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Archiver > MDSTMARY > 2001-12 > 1008259452


From:
Subject: [MDSTMARY-L] Maryland and New England interactions n the 17th century.
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 11:04:12 -0500


Hi list. I wanted to put a topic out for discussion to see if anyone had
any ideas. I'm becoming more and more interested in several topics:

1) A number of early Maryland families had connections in New England. For
example:
a) The Maryland Abell family would seem to be related to the Massachusetts
Abell family just based on the use of similar given names over the
generations (Samuel, Cuthbert, Caleb, Robert, etc.);
b) Anne Gill Neale (wife of Captain James Neale) apparently had a brother,
Oliver Gill who moved to Connecticut and married Prudence Esse;
c) Thomas Lord, father-in-law of James Neale, Jr., was apparently one of the
original proprietors of Hartford, Conn;

All of the above families have connections to the Mainwaring family in
England--famous for its recusant Catholic members. Most of the families
above also have connections to the Cotton family in England. The Cottons
and Mainwarings are also connected to the Gov. William Stone family in
Maryland; the Alexanher Hamilton family in Charles County, and, probably,
more families than I know of yet. This same Cotton family was also in New
England and, in one line, produced the well-known Puritan preacher, Cotton
Mather. Interesting connections, don't you think?

Yesterday, I found a reference from Daniel Boorstin (an eminent American
Historian and former Librarian of Congress) that there was a "Richard
Gardiner" who sailed to Massachusetts with the Puritans on the
Mayflower--but who "returned to England in 1624" and never returned to
Massachusetts.

COULD THIS BE THE SAME RICHARD GARDINER WHO LATER RESURFACES IN MARYLAND AS
ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF THAT FAMILY?

Of course, this is pure speculation. But, it would make a very interesting
research project. Let me know your thoughts. John Dobricky



Has anyone ever thought about the relationship between the New England
colonies and the southern ones? It's interesting that most history books do
not mention this connection.


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