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Archiver > LONDON > 2010-12 > 1291837646


From: David Roberts <>
Subject: Re: [LON] Italian Quarter, London
Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2010 19:47:26 +0000
References: <98087.64930.qm@smtp824.mail.ird.yahoo.com><9ED0060121BB46D2BB99DA7E2BF21FB3@youra97ec67e86>
In-Reply-To: <9ED0060121BB46D2BB99DA7E2BF21FB3@youra97ec67e86>


Hello List!
I find this most interesting.

My great grandfather, Thomas Palmer (1817-1897), had butcher's shops on
Drury Lane and later at 21 New Street (now New Row), Covent Garden.

Each of his 7 sons had a butcher shop - all with fairly ordinary names,
except Alfred (1861 - 1919), whose middle name was D'Alvaetio. On his Death
Certificate it became Del Veccio.

Why would a parent choose such a name? I have wondered whether Alfred might
have been the result of a *liaison dangereuse *and was christened in memory
of a former lover. More likely, I think, the family had an Italian
friend(s) and Alfred was christened such in recognition of this. The only
Italian connection of which I am aware was that of Carlo Gatti, ice makers,
who delivered ice to the shop weekly. So perhaps Thomas was very friendly
with the boss - who might just have been called D'Alvaetio?

One of Alfred's brothers, who was interested in the family history, told my
mother that the family had Spanish origins. There certainly was another
relative, I recall, who had a very Spanish or Italian appearance.

Is anyone familiar with the name of D'Alvaetio or Del Veccio? Is it Italian
or Spanish? There might be a chance of finding the name in the baptism or
marriage registers of a local church.

Thomas and his wife were married at St George's, Bloomsbury, in 1845.

Any comments would be most welcome.

David Roberts

On 8 December 2010 17:44, JFHH <> wrote:

> Alan,
> As Judy says, it all depends on dates. To add to her list, from 1878,
> St.Etheldreda's Ely Place was
> re-opened. Like St.Peter's, it ids still there.
> Regards
> John Henley
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Judy Lester" <>
> > Alan,
> > It depends on the date. From the 1860s, the most likely place would be
> > St Peter's Italian Church, Saffron Hill. It's still there, and very
> > active. There's some history here, and pictures if you google.
> > http://reocities.com/CollegePark/quad/6152/stpetereng.pdf
> >
> > If you're looking at an earlier period, the Sardinian Embassy Chapel in
> > Lincoln's Inn Fields would be a possibility. The baptism registers
> > 1772-1841 have been issued on CD by the Catholic FHS. Lots of
> > information on this chapel if you google.
> > http://www.catholic-library.org.uk/registers.html#cd
> >
> > The above are just two that come to mind. There may be others. You might
> > want to consider asking the Anglo-Italian FHS for advice?
> > http://www.anglo-italianfhs.org.uk/default.htm
> >
> > HTH
> >
> > Judy
> > London, UK
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: [mailto:]
> > On Behalf Of Alan Booth
> >
> > Could anyone kindly advise at which church the Italian residents of
> > Clerkenwell, Holborn, Saffron Hill might have worshipped - I am
> > presuming
> > they would be Roman Catholics. This follows my searches for CATTIER,
> > CANEPE,
> > ALBANESE and LANDI in the area.
>
>
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