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Archiver > HOFMANN > 2001-11 > 1004719276


From: "Michael G. McManness" <>
Subject: [Hofmann] Urban Legends Reference Pages
Date: Fri, 2 Nov 2001 10:41:16 -0600


Hi Everyone,

This posting is a clarification about my prior e-Address & e-Inbox virus
protection message post. I apologize if anyone was mislead. My intention
was to remind everyone about the rash of new viruses that are spreading
like wild fire. The message was also intended to educate people about
viruses and how they work, provide some anti-virus urls & information and a
overview about a new method currently being used by people as an additional
virus tool.

My message stated: "There is no substitute for good anti-virus software
updated regularly! This trick will *not* keep the virus from getting into
your computer, but it will stop it from using your Addresses to spread
further, and it will *Alert* you to the fact that the virus has gotten into
your system." (see message below)

In addition, my message stated in the last paragraph: "Unfortunately, some
viruses are random and there is no substitute for good anti-virus software
updated regularly. If you are running virus protection software, that you
are updating regularly (this cannot be stressed enough), you will not need
to panic."

However, there may have been some misunderstanding. My intent was *NOT* for
anyone to solely use this method for anti-virus protection but to use it as
an additional virus tool ("There is no substitute for good anti-virus
software updated regularly!"). The truth of the matter is that this
e-Address & e-Inbox virus protection method is not a definite fix as I tried
to indicate ("Unfortunately, some viruses are random and there is no
substitute for good anti-virus software updated regularly. If you are
running virus protection software, that you are updating regularly (this
cannot be stressed enough), you will not need to panic."). I probably
should of said: This trick will *not* keep the virus from getting into your
computer, but it *CAN* stop it from using your Addresses to spread further,
and it *CAN* *Alert* you to the fact that the virus has gotten into your
system. At any rate I would like to share an additional source
http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/virus/quickfix.htm that will clarify and
provide a professional overview.

Also, several people replied about another anti-virus web site - AVG
AntiVirus located at www.grisoft.com. I am not
familiar with AVG anti-virus and haven't seen it reviewed anywhere yet. I
do see it being used and it seems that it is becoming popular.

I hope this information helps. Again, I apologize if anyone was mislead.
If you have problems or further questions
please let me know. :-) Thanks, Mike

*************************

> Hi Everyone,
>
> My computer picked up a virus somehow quite awhile back even though I was
> running anti-virus software and it wasn't any fun. Recently we have seen
a
> rash of new viruses that are spreading like wild fire. I wanted to let
you
> know about a computer trick that is really ingenious in its simplicity.
As
> you may know, when or if a virus gets into your computer it can head
> straight for your e-mail Addresses or e-mail Inbox and send itself to
> everyone in there, thus infecting all your friends and associates. You
see,
> that is how these viruses are spread. No one wants to admit that they are
> infected. And if you do *not* have virus software running on your system,
> that is being updated regularly (this cannot be stressed enough), then you
> could be infected and not realize it. There are two major commercial
virus
> protection software McAfee http://www.mcafee.com and Norton Antivirus
> http://www.symantec.com, there is a site with a free virus scan option
that
> will at least let you know if you have picked up any nasty gremlins that
you
> are unaware of. So, take a moment to visit Trend Micro's HouseCall
> http://housecall.antivirus.com/ and run the free scanner. Not only will
> Trend Micro's HouseCall tell you if you are infected it will deal with any
> discovered viruses. This service is very easy to use and worthwhile
because
> it puts your mind at ease. There is no substitute for good anti-virus
> software updated regularly! This trick will *not* keep the virus from
> getting into your computer, but it will stop it from using your Addresses
to
> spread further, and it will *Alert* you to the fact that the virus has
> gotten into your system.
>
> Follow the instructions below:
>
> QUICK INSTRUCTIONS
>
> 1. Open your Addresses and click on New Contact just as you would do if
you
> were adding a new friend or associate to your list of e-mail Addresses. In
> the box where you would type your friend's first name, type in !000,
that's
> an exclamation mark followed by 3 zeros. In the box below where it
prompts
> you to enter the new e-mail address, type in e-AddressAlert. If it tells
> you this is not a valid address just say yes to add it, or ok. Then
> complete everything by clicking add, enter, ok, etc.
>
> Here's what you've done and why it works: The Contact !000 will be placed
at
> the top of your Addresses as entry #1. This will be where the virus will
> start in an effort to send itself to all your friends and associates. But
> when it tries to send itself to
> !000, it will be undeliverable because of the phony e-mail address you
> entered, e-AddressAlert. If the first attempt fails, which it will
because
> of the phony address, the virus goes no further and your friends and
> associates will not be infected.
>
> 2. Open a New Mail e-mail message. Address the New Mail e-mail message
to
> yourself by putting your e-mail address in the To:
box.
> In the Subject box below add - Subject: e-InboxAlert Below in the body
of
> the message copy and paste this message for reference. I suggest that you
> save this message in your Drafts folder so that you always have a copy
> should you mistakenly delete it. Next complete this protection by copying
> and pasting to make a valid copy of your Draft Message or an *actual
> message* and send it to yourself. *Leave* the message at the top of your
> inbox so that it is the first message that the virus sends itself to.
>
> Here's what you've done and why it works: Your e-InboxAlert e-mail
message
> remains at the top of your inbox. This will be where the virus will start
> in an effort to send itself to all your Inbox e-mail. When it sends
itself
> to you first, you will be alerted by another e-mail message with the
subject
> title e-InboxAlert. It will then be necessary to clean your computer with
> your anti-virus software. If you are like me and uneasy about viruses put
> your mind at ease by following-up with a double check by another
anti-virus
> protection. Take a moment to visit Trend Micro's HouseCall
> http://housecall.antivirus.com/ and run the free scanner. Not only will
> Trend Micro's HouseCall tell you if you are infected it will deal with any
> discovered viruses. This service is very easy to use and worthwhile.
>
> The *advantage* of these methods: if an e-mail cannot be delivered from
> your Addresses you will get an e-mail telling you that an e-mail addressed
> to e-AddressAlert could not be delivered or if you receive an e-mail in
your
> Inbox from yourself with the subject line e-InboxAlert, either way, you
will
> be *notified* of this in your Inbox almost immediately. Hence, if you
ever
> receive these notifications, you will know right away that you have a
virus
> in your system. You can then take steps to get rid of it!
>
> Unfortunately, some viruses are random and there is no substitute for good
> anti-virus software updated regularly. If you are running virus
protection
> software, that you are updating regularly (this cannot be stressed
enough),
> you will not need to panic.
>
> I hope this information helps. If you have problems or further questions
> please let me know. :-)) Thanks, Mike
>

*************************

Michael G. McManness, a Jayhawk through and through, eating, sleeping, and
bleeding Crimson and Blue near the University of Kansas. Family genealogist
and research historian. "Character may be manifested in the great moments,
but it is made in
the small ones."
--- Phillip Brooks

*************************


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