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Archiver > OREGON-TRAIL > 2001-08 > 0998357233


From: "W. Stephen Jenkins" <>
Subject: Huntington - Hayes wagon train
Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 21:31:57 -0400


Below is a memoir written by my great-great grandmother Martha
Huntington Hayes

WILLIAM WASHINGTON HAYES and MARTHA HUNTINGTON HAYES
and Family. "Early Pioneers of Coos County, Oregon."

"William Washington Hayes was born February 26, 1826, in Shelby County,
Indiana. His parents, James and Amanda Jane Jackson Hayes, being of
Irish
descent. They came form County Cork, Ireland. (The) Other children in
the
family were Thomas, Jackson, Sarah and James.

His maternal grandfather, James Jackson, was High Sheriff of County
Cork, and
(the Jacksons) were land owners in that county: the land belonged to
their
heirs, as long as grass grows and water runs.

In 1847 William Washington Hayes married Martha Huntington, who was
(also)
born in Shelby County, Indiana, (on) October 14, 1828, and was of
English-Welsh descent. Her parents were James and Mariah Huntington;
other
children in the family were Daniel, William, Martha, Ozi Curtis, James,
Samuel, Lydia, Annette, Jacob and Joseph. Her great-great grandparents,
Simon
and Margaret Huntington and family, crossed the ocean from England in
1633.
Simon, the father, died enroute and was buried at sea; the wife and
children
settled in Norwhichtown, Connecticut; the children were Samuel, James
and
Nancy. Samuel Huntington, great grandfather of Martha Huntington Hayes,
was
(a) signer of the Declaration of Independence and was Governor of
Connecticut
for eight years or until his death in 1794.

William and Martha Hayes were parents of seven children, namely; Amanda
Jane,
Maria Lydia, Sarah, Cynthia Ann, James Samuel, Everett Edward and Mary
Willena.

Mr. Hayes and his wife and three little girls, Amanda, Maria and Sarah,
crossed the plains, leaving Indiana in 1852, with ox team; enduring all
the
hardships and sorrows, as Mr. Hayes with others suffered from Cholera
and they
lost there baby Sarah, and buried (sic) her somewhere in what is now
northern
Nevada. After many trials they finally reached Monticello, Washington
Territory, and settled on the Cowlitz River, taking homestead at Castle
Rock
on the river where a colony which was made up of mostly of Huntington
families
and a few friends who crossed with theirs; there were seventeen wagons
in the
train; James and Mariah Huntington, parents of Martha Hayes and several
of her
brothers were in the train.

Each one conducted some business or did farming or took part in the
Territorial Government; James Huntington, (father of Martha Hayes) was
the
first Sheriff of the Territory. Curtis Huntington (Martha Hayes'
brother) was
a minister of the Christian Church-- most of the clan were members of
that
church. Children born in Washington Territory were Cynthia, James,
Everett
and Mary.

Mr. Hayes conducted a Mercantile Business in Monticello for about
sixteen
years. The Cowlitz River over-flowed one year and washed all the stores
along
the bank, down stream --- Mr. Hayes had just sold his store to a
relative and
they took row boats and reclaimed some dress goods, etc. James
Huntington
founded an Insane Asylum at Freeport and Mr. and Mrs. Hayes were
superintendants there for about three years.

In 1868 Mr. Hayes and family moved to Oakland, Douglas County, Oregon
for
several years, and he conducted a Mercantile Business there for several
years. He also did book keeping for several firms. In 1892 he was
elected
Treasurer of Coos County, which office he held for three terms. He was
Treasurer when the County Seat was moved from Empire City, on Coos Bay,
to
Coquille on the Coquille River.

After the expiration of his term of office he retired to private life
and he
and his wife moved to Bandon, Oregon for several years; Mrs. Hayes died
in
Bandon, July 21, 1906. Mr. Hayes died June 28, 1909 in Marshfield,
Oregon.
An old friend and Minister of the Christian Church, S. B. Hollenbeak,
conducted funeral services for both Mr. and Mrs. Hayes in the Christian
Church; Mrs. Hayes body was the first to be taken to the Cemetery in
the
first hearse that was over in Coquille; it being a large black vehicle
with a
square top and a large pom-pom of feathers on each corner. Both Mr. and
Mrs.
Hayes were laid to rest in the Masonic Cemetery, near Coquille, and now
have a
grave marker; they are laid in the Snyder plot by the three children of
John
and Amanda Hayes Snyder--William, Herbert and Martha Snyder. All died
from
diphtheria a few days apart--all were small children.

Mr. and Mrs. Hayes and their children were members of the Christian
Church
and their home was always open to Ministers of the Gospil (sic) and
needy
folk. They were both members, also some of their children and all
attended
church in the little old building that still stands on Fourth St.
between
Coulter and Heath Streets in Coquille, Oregon. Mr. Hayes had a fine
tenor
voice and was song leader for church services for many years. He was a
member
and ardent worker in the Knights of Templer Lodge.

Mrs. Hayes was very well versed in the Holy Scripture, being able to
quote
chapters and verses from memory. Every night after retiring--a lamp on
the
table by the bed--and her little white night cap on her head--she would
read a
portion of scripture.

Grandfather prided himself on putting the crying grand children to
sleep
using his various motions and Indian chants.

We grand children always wanted grandmother to make "scraped gathers"
in our
dresses, which she could do so well. No one ever baked as good bread.
as
Grandma and we (sic) were allowed to eat the crusty ends off when the
loaf was
still warm.

Two finer Christian people ever lived and they were ever ready to help
others
and their home was always open to friends and to the Ministry.

Grandma Hayes used to tell about what Great-grandma Hayes would tell
about
crossing the Atlantic from Ireland and the children all had whooping
cough
(which she called chin coff). Grandfather William Hayes was born after
the
family came to America--he being the youngest.

Great-grandmother Hayes told how her father James Jackson as High
Sheriff of
County Cork would gather the taxes from the farmers and bring it to his
home
and pour it in a large tub in the middle of the room and no one was
allowed to
enter---a'corden of troops guarded the house til all monies were
collected,
and being guarded by troops the money was then taken to the Kings
Palace."

End

Steve Jenkins
Roanoke, VA


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