NOVA-SCOTIA-L Archives

Archiver > NOVA-SCOTIA > 1998-07 > 0900707318


From: Donald MacFarlane <>
Subject: [NOVA-SCOTIA-L] Re: History of Antigonish
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 1998 13:28:38 -0700


Dear Donald,
Enclosed are the excerpts from “History of Antigonish” you asked about in your
June 9th e-mail. I have been making it a practice to slowly scan this and other
important genealogy books to make them more accessible to transmit. Sorry it
took so long to get back to you, but I think you’ll find them helpful.

Good luck,

Don

History of Antigonish
Edited by
Raymond A. MacLean

(from volume 1, page 46)

The name Moidart is said to be composed of the Gaelic words "muid" - sea spray,
and "ard" - high, the heights of the sea spray. The Moidart people who came out
in 1791 gave this district the name of their native home. These came out to
Pictou in the ship "Dunkeld", and settled in Moidart. Among the emigrants of
1791 were Dougald Ban MacDonald, John Smith, Donald Smith, Donald McPherson and
his son, John McPherson, John McDonald (Ban), and his father Angus McDonald, who
settled in Moidart. Donald McPherson and Angus McDonald were old men when they
came out; they had been soldiers at home, and took part in the battle of
Culloden(9). They are buried in the old burial ground near the shore at
Arisaig(10).

(From Volume 2, page 28 footnotes to Volume 1)

9 In a list of the Moidart men called out for the rising of 1745 given by Father
Charles MacDonald in his “Moidart or Among the Clanranalds" there appears the
name of Donald MacPherson, a married man from Kinlochmoidart, who possessed a
sword. "Prisoners of Forty-five" shows a man of the same name from Moidart, who
was captured and released under the general pardon of 1747, after imprisonment
in Kelso and Edinburgh. The work thus quoted shows two men named Angus MacDonald
as having been imprisoned, one designated "senior" and the other "junior”. They
were classed as "Common Highlanders" of Clanranald" regiment arrested on
sus-picion, and seem to have been released after a short imprisonment in the
castle and jail at Edinburgh.
10 In 1938 a cairn was erected at Knoydart to commemorate the pioneers Hugh
MacDonald, Donald MacPherson and Angus MacDon-ald, veterans of Culloden. Through
the interest of Capt. Don Sinclair three stones picked on the field of Culloden
were brought to Canada and placed in the cairn. Among present-day descendants of
the old soldiers are Rev. Dr. Hugh MacPherson, St. F X University; Rev. Rod
MacPherson, Georgeville; John J. MacDonald Angus D. MacDonald, Colin MacDonald,
MacAra's Brook; Mrs. A C MacGillivray and H,A. MacDonald, Bailey's Brook; Mrs.
MacMillan in Johnstown (Ed.); Mrs. MacPherson, Dorchester, Mass.; Mrs. Ogle
Simsbury, Conn. The late Rev. William MacPherson, Johnstown (Ed) was a
great-grandson of William MacPherson.

D. MacPherson wrote:

> Don,
> Thanks for the reply and the offer.
> Apparently there is mention of a Donald McPherson and son John coming to
> Pictou on the Dunkeld in 1791 on page 46 and goes something like:
> . "Among the emigrants
> of 1791 were Dougald Ban MacDonald, John Smith, Donald Smith, Donald
> McPherson
> and his son, John McPherson, John McDonald (Ban), and his father Angus
> McDonald, who settled in Moidart. Donald McPherson and Angus McDonald were
> old men when they came out; they had been soldiers at home, and took part in
> the battle of Culloden. They are buried in the old burial grounds near the
> shore at Arisaig."
> Is there any further information on these McPhersons or any McPhersons at
> all in the book?
> It is a long shot but this could be my missing genealogy link!
> Tapadh Leat,
> Domhnall Liath
> ("Thank You, Greyhaired Donald" (MacPherson)in Gaelic)

This thread: