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From: Dewey <>
Subject: Re: [ORANGEBURGH_SC] White Hill/Jenkins Hill/Hoffman Springs
Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2011 07:38:46 -0800 (PST)
In-Reply-To: <COL116-W215A0CAE461252783F1DA3B1D60@phx.gbl>


Could you tell me if Marquis J. JENKINS is related to the Jenkins family in your email?

Thanking you in advance,
Dewey Snyder

Marquis J. JENKINS was born on 28 Mar 1827. He died on 20 Feb 1899 and is buried in Santee Baptist Cemetery, Elloree, South Carolina. He married Margaret (Maggie) SNIDER, daughter of Deacon Jacob SNIDER and Mary (Polly) Till. She was born on 01 May 1834 in Elloree, Orangeburg, South Carolina, USA. She died on 31 May 1893 and is buried in the Santee Baptist Cemetery, Elloree, South Carolina.

Children of Marquis J. JENKINS and Margaret (Maggie) SNIDER-Jenkins are:
Edwin J. JENKINS.
Isaac Hunt JENKINS.
Louisa Janett JENKINS.


--- On Sun, 2/20/11, Mary Hutto <> wrote:

> From: Mary Hutto <>
> Subject: [ORANGEBURGH_SC] White Hill/Jenkins Hill/Hoffman Springs
> To: "Orangeburgh" <>, "Orangeburg" <>
> Date: Sunday, February 20, 2011, 1:32 PM
>
> The attached info pertains to the White Hill plantation
> that was located outside Orangeburg.  I've put info
> that was shared with me by a descendant.  Does anyone
> know where was  the location of the original plantation
> home? 
> We know where the cemetery is located.
> Does anyone have any info on a Hoffman Springs that may
> have also been in that general area. 
> Is there a plat anywhere that would show the land
> boundaries and possible home location in relation to the
> cemetery?
>
> Thanks
> mary
>
>
>
>
> Dr. J . G. Jenkins ... son of Rev. James Jenkins, formerly
> of the S.C. Conference, was born March 24th, 1805, and died
> ... at Orangeburg, Aug. 10th, 1866 ... a Methodist ... for
> 25 years he labored as a practitioner in St. Matthews
> parish, and after giving up the practice of medicine, he
> turned his attention to his farming interest and became one
> of the best farmers of his district.  In '62 and '63 he
> represented Orange Parish in the state legislature...
> Hemorrhage of the lungs was the first harbinger of his
> coming dissolution .. His wife and eight surviving children
> have lost a devoted husband and father, and the country a
> useful citizen ... interred with Masonic honors ...
>
> The Carolina Times - 1/13/1867
> ==============================================================
> The Orangeburgh District (SC) 1850 Census, Lexington
> Genealogical Association, Edited and indexed by L. H. Buff,
> Jr., 1998
> ORANGEBURG DISTRICT (SC) 1850 CENSUS, Section B, Between
> Santee and Edisto North of Belleville Road
>
> Enumerated 12 Nov 1850 to 26 Dec 1850
> J. J. Salley, Ass't Marshall
> 003B.
> James G. Jenkins, 45 m, Farmer, $550
> Eliza, 23 f (second wife)
> Julia A., 15 f
> James H., 11 m
> Mary E., 8 f
> Lewis, 6 m
> Anna F., 4 f
> George M., 1/12 m (child with second wife)
> ==============================================================
> An account of the tornado appeared in the Charleston
> Mercury, May 7, 1861
> S.C. Historical Magazine Volume 48 1947 - 156 page
> Diary of Samuel Edward Burges 1860-1862
>
> Tuesday, May 7
> "Heard of more destruction from tornado.  Dr. Jenkins
> place in ruins, narrowly escaped with his life.  2
> Negroes killed.  Took cars about 1 p.m.  Soon
> passed the scene of tornado.  Trees demolished. 
> Reached Columbia after 4 p.m.  Put up at Hunts and went
> about among my friends."
> ===============================================================
> James Gwyn Jenkins
> James Gwyn B. D. Jenkins was a physician who practiced in
> Orangeburgh District before the Confederate War.  He
> was born in 1806, the son of the Reverend James and
> Elizabeth Ann Gwyn Jenkins.
>
> Dr. Jenkins was married first to Elizabeth Moorer and
> second to her sister, Electra Moorer.  He and his
> family lived in the village of Orangeburgh, where he
> practiced for many years.  He died in August 10, 1866,
> at age sixty and was buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery in
> Orangeburgh.
>
> Refers to O'Cain Family Bible in the possession of Frances
> McCraw Kennedy
> Ref: Orangeburgh District, 1768 - 1868, History and
> Records, Daniel Marchant Culler, Reprint Company,
> Spartanburg, SC, 1995
> ===============================================================
>
> White Hill Plantation – Orangeburg – Orangeburg County
>
> Location – Orangeburg, St Matthews Parish, Orangeburg
> County
> Original plantation lands were located about six miles from
> the city of Orangeburg off US 601, right before the Calhoun
> County line.
> Other names – Jenkins Hill
>
>
> Timeline
> 1799 – Dr. Van De Vastine Jamison owned White Hill
> Plantation.
> Dr. Jamison was born on March 24, 1765 in Bucks County,
> Pennsylvania. He was in South Carolina by 1792 and was
> counted in the 1790 Census. He was listed as the only person
> in his household - unmarried and owning no slaves (Neuffer,
> bk. 2, vol. 13, p. 53).  On January 22, 1799 he married
> Elizabeth Rumph. They made White Hill their home (Jamison
> Family).
> 1809 – Dr. Van De Vastine Jamison purchased 92 acres in
> the vicinity of White Hill. The area was referred to as
> Little Bool Swamp which is probably present-day Bull Swamp.
> It is assumed that he added this acreage to White Hill
> (Jamison Family).
> 1810 – Dr. Van De Vastine Jamison did not like the fact
> that a public road ran directly through his property. He
> petitioned the legislature to alter the route (Neuffer, bk.
> 2, vol. 13, p. 52).
> 1814 – Elizabeth Rumph Jamison died (Jamison Family).
> 1820 – A plat shows Dr. Van de Vastine Jamison as the
> owner of White Hill (Culler, p. 384).
> 1825 – Dr. Jamison was harvesting the oyster shells on
> his property. He burned down the shells to produce lime.
> Lime was used in the Carolinas for building materials and
> for indigo making.
>
> Robert Mills wrote of a peculiar sort of oyster shell found
> there which was longer than those found at the seashore. "In
> Dr. Jamison's plantation . . . ten hands can raise in a week
> as many of these oyster shells, from their bed, though seven
> feet below the surface as when burnt, will yield twelve
> hundred bushels of lime." In writing of the geology of
> Orangeburg District, he added: "Considerable bodies of the
> compact stone rock run through the district from northeast
> to southwest. Jamison is the only one that has attended to
> this rock so as to derive any advantage from quarrying and
> burning it. He has been for many years engaged in supplying
> the demands of the district for lime, both for building and
> for indigo making, for which it answers very well. The lime
> made is of an excellent quality. Dr. J. makes about 3000
> bushels annually, and, could he find sale for it, could
> prepare ten times as much" (Neuffer, bk. 2, vol. 13, p.
> 53-54).
>
>
> 1833 – On February 22, Dr. Jamison released title to
> "White Hill plantation, all negro slaves, horses, cattle,
> hogs and farming utensils to John A. Tyler and Van De
> Vastine Samuel Jamison" (Neuffer, bk. 2, vol. 13, p. 53).
> 1836 – Dr. Jamison on December 15 at Pine Grove
> Plantation in St Matthews Parish. His body was brought to
> White Hill and buried in the family cemetery. He was 71
> years old (Jamison Family).
> 1844 – On January 20, John A. Tyler and Elizabeth Tyler
> sold White Hill to Dr. Willis Wilkinson, a Charleston
> physician.
> The plantation consisted of 1,395 acres. The family
> cemetery was excluded in the sale of the property. That
> tract of land was reserved for the Jamison family (Neuffer,
> bk. 2, vol. 13, p. 53).
> 1849 – On September 21, Dr. Willis Wilkinson sold White
> Hill to Dr. James Jenkins. During his ownership the
> plantation was known as Jenkins' Hill (Neuffer, bk. 2, vol.
> 13, p. 53).
> ? – The plantation house was damaged by a storm before
> 1900 and was subsequently deserted (Neuffer, bk. 2, vol. 13,
> p. 53).
> Land
> Number of acres – 1,395 in 1844
>
>
>
> The Jamison Family Cemetery is located on Belleville Road
> about five miles northeast of the city of Orangeburg
> (Jamison Family).
>
> References:
> Daniel Marchant Culler, Orangeburg District 1768-1868
> History and Records (Spartanburg, SC: The Reprint Company,
> 1995).
> Claude Henry Neuffer (editor), Names in South Carolina,
> 1943-1983 (Columbia, SC: The State Printing Company).
>    
>         
>           
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