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From: "Nancy Broermann" <>
Subject: [OhClermo] Lindsey
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 11:42:38 -0400
In-Reply-To: <c97b0c2a0904140534s3c5b7062tec73c476eeed89ad@mail.gmail.com>


This email is written in response to Debbie and anyone else searching for
"Lindsey".
Here are my research notes and notes written from others researching
Lindsey's and Flemings. Please read through them and lets get a discussion
going.
I would like to prove/disprove what I have found - I have David Lindsey
marrying Mary Flemming, but she is about 20 years younger than him, so I'm
not sure.

I have Edmund Lindsey and Eliz Beasley as parents of David Lindsey. Edmund
was born in 1686 and Elizabeth was born 20 Feb 1724/25 St George's Parish,
Baltimore Co. MD. Their sons were David 1700-1782; Isaac Lindsey, and
Nimrod Lindsey.

For David Lindsey, I have that he married Mary Fleming. Their children were
Alexender born PA, Caleb, Catherine, Jacob, James, Jane, Rachel, Hezekiah,
Edmund "Edward" was born Lancaster Co. PA and died 1816. Will located in
Newberry SC. Next son is David was born July 1754 and died 1814 Cynthiana,
Harrison Co. KY. Next son is William born 1757 Cumberland and died 15 Sept
1838 New Richmond.

About "Lindsey"

CC History: David Lindsey emigrated from Scotland prior to the rev War and
settled on a farm near Pittsburg.

Lindseys of America: by Isabella Lindsey. Written 1889. Munsell and Sons.
Albany, p 218-219.
"David Lindsey emigrated directly from Scotland to the US before the
Revolutionary War. He bought and settled on a large tract of land near
Pittsburg where he later died. He left 4 sons."

The following letter was found among the old papers of Elisha M. Fleming, a
Kentucky pioneer, bearing the names and addresses as follows:
'Mr. Thomas Fleming or Andrew Fleming, Pennsillvena" and was published in
the "Makemson Family in America" by C.L. Makemson.
March ye 19th 1758 (Letter written by David Lindsey) *note: spelling is
exactly how it was written.
Dear Cusen,
I had the upertunity of reading your letter that was sent to your
father-in-law, which gave me great satisfaction to here your were in all
good helthand fortuned so well as to be possessed in so good a bargain of
lands. We are all in good helth at present. I bless God for all his mercies
and yr Uncle David is helthy and harty and do all join in our love and
compliments to you and your families and enquiring friends. I expected an
account oftener from them only times being troublesome in that country with
wars that we were asured that you were all ded or killed. The bargains of
your lands in that country do greatly encourage me to pluck up my spirits
and made Redie for the Journey, for we are now oppressed with our lands set
at 8s per acres and other improvements cutting our lands into two acres
parts and Quicking and only two years time for doing all this, ye we cannot
stand anymore. I expected a letter from you more oftener or that cusen Wm
Fleming would come over before this time, but these things does not
discourage me to goe onloy we depend on ye Directions in the goods fitting
to take that place. I had disappointment of 20s worth of Lining cloth ye I
sold, nd had James Hoskins bond for the money. The merchant ran away and I
had great trouble in geting my money so that was delivered. Brother John
Fleming is dead, and brother James Lindsey is married again to one Hoskins
and his Robert has service to his Uncle James Martin and desires to know if
he will redeem him if he goes over there. He is a good weaver and is
willing to work for his passage till it's paid. Your cusen in Desert Martin
is all in helth Cusen Mary to let you know all my fathers is en helth and
joins in ye love to ye. My father is very far spent and I expect to see him
buried I leave the place. Your father and Uncle Andrew is but tender in
helth. Sarah Rickents desire to be remembered in her love to her sister
Nellie and other friends. Our living is dear in this place.
I conclude with my love to you and all friends there. I am your till death.
David Lindsey

(The above letter was sealed with a red wax seal with no envelope or stamp.
It reaced the addressees with only the address appearing at the head of the
letter. Of course there were no stamps in use then, the addressee paid for
the carriage of all letters. Reference to the war means the French and
Indian Wars was then in progress in America. The letter is known to have
been seet from the home of Andrew and William Fleming, which was in Tyrone
County, Northern Ireland. Cusen in Desert Martin, refers to Desertmartin in
Derry County)


Your Cusen in Desert master is all in health.Cusen Mary to let ye know
that all my fathers family is in helth and joins in ye love to ye.My
father is ver far spent and I expect to see him buried before I leave
the place.Your father and my uncle Andrew is but tender in helth.Sarah
Rickets desires to be remembered in her love to her sister Nelly and
other friends.Our living is dear in this place.I conclude with my love
to you and all friends.I am your till death.

David Lindsey

I have preserved the quaint old spelling of that letter.It was written
on legal paper,and folded and sealed with red sealing wax,and no
envelope or stamp.The town from which it is posted is not given.It seems
that rumors of the French and Indian war which lasted from 1754 to 1769
and ended by the English conquering New France,now Canada,had reached
Ulster Province for he says in the letter he supposed his American
friends were all "ded and killed".
This letter was addressed to Thomas "or"Andrew and refers in the text to
William Fleming,and from statements made in the letter we know it came
from the neighborhood of their home in Tyrone County,Ireland.It was a
family letter sent by the husband of a cousin to her cousins,and I
interpret it in reference to the new names of the family it discloses as
follows;

Your Uncle David is helthy and harty,"refers to an old man,the brother
of Malcom Fleming."Brother john Fleming is dead"refers to a cousin of
the brothers,William,Andrew,and Thomas,and called by David
Lindsey,brother,because he was brother to wife of David Lindsey.

Your cousin in Desert master (or Desertmartin in Derry County) is all in
health"refers to another line of cousins than the one Lindsey married
into."Your father"is but tender in health"refers to the father of
Mary,wife of Thomas,who was married before coming to America.

Interesting.

Lou Rosselott



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Wendy Schmutz (who sent the above letter to Margaret Teerlink) says "if this
letter is from David Lindsey, father of Hezekiah Lindsey 1747-1826 and his
brothers Edmond, David and William, then these sons were not born in Ft
Pitt, PA as previously thought but probably in Northern Ireland. David
Lindsey probably arried in PA withing a year or two of this letter, i.e.
1760. Wendy Schmutz, a Lindsey researcher lives at 4325 American Poets Dr.
Niceville, Fl 32578. Her phone number is 850-484-2440.
Margaret Teerlink can be reached at 1415 Roberta St. Salt Lake City, Utah
84115.



P 218,219 Lindsay's of America" Book: Another family of Lindsays, spelled
however with a "e" (Lindsey) trace their early ancestry to this locality,
and are perhaps related to the preceding families I have written of who
settled there. The tradition, however in this family, is that their early
ancester came from Scotland before the Revolution, but this tradition may
arise from the fact that being originally from Scotland ere their ancestor
settled in Ireland, and the Clan being soold a scotch one, the elder
membersdwelt more on this point in their history, and in consequence,
posterity has clung to it and SO LOST TRACE OF THEIR IRISH IDENTITY. the
genealogy of this branch as given to me by one of it's members, now settled
in Vasalia, California, Tipton Lindsey, Esq (and his daughter Kate) who has
shown great interest in her family ancestry, who had it from her fatherin
turn is, that David LIndsey, (then spelled with an "a" he thinks) emigrated
before the Revolutionary war direct from Scotland, and bought and settled a
large farm near or where the city of Pittsburgh now is; that here he lived
and died, and left four sons, vex: Hezekiah, who settled in Ohio; David Jr
of Kentucky (or as one family member says who settled in Virginia) and
Edward of North Carolina; and William who was killed in the Revolutionary
war (at the Battle of Guilford Court house) having been under General
Morgan, then commanding a branch of Genral Green's army. William left two,
Viz: John who died in the wilds of Kentucky, or was killed at Boon's lick,
Missouri, unmarried; and William, who lived in Kentucky, and afterward in
Indiana where he died , these two Lindsey's had a sister named Sallie, who
married a Mr Ailliams and lived in North Carolina, near Guilford ccourt
house; William who died in Indiana, left sons Joh, William, Joshua, Findla,
and Boyde, and Daughters, these sons tis said were fond of relating to their
familes that they descended from Sir David Lindsey, of Queen of Scots time.


According to Margaret Lindsey Teerlink
"I recently received this information about the sons of David B. Lindsey.
There had been some confusion about whether one son was named Edward or
Edmund. I hope this can settle the issue.
David Lindsey had issue Hezekiah, Edward, William, and David Jr., and
perhaps others. Research indicates David settled on a 400 acre tract of land
situated on the waters of Miller's Run approximately 20 miles southwest of
old Ft Pitt, which today is Washington County near the village of Cecil and
just west of the Allegheny-Washington County Line. This area at the time in
question was claimed by both Virginia and Pennsylvania until the dispute was
settled Dec 23, 1784. Westmoreland County PA and Yohogania County VA both
claimed jurisdiction in separate courts within a few miles of each other;
the Westmoreland Court at Hanna's Town, the Virginia Court first at
Pittsburgh and later the Youhogania County Court was held on the Andrew
Heath farm, a mile or so above West Elizabeth in what is now Allegheny
County.
This was taken from Crumrine's Pennsylvania Controversy, Annals of the
Carnegie Museum PP 518,119, through 524, 1902.



David evidently lived in the area we discussed earlier belonging to VA &
PA. Fort Pitt

Query 5:

David Lindsey of Pennsylvania - Margaret Lindsay Atkinson's 1889 book, "The
Lindsays of America, pp. 218-220, provided the key to my Lindsey-Lindsay
connection back to the pre-Revolutionary War era. She tells of a David
Lindsay who emigrated from Scotland and bought and settled on a large farm
near "or where the city of Pittsburgh now is." There he lived and died,
leaving four sons: Hezekiah, who settled in Ohio; David, Jr., of KY (then
western Virginia); Edward of North Carolina, and William, who died in the
Revolutionary War leaving two sons, John of KY and William of KY and later
of Vincennes, IN (where William died). (See National Archives W553, BLWt
28649-160-55, film 1566:0402, and Hezekiah's file S41770, film 1566:0641.)

Research to establish further data concerning the senior David Lindsay who
settled near Fort Pitt, has revealed little. In Book 1A, page 160,
Washington Co. PA is recorded a deed conveyance from David Lindsey to John
Reed, 4 March 1780, recorded 6 Dec 1783; David Lindsey of YOUGHAGANIA
County, VA, receiving twelve thousand pounds currency of Pennsylvania from
John Reed of same county and state, said tract of 400 acres "lying and
being on the waters of Miller's Run within the County and State aforesaid."

The Washington County, PA, Canonsburg quadrangle map (1960) shows this
apparent property, referred to as "Justice" warranted to a John Reed in
1786, the boundaries bordered by the same property owners referred to in
David Lindsey's deed release in 1780. Pennsylvania records today
apparently contain no records of the former ownership by David Lindsey of
John Reed's property "Justice."

The diary of George Washington, 20 Sep 1784, states, "Went early this
morning to view my land and to receive the final determination of those who
live upon it...Dined at David Reed's, after which Squire Reed began to
inquire whether I would part with the land, and upon what terms, adding
that although they did not conceive they would be dispossessed yet to avoid
contention they would buy....I told them I had no inclination to sell..."

A footnote in the published diary discloses that David Reed and his brother
Squire John Reed came from Lancaster County to Washington County in 1777
and bought land on Miller's Creek from an agent of George Croghan, who
claimed the land to the exclusion of Washington. Apparently, the senior
David Lindsey of Youghagania County, Virginia, (now Washington County, PA),
sold title to disputed land.

There is no known genealogical data on the man other than what is revealed
in Margaret Lindsay Atkinson's book of 1889, her information being given to
her by Tipton Lindsey, Esq., of Tulare County, California, pioneer and
state senator (1874) and his daughter Kate. They revealed that their early
ancestor David Lindsey came directly from Scotland before the Revolution
but expressed the possibility he may hav settled for a time in Ireland.

David Lindsey, Jr, was a ranger on the frontier and settled near Ruddle's
Fort, Bourbon County, KY cir 1780 (later lying in Harrison County three
miles northwest of Cynthiana). He married twice, first to a woman whose
name is unknown and second to Nancy McNay (McKay?) on 16 November 1796. By
the first marriage there were twelve children:

James, John, William (my ancestor), Joseph, Mary, Margaret, Rebekah, David,
Isabella, Jane, Ann, and Samuel. There were no children by the second
marriage. ----Forrest Wood, 5001 44th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105.

EDITOR'S NOTE:
(1) "Petitions from Yohogania County, Virginia," Raymond M. Bell, Virginia
Genealogist, 17 (1973) 212-223, has one Lindsay entry: p. 213 27 Oct 1778
petition requesting division of Yohogania county, which petition signed by
David Linsey;

(2) Virginia Court Records of Southwestern Pennsylvania: Records of the
District of West Augusta and Ohio and Yohogania Counties, Virginia,
1775-1780, Boyd Crumrine, (Baltimore, MD: 1974, reprinted from Annals of
the Carnegie Museum, Pittsburg, PA: 1902-1905), has several Lindsay entries
but only one for David: p. 398 18 Jan 1780 Yohogania County Court
appearance by David Lindsey charged with perjury.)


216 Beach Park Lane
Cape Canaveral, FL 32920-5003
LINDSAY, HARRISON & CSA-HISTORY Roots Mail List
Home of The *HARRISON* Repository & *MY FAMILY*
http://moon.ouhsc.edu/rbonner/harintro.htm

Data Managed by Becky Bass Bonner and Josephine Lindsay Bass

--------------------------------
End of LINDSAY-D Digest V98 Issue #147
**************************************

Westmoreland County was the first county of the colony of PA erected west of
the Allegheny Mountains and the last under the hereditary Penn Proprietaries
and the 11th county established in the colony. The principal reason for
erecting the county was to establish a government bulwark against the
claims of virginia for Western PA, from which colony encouraged by the Ohio
Co. many pioneers were emigration via Braddock Road and settling in this
territory.

The territory that formed Westmoreland Co was purchased in 1768 by the
family of Wm Penn from the Six Nations and it was opened to settlers in
April 1769. This included what is today generally considered southwestern PA
and from it were carved Washington, Greene, and Fayette, Indiana, and
Somerset, Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, and Cambria Counties. The present SW
section of PA was thought to be Cumberland Co PA with the county seat at
Carlisle and also Augusta County, a part of Virginia with the county seat at
Staunton. Real settlements began after 1764 in this area. The early
settlers came from the western counties of VA and Maryland. The Baptist
came to Uniontown in 1766-68' the German Lutherans to German Township,
Fayette Co in 1770. The quakers and Scotch Irish Presbyterians came from
Eastern PA to Brownsville before 1770 and the population of Westerne PA was
estimated at 1500 at this time.

The LIndseys were likely Scotch Irish Presbyterians.

In a book titled "Emigrants to Pennsylvania, p 116" " John McMullan assigns
Margaret Boyd (a servent from Ireland in the snow Martha) to David Lindsay
of Bucks County, Yeoman, for 3 years from May 19, 1746. Consideration 14
(pounds/shillings?): customary dues. In the same book, under the account
of servents bound and assigned before James Hamilton, Mayor of Philadelphia,
under July 17, 1746, is David Lindsay with concent of his mother Bershaba
binds himself apprentice to jacob Shoemaker of Philadelphia, turner, for 6
years from this date to be taught the trade of a turner. "


About "Fleming"

The following letter was found among the old papers of Elisha M. Fleming, a
Kentucky pioneer, bearing the names and addresses as follows:
'Mr. Thomas Fleming or Andrew Fleming, Pennsillvena" and was published in
the "Makemson Family in America" by C.L. Makemson.
March ye 19th 1758 (Letter written by David Lindsey)
Dear Cusen,
I had the upertunity of reading your letter that was sent to your
father-in-law, which gave me great satisfaction to here your were in all
good helthand fortuned so well as to be possessed in so good a bargain of
lands. We are all in good helth at present. I bless God for all his mercies
and yr Uncle David is helthy and harty and do all join in our love and
compliments to you and your families and enquiring friends. I expected an
account oftener from them only times being troublesome in that country with
wars that we were asured that you were all ded or killed. The bargains of
your lands in that country do greatly encourage me to pluck up my spirits
and made Redie for the Journey, for we are now oppressed with our lands set
at 8s per acres and other improvements cutting our lands into two acres
parts and Quicking and only two years time for doing all this, ye we cannot
stand anymore. I expected a letter from you more oftener or that cusen Wm
Fleming would come over before this time, but these things does not
discourage me to goe onloy we depend on ye Directions in the goods fitting
to take that place. I had disappointment of 20s worth of Lining cloth ye I
sold, nd had James Hoskins bond for the money. The merchant ran away and I
had great trouble in geting my money so that was delivered. Brother John
Fleming is dead, and brother James Lindsey is married again to one Hoskins
and his Robert has service to his Uncle James Martin and desires to know if
he will redeem him if he goes over there. He is a good weaver and is
willing to work for his passage till it's paid. Your cusen in Desert Martin
is all in helth Cusen Mary to let you know all my fathers is en helth and
joins in ye love to ye. My father is very far spent and I expect to see him
buried I leave the place. Your father and Uncle Andrew is but tender in
helth. Sarah Rickents desire to be remembered in her love to her sister
Nellie and other friends. Our living is dear in this place.
I conclude with my love to you and all friends there. I am your till death.
David Lindsey

(The above letter was sealed with a red wax seal with no envelope or stamp.
It reaced the addressees with only the address appearing at the head of the
letter. Of course there were no stamps in use then, the addressee paid for
the carriage of all letters. Reference to the war menas the French and
Indian Wars was then in progress in America. The letter is known to have
been seet from the home of Andrew and William Fleming, which was in Tyrone
County, Northern Ireland. Cusen in Desert Martin, refers to Desertmartin in
Derry County)

Wendy Schmutz says "if this letter is from David Lindsey, father of Hezekiah
Lindsey 1747-1826 and his brothers Edmond, David and William, then these
sons were not born in Ft Pitt, PA as previously thought but probably in
Northern Ireland. David Lindsey probably arried in PA withing a year or two
of this letter, i.e. 1760.
Cookstown,County Tyrone,Ireland
17 March 1882

Dear Sir:

I have had your letter making inquiry regarding your ancestors in this
place.I am the lineal successor of the ministers of Cookstown
Presbyterian Church,and have never seen even the handwriting of any of
the predecessors except that of Mr. alezander Fleming who immediately
preceded me.

They kept no congregational records prior to 1830.There is no baptismal
registry,no marriage registry,and not even a list of seat holders.As to
baptisms and marriages,these were as a rule celebrated by the minister
in the private houses of the people,or in their own house,and no record
of the transaction was deemed necessary.I am thus unable to trace your
descent and have been unable to obtain local information.

There is one family here by the name of Fleming,they were always
connected with this congragation and the head of the family was always
an Elder in it.I made all the inquiry in my power from the leading man
of the family,Thomas Fleming.The family residence is Knockacononey,his
father's name was Josias and the family names generally have
been,William,George,Josias,Thomas,David,and James.He has no remembrance
of any of your family but he remembers a Robert Fleming who has a fine
property on the hill on which I reside,Loy Hill.He had seven sons,and
there were originally one,and he is quite confident that the Malcom
Fleming,of whom you speak was a relation of theirs.He says they all came
from Scotland,from Largs,and purchased a large property in County Derry
about 5 miles from this,and near the town of Moneymore.They came about
1643 and did so in troublous times.You may feel interested to know
something od this district.Cookstown is regarded as the centre of
Ulster.It is equally distant from the coast towns of
Derry,Coleaine,Belfast and Newry.It contains about 4000 inhabitants.It
is dependent on the district for it's trade being 40 miles from sea.

It has now two railways from Belfast,one coming around by Toone Bridge
the northern boundary of Lough Neagh,and the other by Vernes Bridge the
southern boundary,as the Lough ( Lake ) from which we are distant 8
miles lies right between Belfast and us.

Cookstown consists of one long broad street,100 feet wide and one-half
mile long,with two cross streets.The only manufacturing we have is a
flax spinning mill and two weaving factories,all of linen.

The town is built on three townlands.The old part is in the townland of
Cookstown,In the center is the townland of Loy and on the south the
townlands of Gurtalowry.The whole is in the Parish of Derryloran.It was
at one time almost entirely a presbyterian population,and being central
was the common place of meeting of the synod of the church.For example
for 13 years in succession without a break the synod of Ulster met in my
church.at that time every man came on horseback but in the modern life
the synod or assembly must be held in a large place to which all railway
carriages go.Latterly the Roman Catholic population has greatly
increased.

The one Presbyterian congregation has become three.One of them called a
Secession Church,and the third one resulted from a quarel as to the
choice of minister when the defeated party withdrew and built a new
church for the man they sought to obtain.

I am the minister of the old congregation.The church,manse,and schools
are enclosed in a large paling.The whole block being in the center of
town.

The burying ground is at the Gartalowry end of the town where the Ruins
of a Church Stand,called Derryloran burying ground.The dust of ages lies
there unknown to fame.Tombstones were erected,but in time they are
broken and others take their place.The whole has been so crowded that we
have applied for a regular cemetery and at the present a contract has
been declared for building walls around a large plat of ground which has
been purchased.

Very probably your ancestors were in Derryloran.From time immemorial,it
has been used and just for that reason people refused to leave it and
prefered to pile their dead heap upon heap,till public decency and
sanitary laws could stand the strain no longer.Amid all the turmoil of
Ireland it's riots,disloyalty ans anarchy,Cookstown district has
remained loyal and Obedient to law.Life is as safe as in ant part of the
world,and there are many earnest and devout children of God.Our rural
population is thinning,farms are enlarging and emigration to America and
elsewhere flows in steady current.

Yours truly,
H.B.Wilson
Minister of First Presbyterian Church,
Cookstown,Tyrone County.
To E.M.Fleming
Belvidere,New Jersy

>From the information so beautifully expressed and so kindly furnished by
the good minister in this letter,there is still a strong family of
Flemings residing in the old parish town.By the characteristics of
superior physical development,courge,church membership and family
names,I have no doubt they are the same family of Flemings.Malcolm had a
brother David still living in1758,as the following letter from David
Lindsey proves.So that the names of Thomas,William,James,and David are
all quite familiar.It is interesting to note that the family was blessed
in the old church with a minister Alexander Fleming from it's own ranks.

Largs the town in Scotland from which this Fleming family are therein
said to have moved to Moneymore,five miles from Cookstown in County
Derry,is a seaport town in Scotland,in the county of Ayr,beautifully
situated on the Bay of Ayr,20 miles southwest of Glascow.It Has a
population now of 4,000.It is the County of Wigton the ancient
possessions of the Malcom Fleming,Earl of Wigton.In the neglected pile
of musty records recovered by Elisha M.Fleming,was an ancient
letter,brown with age,which in some mysterious manner crossed the ocean
and reached it's proper destination under the address of Mr.Thomas
Fleming or Andrew Fleming,Pennsillvena",neither of whomwere in the wilde
wilderness of that mountain girt domain.We copy it here as an important
document in the family story:
Louella Rosselott


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