MDSTMARY-L Archives

Archiver > MDSTMARY > 2007-09 > 1189013881


From: "Betsy Wildes" <>
Subject: Re: [MDSTMARY] MDSTMARY Digest, Vol 2, Issue 404
Date: Wed, 5 Sep 2007 12:38:01 -0500 (Central Daylight Time)
References: <cf2.186147e1.340fff90@aol.com>


There was nothing on Doxey or Dority



Marylanders to Kentucky 1775-1825 Henry Peden, Jr.





Page 54

Gardiner, Clement - -Clement Gardiner was born in 1748 most likely in St
Mary’s County, Maryland and married Henrietta Boone. He was a leader in the
settlement of Cox’s Creek settlement in Kentucky circa 1792. Their children
were as follows: Joseph Gardiner, married Winifred Hamilton in Maryland;
Polly Gardner, married Benedict Smith in Maryland; Theodore Gardiner,
married Miss Rapier in Kentucky; Harry Gardiner; Francis Gardiner, married
Ann Smith in Kentucky; Ellen Gardiner, married Thomas Miles in Kentucky;
Ignatius Gardiner, moved to Louisiana; and, Ann Gardner, married Edward
Jenkins in Kentucky. (REF: KC: 114 – 117).







Page 3

Nicholas Day Amos, only son of Thomas Amos and Elizabeth Day, was born in
Baltimore County, Maryland on September 19, 1742. He took the oath of
allegiance to the state of Maryland during the Revolutionary War in 1778 and
was an ensign in the eighth Battalion of Hartford County. (REF: HCP: 5)
Nicholas married in Baltimore County on October 28, 1761 to Christina Ditto,
daughter of Abraham Ditto and Nancy Bowles. Their children were: Elizabeth
Amos (1762 -1812) married Aquila Parker (1755 dash 1834) in Maryland and
died in Bourbon County, Kentucky; Mary Amos married Joshua Barton in
Maryland in 1783; Mordecai Amos, born in Maryland, was in Jessamine County,
Kentucky in 1800, and Barren County, Kentucky Circa 1808; Thomas Amos
married Catherine DeVore in 1788 in Jefferson County, Kentucky, and died in
Bourbon County, Kentucky in 1830 (she died in 1853 in Howard County,
Indiana); Nancy Amos married John Conway; Nicholas Day Amos, Jr., born in
1771, married Ann Jones, and died in 1847 in Bourbon County, Kentucky;
Christiana Amos married M. .Malott and died prior to 1819; Benjamin Amos
married Elizabeth Griffin in 1797 in Bourbon County, Kentucky; Abraham Amos
left Kentucky early and was a preacher in 1804 in Clermont County, Ohio;
Elijah Amos was born in 1782 in Harford County, Maryland, married Rebecca
Neale in 1800 in Bourbon County, Kentucky, and their children were Thomas,
Ditto, Martha, Cassana, Harrison, William and Elizabeth (When his wife died
in 1840, Elijah married Cassander Cullison and their children: Caroline A,
Hester J, and Mary A; Sarah Amos was born 1776, married Daniel Thomas in
1801 in Bourbon County, Kentucky, and died in 1844 in Rush County, Indiana;
Ditto Amos married Martha Neale, moved to Rush County, Indiana and died in
Clinton County, Indiana; and William Amos married Margaret Barnett in 1802
in Bourbon County, Kentucky. The family of Nicholas Day Amos, Sr. moved from
Hartford County, Maryland to Washington County, Maryland prior to 1792 and
they migrated to Hinkston Creek near Ruddle’s Mill in Bourbon County,
Kentucky circa 1795. (REF: KA 3:2, P. 89; KA 3:4, P. 186;( additional family
history is contained in Maurine Schmitz and Glendola Peck’s “The Amos
Family” compiled in 1964 and available at the Maryland Historical Society
Library in Baltimore).



PAGE 128

James Ruggles was born in Maryland in 1784 and died in 1857 in Indiana. He
married first to Sarah Conway in 1804 in Mason County, Kentucky and second
to Margaret Clancy in 1813 in Fleming County, Kentucky. His brother,
Jonathan Ruggles, married Mary Gwin, widow of Nicholas Wallingford, in 1837
in Mason County, Kentucky ( Ref: KA 5:1, July, 1969, P. 49).



-------Original Message-------



From:

Date: 09/05/07 07:49:30

To:

Subject: Re: [MDSTMARY] MDSTMARY Digest, Vol 2, Issue 404





Thank you for the information Betsy. If I might lean on you for another

minute, could you look to see a Conway or a Doxey or a Dority?



Do you know if pretty much all the people from MD traveled the same

route to KY?



I would like the information about clement Gardiner.



Thank you very much, Mary


















This thread: