>How might I go about finding out what was at that address in the early
>1900s?

One useful reference is George W. and Walter S. Bromley, "Atlas of
the City of Boston" (Philadelphia: G. W. Bromley & Co., 1908). The
scans that I have (from the now-defunct USIGS site) are not of the
highest resolution, but it seems that in 1908, 83 Newbury St. was
occupied by the Technology Club. MIT's Walker and Rogers buildings
were then across the street - those and the original building of the
Boston Society of Natural History filled the block bounded by
Boylston, Newbury, Berkeley and Clarendon. In 1916 MIT moved to
Cambridge, and in 1939 the Rogers Building was torn down, replaced by
the New England Life Building (now the Newbry Building). The building
of the Natural History Museum (later the Museum of Science) was for
many years the location of the Boston Bonwit Teller store.

The Technology Club was a social center for MIT's then largely
commuter student body, and I think your Philip Hounsell was likely a
waiter there.

Dale H. Cook, Member, NEHGS and MA Society of Mayflower Descendants;
Plymouth Co. MA Coordinator for the USGenWeb Project
Administrator of http://plymouthcolony.net


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