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Archiver > HOFMANN > 2001-11 > 1005321201


From: "Michael G. McManness" <>
Subject: [Hofmann] [admin] Message Board Post/Reply Help
Date: Fri, 9 Nov 2001 09:53:21 -0600


Hi Everyone,

I have copied a portion of Message Board Help that I hope answers any
questions.

At the bottom of the Message Board you will find:
Request New Board | Message Board Rules | Message Board FAQ | Message Board
Help

Post/Reply Help
If you are not already a registered Ancestry.com user, you must register
before posting a message for the first time. Click here to register now.
Once registered, you must log in before posting to the boards using the
username and password you established for your account. Click here to login
now.

Click on 'Post Message' to post a new message on any board. If you are
viewing a message on a board, you can choose between posting a new message
or posting a reply to the message you are viewing. If you elect to post a
reply it will be 'threaded' with the message to which you are replying.
Threading means that responses are grouped with the original message rather
than standing alone. Posting a response as opposed to an original message
also means that if the previous posters in the thread have elected to
receive e-mail notification of responses (the default setting) they will be
notified of your reply.

Subject Box: When you choose a subject you should try to be as concise as
possible, but try to cover the basics of who, when, and where. For example,
if you are posting a query about John Smith who was born in 1832 in
Pittsburgh, PA an informative subject line would be exactly that: "John
SMITH, born 1832, Pittsburgh, PA." Never use all purpose, non-informative,
subject lines such as: "searching," "looking," "genealogy," "family search."
Remember that everyone using these boards is searching and looking for their
ancestors. Ask yourself if the subject you have posted will help others to
understand the topic of your query. If the answer is YES you have chosen an
informative subject line.

Surname Box: Only surnames (last names) should be listed in the Surname Box,
and each should be separated by a comma. The Surname Box is used to index
the surnames in your message and is not to be used for listing surnames not
included in the message text.

Categories (drop down menu): Use this menu to select from a list of data
types. Data categories (non-query) should only be selected when you are
posting actual data and not queries about data. For example, a query about a
will is still a query. The menu item for wills should not be selected for
queries.

Also see: Message Board FAQ for tips on posting an effective message.

Preview, Edit, and Post Message Help
After you have composed your message and completed all required items, you
can select either the 'Post Message' button (if you are absolutely certain
that the message is exactly as you wish to post it), or the 'Preview
Message' button if you would like to view the message as it will appear on
the board BEFORE it is actually posted. The preview screen allows you to
select from 'Edit Message' or 'Post Message' buttons. Use the 'Edit Message'
button (and not your browser's "back" button) to edit the message if
necessary prior to finally selecting the 'Post Message' button which will
post the message on the board.

Printing a Message Help
While viewing a message, click on 'Print Message' to view a printer friendly
text version of that message. Click on your browser's print icon, or follow
your usual print procedure, to print the message. Use the 'Return to
Message' link to return to the message in the normal display.

For additional information, see Message Board FAQ.

I hope this further information helps. If you have problems or further
questions please let me know. :-)) Thanks again, Mike

*************************

Michael G. McManness, a Jayhawk through and through, eating, sleeping, and
bleeding Crimson and Blue near the University of Kansas. Family genealogist
and research historian. "Character may be manifested in the great moments,
but it is made in
the small ones." --- Phillip Brooks

*************************


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