PADUTCHgenONLY-L Archives

Archiver > PADUTCHgenONLY > 1999-10 > 0941125294


From: <>
Subject: [PaDgo] Tulpehocken History and Surnames
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 1999 11:41:34 EDT


Friends ...

I have seen several Tulpehocken queries lately and offer this summary
which was shared with me several years ago. There are three lists of
surnames contained within the text.

Happy hunting .... Dick


The Swatara, a tributary of the Susquehanna, led to the Tulpehocken Creek,
which "fed" into Lancaster Co. Now, a distinct area of research within Berks
and Lancaster and the larger area.

When the Palatinites in NY ( ltr PG - PA Germans) got fed up w/the British
attitudes toward them, Weiser and others began to look for other/better
places to settle. Apparently, Wm. Penn's folks had contacted them, offering
land in the western part of PA. Seemingly, the ulterior motive for the Penns
was to provide themselves (in eastern PA) a westerly buffer betw/against the
Indians. But the PA authorities didn't throw down so many roadblocks against
German settlement, as did the Brits (who'd allowed only 10 acres per; not
sufficient for subsistence farming.)

The story of the Palatinites' migration is mythical! (You might like to
order Earl W. Ibach's "map" I mentioned in my other msg.) Last summer, Jerry
(my hus) and I drove the trace of that migration fr Schoharie in just a few
hours. To think how those folks went across land and by water, and the
second group drove their livestock across country, defies imagination.

At any rate, Conrad Weiser (father and son) knew about the Tulpehocken area
of Berks Co. thru numerous contacts with the Indian people of that area, and
trips made to the region. I don't know how long the negotiations w/the
Pennsylvanians took, but the decision was finally made to make the move to
the Tulpehocken. A petition exists which names those original migrants.

(At this point, Art, I'll copy in some research that a cousin of mine did.
It will make the msg quite lengthy, but until I know if you can receive
"files," this will have to do.)

I just returned from the Berks County Historical Society where I copied down
some information regarding the emigration of New York Palatines to
Pennsylvania in 1723

The Palatines who settled in New York found the living conditions to be poor.
In 1723, 33 families left New York and, upon the invitation of Governor
William Keith of Pennsylvania, settled in the Tulpehocken area. The
following is a petition to Governor Keith from these Palatinates who would
eventually settle along the Tulpehocken creek.
"To his excellency, William Keith, Baronet, Governor of Pennsylvania, &c, &c,
the Honourable Council
The petition to us, the subscribers, being thirty-three families in number,
at present inhabiting Tulpehocken creek
Humbly Sheweth,
That your petitioners being natives of Germany, about 15 years ago, were by
the great goodness and royal bounty of her late majesty, Queen Anne, relieved
from the hardships which they then suffered in Europe, and were transported
into the colony of New York, where they settled. But the families
increasing, being in that Government confined to the scanty allowance of ten
acres of land to each family, whereon they could not well subsist. Your
petitioners being informed of the kind reception which their countrymen
usually meet with in the
Province of Pennsylvania, and hoping they might, with what substance they
had, acquire larger settlements in that Province, did last year (in the
spring of 1723), leave their settlements in New York Government, and come
with their families into this Province, where, upon their arrival, they
applied themselves to his excellency, the Governor, who, of his great
goodness, permitted them to inhabit upon Tulpahaca Creek, on condition that
they should make full satisfaction to the proprietor or his agents, for such
lands as should be alloted to them, when they were ready to recieve the same.
And now, your petitioners, understanding that some gentlemen, agents of the
proprietor, have ample power to dispose of lands in this province. And we,
your petitioners, being willing and ready to purchase, do humbly beseech your
Excellency and council to recommend us to the favorable usage of the
proprietors agents, that upon paying the usual prices for lands at such
distance from Philadelphia, we may have sufficient rights and titles made to
us for such lands as we shall have occasion to buy, that our children may
have some settlement to depend on hereafter, and that by your authority we
may
be freed from the demands of the Indians of that part of the country, who
pretend a right thereto. And we humbly beg leave to inform your Excellency
and council, that there are fifty families more who, if they may be admitted
upon the same conditions, are desirous to come and settle with us. We hope
for your favorable answer to this our humble request, and as in duty bound
shall ever pray, &c."
JOHANNES YANS JOHANNES CLAES SHAVER
PETER RITT JO. HAMELAR RITT
CONRAD SCHITZ ANTONIS SHARB
PALTUS UNSF JOHAN PETER PACHT
TORITINE SERBO JOCHAM MICHAEL CRICHT
JOSAP SAB SEBASTIAN PISAS
JORGE RITT ANDREW FALBORN
GODFREYT FILLER

The above, as well as the portion to follow, is taken from "The German
Emigration from New York Province into Pennsylvania: Part V of a narrative
prepared at the request of the Pensylvania German Society" by Rev. Matthias
Henry Richards, D.D. and presented in 1899.

This next section deals with the long journey from New York to Pennsylvania
which these original settlers made:
"Guided by the indians, and not under the leadership of either the elder
Weiser, or his gifted son, as some suppose, both of whom came later, the
pioneers of 1723, with much toil and labor, cut their way through the forest,
after which, with their wives, little ones and animals, they followed, by
day, the scanty track they had made in the woods and slept at the foot of
it's trees, wooed to slumber by its ceaseless noises, during the night, until
the forty or fifty miles, which seperated them from the (Susquehanna) river,
had been traversed. Then came the building and launching of the heavy rafts,
to contain their domestic utensils, and of the light and speedy canoes for
themselves, on which they were to continue their long journey to the haven of
rest, accompanied slowly by their cattle driven along the river's banks. As
forest and open space, trees, rocks, and sandy beach, succeeded each other
with tiresome monotony, and as camp-fire followed camp-fire at the close of
the day, they little reckoned that they had swept by the spots where the
flourishing towns of Binghamton and Oswega were, later, to stand.
As they rounded the curve where the Lackawanna joins the Susquehanna at
Pittston, who was the wizard of their number whose divining rod would point
to the priceless diamonds beneath them and tell them that their dumb animals
were treading underfoot riches of far greater value to mankind than all the
pearls and rubies for which the world was striving? Whose fancy amongst them
all could have pictured or imagined the beautiful city of Wilkes-Barre, and
the coal breakers everywhere rearing their heads into the air as though they
were indeed giants issuing from their long slumber in the bowels of the
earth? As they exchanged greetings with the Indians in their village of
Shamokin can it be that there rose up before any one of them a picture of the
hideous scenes of their near future, or any foresight of their murdered sons
and daughters and the blackened ruins of the homes towards which they were
hastening, or did the troubled dreams of any other reveal to him the fort at
Sunbury, no longer Shamokin, filled with its soldiers, and sound into his
astonished ears the booming of it's guns? Down the Grand stream, which was
bearing them, they slowly floated until their watchful eyes caught sight of a
long log cabin on its shores, where now stands the capitol city of
Pennsylvania, and, as they looked upon the home of John Harris, it is
altogether probable they saw, for the first time in all their journey, the
dwelling of a white man. Cheered by the sight on they went, until they came
to where the Swatara Creek joined it's waters with those of its mighty
brother, and at the spot where Middletown now stands, our wanderers at last
changed course and entered the stream which told them they were drawing near
the goal towards which they had been hastening for so many weary days. To
reach this goal was to endure a few more hardships and trials, and when, in
the lovely Tulpehocken (which means "land where the turtle sang and wooed")
region, nestling at the foot of the Blue Mountains and wavered by its
numerous streams, they pitched their camp for the last time, it was HOME.

Outside of the surrounding Indian villages, we have no record of previous
settlements, so that, in very truth, they had taken up "vacant lands"."
Thus is the connection of the Tulpehocken Settlement with the region of
Schoharie, New York.

Later, in the same paper, Rev. Richards writes:
"There were constant accensions to the number of the first feeble band. In
1728 other families left Schoharie
and settled (in Tulpehocken), amongst whom were:
LEONARD ANSPACH, CASPAR HOHN GEORGE SCHMIDT, GEORGE ZEH, JOHANNES NOECKER,
JOHANN JACOB HOLSTEINER, MICHAEL LAUER, ANDREAS KAPP, JACOB WERNER, JOHANN
PHILIP SCHNEIDER, JACOB KATTERMAN, JACOB LOWENGUT, HEINRICH SIX, PHILIP
THEIS, CONRAD SCHARF

At a later point in he work, Rev Richards writes:
"Before the erection of Berks County, in 1752, the township of Tulpehocken
was a recognized division, being a part of Lancaster County in 1729. Because
of its great size, in 1734, another township was laid off from it and
erected, called "Heidelberg" to commemorate that part of the fatherland from
whence many of the settlers came. The early inhabitants, therefore, of the
old townships of Heidelburg and Tulpehocken, were composed, mainly (though
not entirely) of the immigrants from New York Province.
Rupp names the following as amongst the first settlers:
JOHN ADAM DIFFEBACH, PETER LEBO, CHRISTIAN LOWER, CHRISTOPHER WEISER, JOHN
SPYCKER, GEORGE BEISTEIN, JACOB LEDERMAN, JACOB KETTERMAN, JACOB FISHER,
PETER ANSBACH, JOHN SOLLER, MICHAEL REID, JACOB SORBERT, HERMAN WALBORN,
FRANCIS WENRICH, FREDERICK REED, ULRICH SCHWARTZ, GEORGE LANDAUER, STEPHEN
CONRAD, HENRY BOYER, CONRAD SHERF, MARTIN STIP, JOHN LIVERGOOD, ABRAHAM
LAUCH, PETER SANNS, PETER SERBY, ADAM STEIN CASPAR RITT, JOHN EDWARDS,
PETER REED, GEORGE NULL, LENARD REES, JACOB LIVERGOOD, ADAM LESH, FRANCIS
PARVIN, PHILIP BROWN, HENRY SELLER, PETER SHEVER, LUDOWICK ANSBACH,FELTY
UNRUTH, GEORGE KING, JACOB MILLER, JOHN FOHRER, JACOB HUBELOR,
CHRISTOPHER KEISER, JACOB WILHELM, JOHN TRAUTMAN, JACOB BARTNER, MICHAEL
DETWEILER, NICHOLAS OLLY, NICHOLAS KINSER, JOHN HOVERSHEN, JOHN MOIR,
SIMON SCHERMAN, HENRY STEIN, JOHN RIEGEL, CHRISTIAN MOIR, JACOB SCHWANER,
GEORGE SHERMAN, HENRY MILLBERGER, PETER KEEPHART, WOLF MILLER, WILLIAM
KEYSER, GEORGE PAFFINBERGER, GEORGE JACOB SHERMAN, GEORGE KANTRICO,
GOTTFRIED ROHRER, DANIEL MOIR, JACOB HOFFMAN, MARTIN SCHELL, MATTHIAS
DOEBLER, ADAM JORDAN, GEORGE WOLF, JACOB TANTOR, BARTEL DISSINGER, JACOB
FULLMAN, GEORGE TALLINGER, MATTHIAS NOFFZIGER, JACOB REED, JOHN GEO.
MEIRSLEM, FREDERICK KAUFMAN, JACOB MILLER, CHRISTIAN FRANK, SIMON
BOGENREIF, RUDOLPH MOIR, ANDREW WOLLINBECK, MICHAEL KOFNER, GEORGE
GOTYMAN, GEORGE BROSIUS, HENRY REIDENBACH, JACOB BORTNER, JOHN BALSAR
SHEVER, JACOB CASERT, VALENTINE BRINDSEIL, CASPER REED, MARTIN WARNER,
CHRISTOPHER ULRICH, WILIAM BRATH, JOHANN JACOB SNELBY, GOTTFRIED FITLER,
MATHIAS BRICKER, PETER MINK, JOHN PONTIUS, CASPER STUMP, PETER CRISER,
MATHIAS WAGNER, DANIEL LUCAS, NICHOLAS HAMBER,
WILLIAM KEYSER, NICHOLAS MILLER, PHILIP GEBHART, GEORGE WEAVER, GEORGE
ULRICH FISHER, PHILIP MEADE, WILLIAM DIELER, JOHN PHILIP BUNGER, CONRAD
REBER, GEORGE CHRIST, VALENTINE BUNGARDNER, CONRAD WIRTH, NICHOLAS LANG,
THOMAS KERN, FREDERICK STAP, MATHIAS SHEFER, VALENTINE NEU, JOHN RIDNORE,
CHRISTIAN KURTZ, JACOB STOUGH, JOHN EBBERTS, JOHN GEORGE MATS, MICHAEL
ALBERTS, WILLIAM SASSAMAN, PETER LAUX, ADAM REHM, PETER KRIEGER, JOHN
ADAM WEAVER, JOHN WEISER, JACOB HOUKSVERT

There are histories you should be able to obtain via "inter library loan."
Perhaps some of our Tulpers could recommend some.

Re Tulp Gp - (c. 1996 e-mailers) it's a group of folks who share an interest
in PG surnames, mainly in the Tulpehocken area of Berks and Lancaster Co.'s.
With many of the families, however, the range quickly became much wider, as
counties were quickly erected in that original area - now incl: Lebanon,
Dauphin, York, Adams, etc.

This thread: