PAGE-L Archives

Archiver > PAGE > 2000-09 > 0969662077


From: "George W. Page" <>
Subject: [PAGE] Part 1 - Sir Richard Page, "Ye Noble Richard," fl. 1536 (LONG)
Date: Fri, 22 Sep 2000 18:34:37 -0400


I recommend expanding to full screen width before reading this LONG message.

In 1917 Charles Nash Page in his Page Genealogy Chart #1 (and probably in
his book, "History & gen. of the Page fam. from 1257 to the present, with a
brief hist. & gen. of the allied fams." Nash & Peck, by C.N. Page. 143p.,
1911) incorrectly identified a Sir Richard Page, Knight (who was referred
to by King Henry VIII as "Ye Noble Richard") as the progenitor of several
of the Pages from Sudbury Court in the parish of Harrow, county Middlesex,
Eng.. The chart shows Sir Richard Page to be the brother of Henry Page of
Wembley who m.(2) Constance Hodder (sic, Hoddesdon according to his 1558
PCC will) and the father of children Rowland Page; Thomas Page; Agnes Page
who m. a Thornton; Dorothy Page who m. William Gerard; and William Page by
his wife Alice __?__. This long message corrects the historical record
about Sir Richard Page, Knt. and his descendants, which have been
incorrectly attributed to "Ye Noble Richard" over the years by several
family historians.

The Sir Richard Page of King Henry's Court was in personal attendance upon
the King's natural son, Henry Fitzroy, and he is mentioned in a letter
written by Wolsey to the king in 1525 as having devised the armorial
bearings for the boy, who had been created Duke of Richmond. His name also
occurs as Vice-Chamberlain of the Dule's household. He was afterwards
captain of the king's bodyguard, and enjoyed the favour of the Court, as
Cromwell writes to Wolsey, "Mr. Page received your letter directed to my
Lady Ann [Boleyn] and will deliver the same. She gave him kind words, but
will not promise to speak to the king for you." He was knighted on 3
November 1529 at King of York Palace, now Whitehall, and received a gift of
crest and arms quarterly on 1 February 1530/1 from Benolt [Harry Rylands,
Esq. "Grantees of Arms Named in Docquets and Patents To The End of The
Seventeenth Century (Harleian Society, 1915, p. 188)]
He also received the Priority of Thorby in county Essex at the Dissolution.

Sir Richard and the poet Sir Thomas Wyatt, who wrote the first English
sonnets to Anne Bullen/Boleyn a generation before Shakespeare was born,
were sent to the Tower of London on 5 May 1536 on suspicion of having been
Anne's lovers. Both were set free on the advise of Thomas Cromwell, Earl of
Essex, because the affairs with Anne took place prior to her marriage to
Henry VIII. The same source states that Sir Richard Page was "connected
with the Fitzwilliams and the Russells." These people were: Sir William
Fitzwilliam, kt. 1513, 1st Earl of Southampton in 1537; and, Sir John
Russell, kt. 1513, Lord Russell 1539, created Earl of BEDFORD 1550, who
were both Keepers of the Privy Seal of Henry VIII. [J.D. Mackie, "The
Earlier Tudors 1485-1558," (Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press,
1993), p. 647]. After his close call he was banished from the court and
the presence of King Henry VIII, and he supposedly located in Essex where
he supposedly died c. 1558 according to CN Page in 1917. In truth Sir
Richard Page m .Elizabeth, the daughter of Sir Fulk Bourchier, Knt. 2nd
Barion Fitz-Warine, who was summoned to parliament on 19August 1472. This
nobleman m. Elizabeth, a sister and heiress of John, Lord Dynham. Elizabeth
m. 1st to Sir Edward Stanhope, Knt., and 2ndly, to Sir Richard Page, knt."

Elizabeth Bourchier/Stanhope and Sir Richard Page had a daughter, Elizabeth
Page, who was their only daughter and heiress (i.e., they had no surviving
sons or other daughters!). He was referred to as the "right honorable Sir
Richard Page, knt. of Beechwood, in the county of Hertford, of the privy
council of King Henry VIII." The daughter, Elizabeth Page, m. as his first
wife Sir William Skipwith of Ormesby, Lincolnshire who received his
knighthood in the Battle of Muscleborough, 1st (year of reign) of Edward
VI. In the 6th of the same reign he was returned to parliament by the
county of Lincoln, and was sheriff, in the 4th (year of reign) of Queen
Elizabeth. [ [John Burke, Esq., "Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland,"
Vol. 1 "History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland" (London:
1834-1838, reprinted Baltimore: Clearfield {Genealogical Publishing Co.,
1977}, p. 604]

Here's what I found out about the Stanhope family:

(Stanhope) "Edward (Sir) of Rampton, who received the honor of knighthood
upon the field of battle from Henry VII for his distinguished conduct
against the Cornish rebels. Sir Edward wedded first, Avelina, daughter of
Sir Gervase Clifton, K.B. by whom he had two sons, Richard and Michael. He
m. secondly, Elizabeth, daughter of Fulk Bourchier, Lord Fitzwarine, and
had only one daughter Anne, the second wife of Protector Somerset. Richard
Stanhope, the elder son of Sir Edward, leaving at his decease in 1529, a
daughter only, the male line was continued by his brother (the second son)
Sir Michael Stanhope, an eminent person in the reign of Henry VIII, who
obtained from that monarch, a grant of the house and site of the monastery
of Shelford." [Ibid., p. 467.]

Now the interesting part concerning the Bourchier family:
Sir Fulk Bourchier, Knt. 2nd Barion Fitz-Warine, who was summoned to
parliament on 19August 1472. This nobleman m. Elizabeth, a sister and
heiress of John, Lord Dynham, and had issue, John his successor; Joane, m.
James, Lord Audley; Elizabeth m. 1st to Sir Edward Stanhope, Knt., and
2ndly, to Sir Richard Page, knt."

Elizabeth Bourchier/Stanhope and Sir Richard Page had a daughter, Elizabeth
Page, who was their only daughter and heiress (i.e., they had no surviving
sons or daughters!). He was referred to as the "right honorable Sir Richard
Page, knt. of Beechwood, in the county of Hertford, of the privy council of
King Henry VIII." The daughter, Elizabeth Page, m. as his first wife Sir
William Skipwith of Ormesby, etc. (including co. Lincoln) who received his
knighthood in the Battle of Muscleborough, 1st (year of reign) of Edward
VI. In the 6th of the same reign he was returned to parliament by the
county of Lincoln, and was sheriff, in the 4th (year of reign) of Queen
Elizabeth. [Ibid., p. 604]

Now the Skipwith family, first from John Burke, Esq., "A Genealogical and
Heraldic History of the Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies of England,
Ireland, and Scotland" (2nd Edition, London: 1841, reprinted Baltimore:
Genealogical Publishing Co., 1977), pp. 486-489:

William Skipwith, Esq. who was the only son of Henry Skipwith, third son
(and only one with male heirs) of Sir Richard Skipwith, knt. of Ormesby,
Lincolnshire, who m. Mary, a daughter of Sir Ralph Chamberlain, knt. of
Gidding, in Suffolk. William Skipwith, Esq. m. Elizabeth, daughter of
Richard Redding, Esq, of Harrow on the Hill, and was survived by his son
Fulwar Skipwith.

Sir Richard Page's coat of arms was: Sable, a fess between three doves
argent membered gules. [A. R. Warner, Richmond Herald, "Papworth's Ordinary
of British Armorials" Reproduced from the original edition of 1874 (London:
Tabard Publications), p. 729]. Note that there was NO bordure, the fess was
not dancette'e, and they are not quartered!

His crest: Out of a ducal coronet per pale or and gules (another, gules and
or) a demi griffin salient per pale, counterchanged, beaked of the second.
The doves and tincture in the arms and the griffin in the crest more
closely resemble those of the Pages of Kent than they do those of Middlesex
(Wembley) which were in general: Or, a fess dancettee between three
martlets azure (or sable), a border of the last [Burke's The General
Armory, p. 770 and H. Society, Vol. LXV, Middlesex Pedigrees, p. 20, which
shows the arms of a "John Page of Wembley" in the parish of Harrow by
Clarenceux Camden; and another "John Page of Wembley": Sable a chevron
between three martlets, argent in the same reference]. Clearly there were
two cadet lines of Pages living in Wembley!

The arms and crest are almost identical with those of Peter Page, Esq.,
Justice of the Peace of East Sheen, co. Surrey who was no doubt related to
Sir Richard. On the other hand, the crest of Col. John Page of Virginia and
Francis Page of East Bedfont were: A demi-horse forcene (rearing) per pale
dancette'e or and azure.

Continued in Part II.


This thread: