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From: Freda Noble <>
Subject: Re: [NCSAMPSO] Thornton's
Date: Sun, 8 Jun 2008 15:55:01 -0700
References: <000a01c8c830$b8b0f790$c224b70a@your03667082de><E1C65DCEFF644BEEB20D55D1310B633A@BettyPC> <a06240822c4709a2f3ea6@[66.81.73.222]><00cd01c8c98b$d63d2e30$c224b70a@your03667082de>
In-Reply-To: <00cd01c8c98b$d63d2e30$c224b70a@your03667082de>


Gail, thank you again and again for sharing your
data. I particularly like to add touching
stories and obituaries like W. H. Rhodes'.

I have traced the Thorntons to Illinois and have
enjoyed learning about the family "up north." My
Martha Harrison Robertson moved to Macoupin,
Illinois, after her husband died during the War,
and I now suspect she knew the Thorntons. Fun!
Freda



>Freda, I have a Calvin son of Eldridge Thronton
>and Royal AND Eldridge is the son of Nathaniel
>and Millie his second wife.
> My line has Nathaniel H. brother to David
>is married to Edna Strickland b. 1804 .. and
>this N. has a son Nathaniel m. Martha b. 1821 .
>That is what I have been given by Jean Thornton
>"you have spoken to her she lives in Raleigh".
> Here is a few pages about Samuel Thornton m. Ava Hester Raynor
>
>Descendants of Samuel Isaac Thornton
>
>
>
>
>Generation No. 1
>
>
>1. SAMUEL ISAAC10 THORNTON (DAVID9, NATHANIAL8,
>THOMAS7, THOMAS6, MARK5, LUKE4, HENRY3, HENRY2,
>HENRY1) was born April-17-1828 in ? Maybe in
>Wayne co. NC father had land in Wayne co NC.,
>and died May-30-1912 in Front room at Harper
>House Bentonville NC. grave nearby field. He
>married (1) AVA HESTER RAINER Abt. 1851 in
>Johnston Co.NC, daughter of FRANK RAINER. She
>was born Bet. 1832 & 1835 in NC, and died
>May-1880 in Bentonville Township, Four Oaks ,
>Johnston co. NC. He married (2) JANE SUSAN (
>LADY JANE) KENNEDY February-18-1885 in Johnston
>Co.NC1, daughter of JOHN KENNEDY and SUSAN. She
>was born Abt. 1838 in near Benson, NC, and died
>April-27-1921 in died at Dock Thornton's ,buried
>at Harper House beside Samuel I. Thornton.
>
>Notes for SAMUEL ISAAC THORNTON:
>
>1850 Census Johnston Co. NC
>
>House # 1459
>
>Thornton, Samuel 23
>
>Hester 19
>
>Nancy 65
>
>Calvin 25
>
>
>The farm home of John and Amy Harper, built in
>the late 1850s, played a key role in the Battle
>of Bentonville, March 19-21, 1865. Occupied by
>Union troops on the first day of fighting, the
>house served as a field hospital for Sherman's X
>IV Army Corps. Over 500 wounded soldiers,
>including 45 Confederates, were treated at this
>facility. John, Amy, and seven of their children
>remained at the home throughout the battle,
>helping to care for the wounded men.On March 22,
>1865, Sherman's army evacuated the Bentonville
>area and transported all Federal wounded to
>nearby Goldsboro. Confederate casualties were
>left behind at Harper's, many of whom lingered in
>
>convalescence for weeks.
>
>In one of the great personality clashes of the
>Civil War, the troubled relationship between
>Davis and Johnston came to a head in mid-July
>1864, during the Atlanta Campaign. Furious with
>Johnston for retreating before Sherman in
>Georgia instead of engaging him in a decisive
>battle, Davis promptly removed "Old Joe" from
>command of the Army of Tennessee. But the
>Confederate president counted few options as
>Sherman approached North Carolina, and with
>Lee's earnest request Davis gave in and
>reluctantly allowed the general-in-chief to call
>upon Johnston for his services.
>
>On February 22, 1865, Lee sent an urgent
>dispatch to his old friend Johnston, who had
>retired to Lincolnton, North Carolina:
>
>Assume command of the Army of Tennessee and all
>troops in Department of South Carolina, Georgia,
>and Florida. Assign General Beauregard to duty
>under you, as you may select. Concentrate all
>available forces and drive back Sherman.
>
>Though he felt the effort to stop Sherman had
>come too late, a weary Johnston methodically set
>out to collect the scattered array of
>Confederate forces at his disposal. The troop
>concentration he would effect in North Carolina
>on short notice, and the resulting battle at
>Bentonville, would stand in sharp contrast to
>the general's earlier war record.
>
>The monument was erected by the Goldsboro Rifles
>in 1893, and marks a mass grave containing the
>remains of some 360 Confederates who died at
>Bentonville. Several of the soldiers buried here
>died after receiving treatment in the Harper
>House. Most of the remains were disinterred from
>various parts of the battlefield in the late
>nineteenth century and reinterred at this
>location. The marker was dedicated on March 20,
>1895 to mark the 30th anniversary of the Battle
>of Bentonville. On hand for the occasion were
>Rev. John Harper Jr.-who offered a prayer for
>the ceremony--and Wade Hampton, who had
>commanded Confederate cavalry during the battle.
>A monument to Texas soldiers who fought at
>Bentonville can be seen in the field near
>monument.
>
>Samuel Thronton is buried in field near Harper
>House,the grave stone of Jane Kennedy is missing
>... Susan Thornton Siler , talking about her
>father, Samuel Thornton. He went home to check
>on his family. He was held prisoner of war at
>Point Lookout in Maryland.
>
>Point Lookout, Maryland was the largest and one
>of the worst Northern prisoner-of-war camps. It
>was established August 1, 1863, on the barren
>peninsula where the Potomac River flows into the
>Chesapeake Bay. The prison consisted of "two
>enclosures of flat sand, one about thirty and
>the other about ten acres, each surrounded by a
>fence fifteen feet high.
>
>All inmates were enlisted men, and they lived in
>overcrowded tents, with no barracks to protect
>them from heat and coastal storms. Water was
>scarce and polluted and there was never enough
>food or firewood; both were strictly rationed.
>Rats were a major source of protein for some
>inmates, and catching them became a favorite
>sport in the camp.
>
>There was much animosity between the prisoners
>and the guards, who were mostly black troops.
>One Rebel who had managed to purchase his
>freedom from the prison reported that "murder
>was not only not scrupled at, but opportunities
>sought for its commission by the guards, who are
>known to have been offered by the officer of the
>day as much as $10 and $15 apiece for every
>prisoner they could shoot in the discharge of
>their duty."
>
>Although it has been estimated that over 14,000
>prisoners died at Pt. Lookout, only 3,384 are
>known to be buried in Point Lookout cemetery.
>The soldiers buried there have been moved twice
>and now rest in a mass grave beneath a monument.
>The 85 foot tall Confederate monument that
>watches over this mass grave was the very first
>monument erected to commemorate Confederate
>soldiers. It bears bronze tables inscribed with
>the names of those who are known to be buried in
>the mass grave. There is one other small
>monument placed there by the state of Maryland
>in memory of the prisoners.
>
>
>Samuel raised & raced fine horse flesh and he
>liked to sit on the porch of the Harper House &
>watch his horses , so he fenced in the front
>yard & used it for a horse pasture. His favorite
>pastime was horse trading and buying land.
>
>He thought his granddaughter Ethel acted in an
>unlady like manner because she sat astraddle the
>wood fence with her dress tail flying,
>(according to Samuel),
>
>Thornton Family reunion photo taken at Harper House in 1893.
>
>When "Lady" Jane Kennedy Thornton died Whitfield
>Henry Rhodes was preacher at funeral. The coffin
>was set on two chairs, after service he laid his
>panama hat on coffin to take up a collection !
>Dora Dunn Jernigan called him a Jack Leg
>Preacher, he sold bibles,preached,ect. She was
>there at Jane's funeral as a little girl.
>
>Notes for AVA HESTER RAINER:
>
>1850 Census
>
>House # 1459
>
>Thornton, Samuel 23
>
>Hester 19
>
>Nancy 65
>
>Calvin 25
>
>1880 census
>
>Hester died May 1880 residence house # 2
>
>Dora Dunn said Ava Hester was buried in cemetery
>which was covered over by a pond.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>Notes for JANE SUSAN ( LADY JANE) KENNEDY:
>
>The funeral services were performed by Whitfield H. Rhodes text Rev. 15:13
>
>Dora Jernigan her stepmother was Lulu Thornton
>granddaughter of Samuel I. Thornton (she said he
>was a Jack Leg Preacher) put casket on two
>chairs, put straw hat out took up a collection !
>All the children called her Old Lady Thornton.
>Samuel I. Thornton and Jane Kennedy are both
>buried in field next to Harper House.
>
>
>Children of SAMUEL THORNTON and AVA RAINER are:
>
>2. i. EMILY MILLIA11 THORNTON, b. May-14-1862,
>Johnston Co NC.; d. August-18-1926, Wayne co. NC.
>
>3. ii. SUSAN ( SUSIE ) THORNTON, b. 1865,
>Johnston Co. NC.; d. November-04-1955, Sunset
>Memoral Park Smithfield Twp. Johnston Co. NC..
>
>4. iii. SAMUEL ( DOCK ) THORNTON, JR, b.
>August-20-1873, Johnston co. NC; d.
>March-14-1928, North of Newton Grove,
>Bentonville, Johnston co. NC.
>
>5. iv. MARY E. THORNTON, b. 1851, NC. Lived in
>Johnston Co.; d. July-15-1922, Johnston Co NC.
>
>6. v. BOWDON LUTHER THORNTON, b.
>September-18-1855, ? Johnston / Sampson co. NC;
>d. August-13-1934, lived in Adel , buried
>Woodlawn Cemetery, Cook Co. Ga..
>
>7. vi. WILLIAM DAVID THORNTON, b.
>September-08-1857, Johnston Co NC.; d.
>June-10-1902, Dunn, Harnett co NC.
>
>8. vii. ALONZO (LONNIE) THORNTON, b.
>October-25-1875, Johnston co NC; d. May-03-1948,
>Bentonville Township, near Harper House,
>Johnston co NC.
>
>9. viii. JAMES FRANKLIN (BOB) THORNTON, b. 1869,
>Johnston Co NC.; d. Bef. February-01-1955,
>Johnston Co NC.
>
>10. ix. MARTHA ( FANNY ) THORNTON, b.
>December-1867, Johnston Co NC; d. Bef. 1909.
>
>x. NANCY THORNTON, b. Abt. May-1860, Newton
>Grove area, Johnston co. NC; d. Infant, Newton
>Grove , Johnston co. NC.
>
>Notes for NANCY THORNTON:
>
>1860-Johnston County, NC - Newton Grove PO page 813
>
>Samuel THORNTON - Wht 33
>
>Hester - 24
>
>Mary - 9
>
>Bowden - 5
>
>William - 3
>
>Nancy 2/Months
>
>maybe Nancy died as an infant as not seen on other census
>
>
>
>Generation No. 2
>
>
>2. EMILY MILLIA11 THORNTON (SAMUEL ISAAC10,
>DAVID9, NATHANIAL8, THOMAS7, THOMAS6, MARK5,
>LUKE4, HENRY3, HENRY2, HENRY1) was born
>May-14-1862 in Johnston Co NC., and died
>August-18-1926 in Wayne co. NC. She married
>WILLIAM HENRY RHODES, JR April-19-1882 in Furney
>Langston's in Johnston co. NC, son of WILLIAM
>RHODES and LYDIA SMITH. He was born
>September-08-1861 in Wake Co. NC. ? Bertie Co.
>NC, and died January-08-1933 in Fork Township ,
>Wayne Co. NC.
>
>Notes for EMILY MILLIA THORNTON:
>
>MRS. EMILY RHODES
>
>In sad but loving remembrance of my dear wife Emily, who departed
>
>this life August 18, 1926 On the memory of that day as I stood with an aching
>
>heart, looking at her dear face knowing we soon must part.
>
>Rest dear Emily, thy labor is over. Thy willing hands will toil no more, a
>
>faithful wife both true and kind. No one knows
>the silent heart ache only those
>
>who have lest can tell of grief that is born in
>silence for the one I loved so well.
>
>Dear Emily, 1 am sad and lonely today. To think how suddenly you were
>
>taken away, my heart is broken and grief is my pain. When I think of you dear
>
>Emily, whom death had to claim. I cannot forget dear Emily the long may seem
>
>the day. And often in the lonely hours I wipe the tears away.
>
>Often when the days are brightest a gloom steals in my heart, and it brings
>
>back memories of the day God we part.
>
>For the Lord who gave, has called you. To~ HIS ~will we all must bow. You
>
>are free from pain and suffering. Not a care can reach you now, the rolling
>
>stream of life still rolls on but still the
>vacant chair recalls the love, the voice
>
>and smile, of you dear Emily, who once sat there, just a thought of sweet
>
>remembrance, just a memory fond and true. Just the love and sweet devotion of
>
>the one who ever thinks of you, in my heart your memory lingers, tender, kind
>
>and true, there is not an hour, dear darling, that I do not think of you.
>
>There are times when grief is so heavy to have to bear it seems, but God
>
>whispers and says, my child have patience and courage to wait for some day you
>
>will meet your loved one face to face at the Pearly gate. A happy home we
>
>once~.enjoyed, how sweet the memory still, but
>death has left à vacant chair the
>
>world can never fill. I can see your dear sweet
>face in~ mind The last sweet look
>
>you gave me still lingers in my mind. I often
>think of the days I spent with you the
>
>days when you were happy and I was too, but you are gone and I am alone and
>
>memory is the only friend I can call my own. The
>flowers lay upon your grave may
>
>wither and decay but the love for my dear wife, will never pass away.
>
>Your loving husband W. H. Rhodes
>
>
>
>
>
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