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From:
Subject: Re: [IRL-GALWAY] Galway Fishermen Killed by Barrel 1917
Date: Sun, 24 Jun 2007 18:53:42 EDT



The Galway men who died when they brought in the mine were:
Edward McDermott, Joseph Flaherty, Tim Keady, Peter Folan, Colm Feeney,
Edward Lee, Manas? Flaherty, Tom Hopkins and Peter Lee. Joe "Hughie" Faherty was
the sole survivor. He was the son of Hugh and Ann Faherty. He later married
Bridget "Biddy Ned" Feeney, my 2nd cousin, once removed. Colm Feeney (never
married) was the son of John Feeney and Bridget "Delia" Conley, of Loughanbeg,
Inverin, Co. Galway. Edward McDermott was married to Mary Folan. Some members
of the McDermott and Feeney family emigrated to the US, settling in Portland,
Maine.
Gerie
Researching: Folan/Foley, Feeney, Concannon, Waters, Naughton, Coyne,
Flaherty - all of the Inverin/Spiddal areas of Co. Galway.

In a message dated 6/24/2007 4:50:23 PM Eastern Standard Time,
writes:

Morning Olympian Olympia, Washington
19 July 1917

Galway Fishermen Killed by Barrel

Galway, Ireland, July 18 - Nine Galway fishermen were blown
to pieces a few days ago while examining a German "barrel
mine" which they had found at sea and towed ashore.

Irish fishermen have made lately a great many lucky hauls of
barrels containing petrol, tallow, oils, and similar treasures,
supposedly from torpedoed ships. This time they saw a
promising-looking barrel afloat some distance from land, with
a convenient handle on each side, and they promptly towed it
ashore, rolling it up on the beach for examination.

Four men were in the boat, and six more gathered around
while the prize was on the beach. One man, Joseph
O'Flaherty, had a suspicion of danger, and warned the others,
but they paid no attention to him, and he hid himself behind
a rock.

One of the fishermen removed a couple of screws from the head
of the barrel, and then began to pull out a piece of cord. The
explosion which followed was heard miles away, and shook
houses four miles distant.

After a time O'Flaherty, who had been wounded in the head with
a piece of stone, stood up, but not a trace of the mine or the
men was to be seen. There was only a great hole in the beach.
Searchers found a portion of the fishermen's boat nearly a mile
away. A small boy whose attention was attracted to the group
of men on the shore, was running toward them just as the mine
exploded. One of his arms was afterwards found near his home,
but there was no other trace of him.





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