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Archiver > HICKS > 2001-07 > 0994003364


From:
Subject: Hicks North Carolina Books
Date: Sun, 1 Jul 2001 12:02:44 EDT


Also there is the book The Hicks Family of Western North Carolina (Watauga
River Lines) by Mattie and Henry Hicks sold by Minor Printing of Boone, NC.

Put in "Robert Isbell" and any of the online book stores, they can help you.
These are the books (below) available still.

The Keepers: Mountain Folk Holding on to Old Skills & Talents
Trade Paperback, 129 Pages, Blair, John F. Publisher, May 1999
ISBN: 0895871807

Author: Isbell, Robert
Photographer: Tilley, Arthur

Subject / Style: Self-Actualization & Self-Help : Success, Social Sciences :
Sociology - Rural Description: Wayne Henderson, renowned luthier and guitar
picker, was at the White House accepting a National Heritage Award when he
encountered Bea Hensley, equally noted blacksmith. They quickly discovered
they had much in common. The irony was that they had lived their lives barely
seventy miles apart yet had to travel to the nation's capital to meet. The
mountainous border area shared by Virginia, North Carolina, and Tennessee is
rich in old-time masters like Henderson and Hensley, artisans who follow
techniques passed down over hundreds of years. The Keepers introduces a
cross-section of such people. Primitive artist Arlee Mains makes cornhusk
dolls, dreamcatchers, and oil paintings that sell faster than she can produce
them. The Spencers perform traditional music and show their dancing skills
somewhere in the mountains every week. Orville Hicks tells Jack Tales passed
down by famous relation Ray Hicks and generations of the Hicks clan. In a
time when the arts and crafts of the pioneers are often practiced in
imitation, the men and women in these pages keepers of the old ways honor the
teachings of their forbears. This is a glimpse into their lives.

The Last Chivaree: The Hicks Family of Beech Mountain
Hardcover, 192 Pages, University of North Carolina Press, May 1996
ISBN: 0807822663

Author: Isbell, Robert

Ray Hicks: Master Storyteller of the Blue Ridge
Trade Paperback, 192 Pages, University of North Carolina Press, April 2001
ISBN: 0807849626

Author: Isbell, Robert

Subject / Style: History : America (North, Central, South, West Indies)
Reviews: "A tender, loving, magical book." (Guy Munger, "Literary Lantern")
"A book to be savored and to remind us of a quieter and simpler way of life."
(North Carolina Libraries) "In this intriguing study of the Hicks family of
Beech Mountain, journalist Isbell provides excellent insight into the lives
of the people who live in the Appalachian mountains." (Library Journal) "Amid
the hardship, the Hicks family fashioned a life full of humor and amazement
for the natural gifts abundant on Beech Mountain. . . . [This book] captures
the essence of Ray Hicks's stories and the sound of Stanley Hicks's
dulcimer." (Asheville Citizen-Times)

About the Author: Robert Isbell, a former journalist and bank executive,
lives on Winyah Bay, near Georgetown, South Carolina, in winter and spends
the summers in Beech Mountain, North Carolina.

Description: Ray Hicks, 78, the famous teller of Appalachian Jack Tales, is
one of America's best-loved storytellers. In this book he shares a different
kind of story, a chronicle of his family's experiences in the remote section
of the North Carolina mountains where they have lived for more than 200
years. The pioneers who settled Beech Mountain were a God-fearing people who
cherished the stories, the songs, and the ways of their ancestors. For
generations, the Hickses have preserved tales of family history--the
struggles and the celebrations--right alongside tales of giants and magic
hens. Now readers will come to know the wisdom, humor, hardships, and dignity
of this remarkable clan. Robert Isbell's profile of Ray Hicks and his family
also pays tribute to the longstanding Appalachian traditions of music-making
and storytelling. First published in 1996 as The Last Chivaree, the book is
based on hundreds of hours of conversations and many years of friendship.





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