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From:
Subject: [MAR] Wreck North Wales 1899
Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 07:11:03 EDT


Hi Carl et al,

You maybe interested in the following wreck :--


Liverpool Mercury, Wednesday, 13 December 1899
“Wrecks off the Welsh Coast.”
Fishing Boat lost at Llandudno……….
Hoylake Crew saved.
The “Gipsy King”, fishing boat [O.N. 55290] , belonging to Mr. Cummins
(sic), Isle of Man, was wrecked in Llandudno Bay at half-past one o’clock
yesterday morning. The crew were from Hoylake, and consisted of Thomas Cooper
(Master), William Cooper (Mate), Fred Jackson and Fred Roberts.
In an interview, the Master said that the boat left Llandudno on Monday,
at three o’clock in the afternoon, to go fishing in the Bay, where large
catches have been made during the week. A heavy storm, accompanied by a fall
of snow, set in about eleven o’clock on Monday night. He stood in for land
to avoid the seas which were breaking over the boat. In the early morning
she struck the bottom, and at once began to fill.
The crew took to the punt, and beat about the Bay till five o’clock
yesterday morning, before they could effect a landing. They were then nearly
starved to death [by "starved" read "frozen"], and were two hours on the shore
before they saw anyone who could direct them. They then went to Mr. S.
Dunphy, the local agent of the Shipwrecked Mariners’ Society, who assisted them
to get back to their homes.[in Hoylake]
……………………………………….
[Mr. Cummins (sic) read Mr. Cubbin, Douglas, IOM.]
……………………………………….

Smack “DO 60” Abandoned…………
At seven o’clock on Monday morning a fishing smack was discovered to have
foundered off Rhos Point, Colwyn Bay. It was first seen by quarry men
working at Penrhyn Side, who promptly ran to Colwyn Bay and rowed out to the
rescue in their small boats. The sails flapping in the strong wind gave the
impression of two men clinging to the rigging, and the would-be rescuers made
all haste.
They reached the wreck simultaneously with two other boats. It was then
found that there was no one on board the smack, and that there was a small
boat missing, the assumption being that the crew had rowed ashore on finding
that their craft was sinking.
The smack bears the letters “D” and ”O” followed by the figures “6” and
“0” and is believed to be from Liverpool. [DO represents the port of
Douglas, IOM, whereas LL represents Liverpool.]
---------------------------------------------
Thomas Cooper died the following year and is buried in Holy Trinity
graveyard, Hoylake.
---------------------------------------------
I have copies of "Official Log Book" and "Account of Crew" of the time,
received from IOM.
Ricky Cooper.



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