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Archiver > LONDON > 2003-08 > 1062262108


From: "Sally" <>
Subject: Re: [Lon]multiple deaths of boys/Haemophilia?
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 12:51:50 -0400
References: <000c01c36e98$ef20e2a0$0200a8c0@xavier> <000801c36ee8$259b2b20$0b01a8c0@CLEOPATRA>


No you are not talking rubbish- there are generally 105 male babies born for
every 100 female babies, but the male babies tended to not survive in as
great a number as the female. For some reason male babies are not as
resilient and/or resistant and more liable to succumb to a variety of
things.
Hence mother nature's way of making sure there are enough of both sexes
around to propagate the species.
However, you are right, with the advent of modern medicine and neonatal
care, the mortality statistics don't quite apply anymore.


Sally Taylor (nee DONALDSON)
Boxborough, Mass USA
Surnames being researched:
ADAMS- NTH
BOOKER- GLS & NTH
DAVENPORT- WAR
DONALDSON- London & Peeblesshire
DUCKETT- NTH
HAYWOOD - LEI
KENDRICK- WAR
LIPTROTT- Lancashire
PRIDE- GLS and Lanark
ROBINS- WAR
SKINNER- NTH & WAR
WESTCOTT- DEV

----- Original Message -----
From: "Val Stuart" <>
To: <>
Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2003 7:16 AM
Subject: Re: [Lon]multiple deaths of boys/Haemophilia?


> I think I remember reading somewhere that Nature ensures that 104 males
are
> born to every 100 females to compensate for the early death of baby boys
who
> are more vulnerable for some reason.
>
> With the advent of modern medicine, and the survival of more boys, this
has
> meant that there are slightly more men than women in the younger age
groups.
>
> Or am I talking rubbish??
>
> Val
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Pat Stedman" <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2003 2:49 AM
> Subject: RE: [Lon]multiple deaths of boys/Haemophilia?
>
>
> > I think Haemophilia was passed thru the female to her sons so that in
> > the case of a remarriage (which I think was part of the original query)
> > the fellow would have had to be extremely unlucky to have married two
> > women who were carriers
> >
> > It is more likely a case of sheer bad luck ( in the sense that they
> > probably all died of diffeering ailments) rather than a family disease.
> > I have a number of death certs for some of my families and one in
> > particular lost 5 of their 7 children. Two of hydrocephalus ( or "water
> > on the brain") and the others of varying complaints.
> >
> > Being female....I also subscribe to the theory that we are the stronger
> > sex and that is why predominantly males died in this family <g>
> > Please, don't all email me...totally tongue in cheek although there
> > *may* be a shred of truth in this <vbg>
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: historyresearch [mailto:]
> > Sent: Saturday, 30 August 2003 3:00 AM
> > To:
> > Subject: Re: [Lon]multiple deaths of boys/Haemophilia?
> >
> >
> > Hello,
> > These bottles were used well into the 20th century. The original
> > question seems to have got lost in the generalities of 19th century
> > diseases. If the enquirer has ruled out any of these epidemics and
> > hygiene related diseases, and as the deaths occurred over at least 3
> > generations, and only boys, I presume he/she has: then if the death
> > certificates are no help: may I mention that there were two "diseases"
> > which come straight to my mind regarding early deaths of males.
> >
> > One is the blood condition of haemophilia, carried by women (as with
> > Queen
> > Victoria) but only suffered by boys, and the other is a condition called
> > Pyloric stenosis, which again is 99per cent only suffered by baby boys.
> > The latter is an internal condition whereby the milk they take in comes
> > straight back because the"flap" which usually opens and closes to the
> > stomach grows over. The child usually died from starvation at a very
> > young
> > age. I know something about this because my youngest brother was born
> > with
> > it in 1952, and even then operations on 10day old babies were not
> > usually successful. His was.
> >
> > However, I think that the enquirer might look at the possibility of
> > haemophilia if he/she really thinks that this early death of so many
> > boys might be congenital.
> >
> > Yours
> > Vicki Turner
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Jackie Markey" <>
> > To: <>
> > Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2003 10:19 PM
> > Subject: Re: [Lon] cause of multiple deaths?
> >
> >
> > Breast feeding was not the only way in Victorian Britain. I seem to
> > remember being told, at the Black Country Museum, about a banana-shaped
> > babies feeding bottle that was connected to a "reservoir" of milk by a
> > rubber tube so that babies could suck on a constant stream of milk. As
> > these tubes were not sterilised many babies died of diarrhoea caused by
> > stomache bugs. There was one on display in the Chemists' Shop at the
> > Museum.
> >
> > Jackie
> >
> > http://bclm.co.uk/
> >
> > ______________________________
> >
> >
> >
> > ==== LONDON Mailing List ====
> > London-Middlesex Surnames List:
> > http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~hughw/london.html
> >
> >
> >
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> > http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~hughw/london.html
> >
>
>
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