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From:
Subject: [Poca] Chellowe Plantation-John Bolling
Date: Sat, 26 May 2001 15:48:52 EDT


Thought you all might be interested in the following. The description was
written in the 1930's by the WPA. The site listings contains photo of
Chellowe in Buckingham County Virginia. The house is currently in use by
private owneship.


Tom Almquist
*********************
http://image.vtls.com/VHI/P/04/0124.jpg

http://image.vtls.com/VHI/P/04/0125.jpg

Notes:

Location: One mile south of Dillwyn VA on Hwy #15, thence four miles
west on Route #629, thence one mile south on Route #623. House is about
fifty yards east of the highway.

Date: 1749

Owners:

Colonel John Bolling 1748
Colonel Robert Bolling about 1795
Leaneus Bolling about 1835
Colonel Robert Hubbard 1848
Colonel Robert Hubbard II 1875
Heirs of the above 1920
Robert Hubbard III present owner

Description: Chellowe Plantation is a part of a grant of 6,740 acres
originally in Albemarle County, now in Buckingham County, Virginia.
Patented to Col. John Bolling, July 20, 1748. Chellowe is named for an
old English estate of the Bollings.
The home is a very imposing example of colonial architecture, consisting
of ten rooms. You enter the front by the way of a "T" shaped hall, to
the right as you enter is a very large bedroom, to the left a large
library or living room, to the center is a door leading to a lovely
dining room with french windows, lovely old doors with locks on them
that were imported from England with brass keys. A side hall lead to
the rear of the house. A lovely wide, winding stair leads to the
upstairs hall. In this hall is built in bookcases with many valuable
books. In the center of this hall are double doors leading to an upper
porch with french windows on either side of the door. The porch runs
about three fourths the length of the house. The upper porch has an
unusual type of balustrade, and columns reaching to the eaves of the
house. There are three very large bedrooms on the second floor. The
rooms are all plastered and most have a large fireplace in them. No one
is living in the house at the present, but it is beautifully kept by the
caretaker, he being a son of one of the old slaves of the Hubbard
family.
The "old kitchen" still stands, but has been restored, in the east
corner of the yard. There was once a covered walkway leading from the
kitchen to the main house to protect the food from weather. The yard is
a thing of beauty, it contains two acres and is in perfect condition.
Many of the old trees still stand, among them is a large oak, twenty odd
feet in circumference, the sole survivor of the original trees that
shaded the spacious lawn. Aunt Mary Bollings garden was known through
the country as one of the most beautiful of its day, there are still
signs of it, some of the old roses still bloom there. The beautiful
situation, the secluded location, the old house spring from which an
abundance of crystal water flows, the tall trees, the extensive view,
the gorgeous sunset beyond the mountains, the very atmosphere of the
place, its history and traditions, all combine to make Chellowe a
delightful, restful abode in these days of hurry, worry and painful
uncertainty.

Historical Significance: Many men of prominence have lived at
Chellowe. The Bollings held many state offices, also held responsible
positions in the United States Army. The Hubbard's have always been
noted for their brilliancy, hospitality and good manners. They have
served Buckingham many years as representatives, doctors, lawyers and
many other professions. E. W. Hubbard was Commonwealth attorney for
Buckingham for about forty years. The Hubbards are very proud of the
fact they are descendants of Pocahontas.


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