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Archiver > LONDON > 2000-06 > 0961330244


From: "Stella Watkin" <>
Subject: Re: [Lon] Re: Rag Bag sorter
Date: Sun, 18 Jun 2000 13:10:44 +0100
References: <007401bfd8fd$e47a2980$a635893e@default>


Hi Pat

I bet she wouldn't make a living from it now, as most folks try and get a
few bob for old clothes at car boots or give them to charity shops. I used
to work at a scrap yard in Chester (doing the accounts etc, not sorting rag
bags, I might add) and we bought in the remains of jumble sales and sold
them on for £1 per cwt to a dealer. My boss told me they would be used in
all kinds of things such as paper manufacturing and woollen items might be
separated and used to make 'worsted' material. Good for the planet, eh.

Enjoyed your lively description, happy days :-)

Cheerio
Stella
in Deepest Beds

----- Original Message -----
From: Bubbles <>
To: <>
Sent: Sunday, June 18, 2000 9:19 AM
Subject: Re: [Lon] Re: Rag Bag sorter


> Bet you had fun
> Bubbles from Robin Hood Country.
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Sunday, June 18, 2000 8:20 AM
> Subject: [Lon] Re: Rag Bag sorter
>
>
> : Hello Pat.
> :
> : Hope you don't mind me sharing this with the list, just a taster of the
> old
> : East End.
> :
> : Some years ago, more than 50, my Mum, Kitty, had a second-hand stall in
> : Chrisp Street Market, Poplar. Apart from buying clothes from private
> houses,
> : she used to buy from a rag merchant/dealer in the East End. The
> 'emporium!'
> : was in an enormous disused factory/warehouse just off Commercial Road [I
> : think]. The clothes would have been sorted into various gigantic piles
and
> in
> : varying degrees of condition. Several 'faceless' people, employed by the
> : owner, always seemed to be busy doing the sorting in the warm, dusty
> place.
> : Although a bit 'smelly', depending on what had been brought in, it
wasn't
> not
> : too bad, just very dusty. The best of the clothes were folded and put
into
> : big hessian sacks. These were then bought by the second-hand clothes
> dealers.
> : Mum used to bring several of the great sacks home and we then had to
> re-sort
> : them to find the very best. Some were rebagged and sold back to a rag
> : merchant, some were washed and ironed, then folded very carefully, put
> back
> : into the sacks then taken to market. Believe it or not, Mum used to
> auction
> : the clothes, she'd stand on a soap box at the back of the stall, crowds
of
> : women all around, then she'd get one item at a time out of the sack,
hold
> it
> : up for all to see 'Who'll give me sixpence for this pair of drawers?'
> 'Look
> : at this lovely dress, only worn once, here, a real bargain, a shilling'.
> 'A
> : good strong pair of corsets, right, half a crown'. Dad, Len, and I would
> : stand either end of the stall to help take the money.
> :
> : What days, what memories.
> :
> : Kind regards,
> : Barbara.
> : Suffolk. England
> :
> :
> : ==== LONDON Mailing List ====
> : London-Middlesex Surnames List:
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>
> ______________________________


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