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Archiver > POYTHRESS > 2005-12 > 1134443578


From: "Michael Tutor" <>
Subject: Mr. Robert Poythress, of Prince George County
Date: Mon, 12 Dec 2005 22:12:58 -0500


Peter, David, Joshua and Robert were the easiest brothers to document...if
there was ever anything easy about documenting the Poythress family. Peter's
daughter, Anne, provided the family tie to the Bland family through her
marriage to Richard Bland. Richard's and Anne's daughter, Elizabeth Bland,
married Peter Poythress, of Branchester, the son of Robert and Elizabeth
Poythress. Joshua Poythress' line is always associated with the Flowerdew
Plantation.

The Third Generation: Mr. Robert Poythress, of Prince George County
R. Bolling Batte on Robert Poythress
[28 Robert Poythress (1690 - c. 1747), m. Elizabeth, last name unknown.
Robert left a will dated 24 May 1743, now lost, but quoted from in a deed
given by his daughter Tabitha in 1793.
284 Jane Poythress. Supposedly married John Baird. He came from Scotland c.
1750 and settled at City Point.
285 Tabitha Poythress (1725 - 1805), m. 1742 Henry Randolph (1721 - 1771) of
Chesterfield County, son of Henry and Elizabeth (Epes 121 5) Randolph. There
were eight children. In 1793, Tabitha made a deed conveying her interest in
some slaves to Henry Archer. The deed recited that her father Robert
Poythress 28 had by his will dated 24 May 1743 left some slaves to his wife
(Tabitha's mother) and after his wife's death the slaves were to go in (sic)
his (Robert's) three sons, Robert, Peter, and William, and to such of his
daughters that were at that time unmarried.
286 Elizabeth Poythress m. John Gilliam.]
[16. Robert Poythress (John Poythress2, Mary ______1) was born 1690 in
~Virginia [(P_1) BH], and died ABT 1747 in ~ Virginia, will in 1743. He
married Elizabeth ______. She was born in [(P_1) BH (W)].
Children of Robert Poythress and Elizabeth ______ are:
+ 50 i. Peter Poythress was born 1715 in VA of "Branchester" [(P_1) BHA]
[142 CAB], and died 1785 in ~Virginia.
51 ii. Robert Poythress was born BET 1715 AND 1747 in [(P_1) BHB], and died
JAN 1782 in Possible Date, no source.
52 iii. William Poythress was born BEF 1745 in [(P_1) BHC].
+ 53 iv. Jane Poythress was born BET 1715 AND 1747 in VA [(P_1) BHD] [some
doubt about children].
+ 54 v. Tabitha Poythress was born BET 1715 AND 1747 in VA, and died 1805.
55 vi. Elizabeth Poythress was born BET 1715 AND 1747 in ~Virginia. She
married John Gilliam AFT 1748. He was born 1712 in England [came with
brothers], and died 1772 in "Puddledock", Prince George County, Virginia.]

Family
Robert Poythress was born in 1690, in Charles City County, the son of John
Poythress and Christian Peebles. He married Elizabeth (Cocke?) prior to
1720, possibly the daughter of James Cocke and Elizabeth Pleasants. Their
children were (1) Elizabeth (c. 1720-c. 1788), who married John Gilliam; (2)
Robert (c. 1722-1/1782); (3) Agnes (c. 1723-), who married (1) (Samuel)
Harwood and (2) Benjamin Cocke, the son of Thomas Cocke and Katherine Holt;
(4) Peter (4/2/1724-12/19/1787), who married Elizabeth Bland, the daughter
of Richard Bland and Anne Poythress; (5) Mary Ann (c.1725-), who married
(John) Minge; (6) Tabitha (c. 1726-9/17/1805), who married Henry Randolph,
the son of Henry Randolph and Elizabeth Epes; (7) William (c. 1728-1783),
who married Elizabeth Penniston; (8) Jane (c. 1732-1805), who married John
Baird; and, (9) Susanna (c. 1734-), who married William Hall, the son of
Robert Hall and Martha Pleasants. Robert died before September 13, 1743.

Daughter, Tabitha Poythress
In Chesterfield County, the Will of Henry Randolph, deceased, June 17, 1769.
Give to my son, John Randolph, 1,000 acres called "Plantation" on which
testator lived.
Give to William Randolph, land called Rich Neck.
Give to my sons, Peter Randolph and Thomas Randolph, all of his lands, in
Amelia County, equally.
Give to my son, Robert Randolph, £500.
Give to my son Richard Randolph £500.
Give to all my children my personal property and slaves equally. Direct that
my unmarried children shall be maintained out of the profits of the estate.
Executrix, my wife. Executors, Major Peter Poythress, John Gilliam, Sr.,
John Gilliam, Jr.
The witnesses were Henry Featherstone, William Dyson and John Ratcliffe.
Tabitha Poythress Randolph (1725-1805), the daughter of Robert and Elizabeth
Poythress, married Henry Randolph (1720/1-1771), the son of Henry Randolph
and Elizabeth Epes. Major Peter Poythress (1733-1787), was the son of Robert
Poythress, and brother of Tabitha Poythress Randolph.
On September 7, 1773, in Chesterfield County, John Randolph, Gentleman, and
Mrs. Tabitha Randolph, widow of Henry Randolph, deceased, of Chesterfield
County, deed to Thomas Cogbill, of the same County, 161 acres, adjoining
said Randolph's and said Cogbill.
In 1775, in Chesterfield County, allotment of dower to Tabitha Randolph,
widow and relict of Henry Randolph, deceased, 400 acres of land, 8 negroes,
a horse and mare, 6 head of cattle, 28 hogs, all in Amelia County; 6
negroes, 2 beds with furniture, 10 silver teaspoons, all in Chesterfield
County.
On May 31, 1775, in Chesterfield County, Tabitha Randolph, of Chesterfield
County, widow and relict of Henry Randolph, late of said County, deceased,
deed to John Randolph, eldest son of the said Henry Randolph, deceased, 100
acres, being her dower.

Daughter, Agnes Poythress
December, 1745, in the Charles City County court, the Will of Samuel
Harwood, Gentleman, deceased, was presented by Agnes Harwood, one of the
executors, and proved by Peter Fontain, Robert Poythress and Mary Ann Minge.

Inheritance
On December 11, 1712, the Will of Robert's father, John Poythress, Sr., of
Prince George County, was proved by John Winningham, Peter Leeth and William
Stainback. John Poythress, Sr., had appointed his half-brothers, Thomas
Wynne and Joshua Wynne, and his friend, William Stainback, to divide his
estate. He appointed Robert's mother, Christian, and Robert's oldest
brother, John Poythress, to be executors of his Will. He gave his son,
Robert, 300 acres of land at the Indian Swamp, 50 acres of land on the lower
side of the Indian Swamp, two negroes, Tom and young Sarah, and an equal
share of his moveable estate.

Professional Life
In 1713, Robert Poythress was accused of furnishing ammunition to the
Indians.

Civic Activities
On January 6, 1715, in Prince George County, in the action of trespassing,
Arthur Biggins versus William Short, Robert Poythress and Edward Epes were
jurymen.
June 14, 1720, in Prince George County, John Poythress, Robert Poythress and
John Woodlief were sworn vestrymen of Westover parish.
On January 11, 1721, Joshua Poythress, 400 pounds tobacco for killing four
wolves; John Gilliam, Sr., 200 pounds tobacco for killing two wolves; Robert
Poythress, John Poythress, John Gilliam, Jr., and Richard Pace, 100 pounds
each for killing one wolf respectively.
On May 30, 1731, in Bristol parish, returns of the processioning for the
year 1731. John Fitzgerald and Robert Poythress none attending but John
Butler.
On April 8, 1738, and in March, 1739, Robert Poythress was named foreman of
a Grand Jury.
On May 9, 1738, in the Prince George County court, William Poythress,
gentleman, pursuant to the directions of the Act of Assembly concerning
Juries, empaneled and swore a Grand Jury composed of William Batte, Joshua
Poythress, Robert Poythress, Edward Wyatts, Joseph Thomas, John Holloway,
Charles Anderson, William Cureton, John Jones, William Bonner, William
Martin, Drury Oliver, Daniel Jackson, Peter Leath, Richard Simpson, John
Womack, Thomas Farreld, James Baugh, Bernard Lyke and John Livesay who
having received their charge, were sent out, and soon after returned into
court, and made their report as follows, viz: We find Ward's Creek Bridge to
be out of repair. William Batte, foreman.
On August 15, 1739, in the Prince George County court, in the action of
trespass for Assault and Battery brought by Robert Hudson against James
Moody for £10 current money damages by means of the defendant beating,
wounding and evilly treating the plaintiff at the parish of Bristol in this
county on January 9, 1738, and other enormities to the said plaintiff with
force and arms; then and there doing against the peace; as in the
declaration set forth. The defendant by his attorney appeared and by his
attorney pleaded not guilty and for trial put himself upon the county and
the plaintiff in like manner, whereupon a jury was empaneled and labored to
try the matter in issue, by name Richard Taylor, Joshua Poythress, Robert
Poythress, Thomas Poythress, Charles Poythress, John Sturdivant, Joseph
Simmons, A. Graham Toney, Joshua Wynne, William Parsons, Timothy Lamar, and
William Batte who, having heard the evidence and allegations of the
attorneys, received their charge, were sent out, and soon afterward returned
into court and brought in their verdict "We find for the plaintiff forty
shillings current money" which verdict makes motion of the plaintiff's
attorney recorded and it is considered by the court that the plaintiff
recover against the defendant the aforesaid sum of forty shillings being his
damages by the jurors aforesaid in names aforesaid assessed together with
costs and an attorney's fee Als: Exeo.
On August 15, 1739, in the Prince George County court, in the case of John
Cox versus Henry Fitz for debt, a jury was empaneled as follows: Robert
Poythress, John Poythress, Charles Poythress, among others, who found for
the plaintiff. On November 13, 1739, it was ordered that the following be
summoned to court to answer the presentments of the grand jury: Katherine
Harrison, Robert Poythress, John Avery, John Brown and William Stuard. In
December, 1739, presentments of the grand jury, names jurors, for
miscellaneous offenses, among which was: It was ordered that Robert
Poythress be summoned to appear at the next Court to answer the presentments
of the Grand Jury. On February 12, 1740, in the Prince George County court,
Robert Poythress having been presented by the last grand jury, December,
1739, for not keeping the road in repair of which he was overseer and being
summoned and called, appeared in court and made his excuses and was
acquitted.

Court Cases
On June 11, 1716, in the Prince George County court, in the action pending
between Edward Burball and Robert Poythress, neither party appearing was
dismissed.
In 1716, in the Prince George County court, James Thweatt, assignee of David
Duke, complained that Hubbard Gibson was indebted to him as assignee for 16
well dressed doe skins, by bill dated July 11, 1711, and that he had
unlawfully departed this county. Hubbard's estate was therefore attached for
one iron pot and a pair of andirons. Gibson did not appear and the judgement
was confirmed. The goods were to be appraised by Robert Poythress, William
Batte, George Rives and Edward Mitchell, and they were to report to the next
court. On April 9, 1717, the Sheriff returned the account of Hubbard Gibson,
attached for James Thweatt, 1 iron pott at £1/19/4, that was appraised by
William Batte, Robert Poythress and Edward Mitchell.
On August 13, 1717, in the Prince George court, in the petition for an acre
of land opposite his acre on Baley's Run, to build a mill, on land of the
heirs of Joseph Holycross, deceased, Martha Holycross, mother of the said
heirs, gave permission. It was ordered that Robert Poythress and Edward
Mitchell lay out an acre. John Peterson was to pay for the land.
On April 14, 1719, Henry Batte made oath that Thomas Harwell, deceased, died
intestate, and was granted administration of his estate. John Poythress,
Robert Poythress, John Fitzgerald and Edward Mitchell were to take
inventory. On the same date, Joshua Poythress, Robert Poythress, John
Fitzgerald and Edward Mitchell were nominated and appointed to appraise the
estate of Thomas Harwell, deceased, and make report of their proceedings
therein to the next court when Henry Batte, the administrator, thereof was
ordered to return the inventory.
On May 12, 1719, Robert Poythress and Edward Mitchell, who were appointed to
lay and value one acre of land lying on the Balys River, and belonging to
the land of Joseph Holycross, deceased, for John Peterson's convenience to
build a water Mill and to make a report of their proceedings which was
ordered to be recorded and was accordingly truly recorded as follows; viz:
[copy blotted] Prince George County.
In March, 1738, in the Prince George County court, in the action of accounts
brought by Robert Poythress against Francis Haddon for £20 damage of the
same because of the defendant denying to account for sundry goods and
merchandise, viz., 398 gallons of rum, 478 pounds of Muscovado(?) sugar and
50 gallons of malt also belonging to the said Robert Poythress and by him
delivered to the said Francis who was his bailiff and receiver from the 15th
day of April, 1734 till February 1736, to merchandise and profit with at the
parish of Bristol in this county for the use benefit and advantage of the
said Robert as in his declaration is not for this the defendant by his
attorney having pleaded that he never was the Bailiff or Receiver of the
plaintiff's and the plaintiff joining in the issue at the last court a jury
was empaneled and sworn to try the same, who having heard the evidence, and
received their charge, were sent out and soon after returned into court, and
brought in their verdict that they found that the defendant was Bailiff and
Receiver which verdict was then recorded and after special Bail given by the
defendant, William Stark, Frances Eppes, and George Gordon or any two of
them were appointed to hear and take the accounts of the said parties and
were ordered to make report of their proceedings therein to this court
pursuant therein to the said William Stark, Francis Eppes and George Gordon
made their report, which on the motion of the plaintiff's attorney was
recorded, as follows pursuant to an Order of the Court: We the Sub-jurors
make in order to state and settle the amounts between Robert Poythress and
Francis Haddon at which time the said Poythress and Haddon appeared before
us, but the said Haddon refused to produce any amount March 6, 1737. William
Stark, Francis Eppes and George Gordon therefore on the motion of the court
that the plaintiff recover against the defendant £20 being the damages in
the Declaration mentioned by means of the defendants refusing to account as
aforesaid together with Costs and Attorney's Fee, Als: Exeo.
In June, 1738, in the Prince George County court, on the Fieri Facias
awarded Robert Poythress on his judgement obtained against William Poythress
and Francis Poythress, executors, of the last Will and Testament of John
Fitzgerald, deceased, Miles Thweatt, one of the under-Sheriffs, of this
court made the above return which was recorded.
In July, 1738, in the Prince George County court, by virtue of this writ to
me directed, I have taken the within named Francis Haddon, whose body before
the Justice within named, and places within contained, I have ready to
satisfy Robert Poythress if the debts and damage within mentioned as writing
to me is commanded of ______. Jos. Simmons, Sub-Sheriff. On the Capias ad
Satisfaciendum awarded Robert Poythress, on his Judgement obtained against
Francis Haddon, Joseph Simmons, one of the under Sheriffs of this County,
made the above returns, which was recorded. On September 13, 1738, in the
suits by petitions brought by Francis Haddon against Robert Poythress for 4
pounds, 14 shillings, 3 pence current money the defendant appeared and
pleaded nils debit and the plaintiff joining in the issue, it was submitted
to the Court for Trial and the Court having heard the arguments and
allegations of the said parties and equated and sorted their accounts gives
judgement for the plaintiff for 22 shillings and 11 pence and on the motion
of the plaintiff's attorney it is considered by the court that the plaintiff
recover against the defendant the aforesaid sum of 22 shillings and 11 pence
and the costs Als: Exeo.
On February 11, 1739, in the Prince George County court, the suits by
petition by William Steward against Robert Poythress, neither party
appearing was dismissed.

Property: Personal Property and Land
On June 14, 1720, in Prince George County, on the motion of Robert
Poythress, he was exempted from paying levy for his negro woman, Sue.
On May 9, 1717, Stith Bolling, of Southwark parish, in Surry County, sold to
Robert Poythress, of Westover parish, in Prince George County, 500 acres, in
Prince George County, on Southwardly Run, formerly belonging to Captain
Henry Batte, deceased. The witnesses were Peter Poythress, Peter Wynne and
Richard Raines.
On September 12, 1721, a land exchange between William Parham, of Surry
County, to Robert Poythress, of Prince George County, 267 acres of land and
£5 paid by Robert Poythress in exchange for 100 acres of land in Martin's
Brandon parish, in Prince George County, bounded by William Bette, Thomas
Bolling, John Young and William Parham. The witnesses were Peter Wynne and
William Jones.
On September 28, 1728, Robert Poythress, of Prince George County, was
granted 291 acres of new land, on the lower side of Butterwood Swamp, in
Prince George County, on the side of Beaver Pond Swamp, adjoining Peter
Wynne. This land was willed to his son, Robert Poythress, in his 1743 will.
On September 28, 1728, Robert Glover, of Prince George County, was granted
297 acres of new land, on the lower side of Butterwood Swamp, in Prince
George County, upon the brook at the upper end of the old beaver ponds above
Robert Poythress. This land was willed to his son, Peter Poythress, in his
1743 will.
On March 22, 1733, a deed of lease on 267 acres, Robert Poythress, of Prince
George County, to John Parrum, of Surry County, land on the south side of
the main Blackwater River, in Surry County, on the southwest side of the
Indian Swamp, by the side of Beaver Pond Swamp. The witnesses were Sloman
Wynne, David Poythress and William Parrum. This land was bought by John
Poythress (1674-aft. 1724), son of John Poythress, on September 15, 1717.
On June 18, 1735, Thomas Bolling, Mariner, sold to Robert Poythress, of
Prince George County, 412 acres, on the north side of the Nottaway River, in
Surry County, upon the Gally Swamp, to Mockerson Neck Creek. The witnesses
were John Mason and Thomas Edmunds. Robert Poythress left this land to his
son, William Poythress, in his 1743 will.
On July 13, 1735, David Poythress, of Surry County, 600 acres, sold to
Robert Poythress, in Surry County, 350 acres having been devised to David
Poythress, December 11, 1712, by his Father, John Poythress, deceased, by
his last Will and testament, the other 250 acres were surveyed and patented
by David Poythress on September 5, 1723. The land was on the north side of
the Nottaway River, in Surry County, adjoining John Roberts, the Pole branch
and the Indian Swamp. The witnesses were Thomas Edmunds and David Wallace.
Robert Poythress left this land to his son, Peter Poythress, in his 1743
will. The 350 acres were originally granted to John Poythress, David's and
Robert's father, on October 24, 1701.
On June 1, 1741, Robert Poythress, Gentleman, was granted 400 acres, in
Amelia County, on the north side of the Nottaway River, adjoining Hezekiah
Powell. Robert Poythress left this property to his son, William Poythress,
in his 1743 will. This land was in Prince George County prior to 1734.

Adjoining Property
On August 20, 1745, William Stone, 700 acres, in Amelia County, on the north
side of the Hurricane Swamp, adjoining Henry Green, Powell, Poythress and
Wyatt.
On August 20, 1747, Mary Hawkins and Francis Wyatt, 200 acres, in Amelia
County, on the north side of Hurricane Swamp, down a fork of the Great
Branch, adjoining Poythress.

As Witness
On July 6, 1715, William Raines, of Prince George County, to his son, Thomas
Rains, of the same County, 76 acres, in Prince George County, on the north
side of Jones Hole swamp. The witnesses were Robert Poythress, William
Stainback and Frank Epes.
On September 12, 1721, Adam Ivy, of Martin's Brandon parish, in Prince
George County, sold to Peter Poythress, of the same parish and county, 40
acres along Peter Poythress' property, in Martin's Brandon, in Prince George
County. The witnesses were Peter Wynne and Robert Poythress.
On August 14, 1739, a deed of land from Ann Stratton to William Batte was
proved by the oaths of Robert Poythress, John Peterson and Thomas Batte,
witnesses.

Family Estates
In Prince George County, the Will of John Poythress, of Martin's Brandon
parish, in Prince George County, proved May 12, 1724, and recorded August
11, 1724, at Merchant's Hope court, with an account of his personal property
items valued at 209/14/5.
I appoint Robert Poythress and John Woodlief, pastor, my executors of this
my last Will and testament. The witnesses were Francis Epes, Jr., William
Stainback and John Winningham.
At a court held at Merchant's Hope for Prince George County, on Tuesday, May
12, 1724, the last Will and testament of John Poythress, deceased, was
exhibited into court by Robert Poythress and John Woodlief, his executors,
who made oath thereto, and it was proved by the oaths of Francis Epes,
William Stainback and John Winningham. And on the motion of the said Robert
Poythress and John Woodlief, executors, and their giving Bond and Security
according to law, Certificate was granted them for obtaining a probate of
the said Will in due form. John Stainback, John Winningham and William
Stainback were the appraisers. On December 13, 1726, in the Prince George
County court, the inventory of the estate of Captain John Poythress,
deceased, was valued at 130/12/8. The executors were Robert Poythress and
John Woodlief. The legatees were John Poythress' wife, Mary, his daughter,
Rebecca, his daughter, Elizabeth, Colonel William Randolph, Captain Richard
Randolph and John Fitzgerald, among others.

October 4, 1727, in the Prince George County court, the Certificate of
probate for the Will of Henry Batte; named his mother, Mary Batte, and his
sister, Mary Poythress. The witness was Robert Poythress.

In Prince George County, the Will of Joshua Poythress, of Martin's Brandon
Parish, in Prince George County, dated January 17, 1740, and probated April
8, 1741.
The land I live on, bought from Mrs. Elizabeth Duke and Captain John
Hardyman, to my sons, Joshua and William, to be equally divided. All of my
land on the Nottaway River, in Surry County, likewise to be equally divided.
To my granddaughter, Harwood, £50.
To my son, Littlebury, 20 shillings, and my other sons are to keep him
during his lifetime.
All of the rest of my estate to be equally divided between my wife and my
five children: Joshua, William, Ann Poythress, Elizabeth Poythress and Mary
Poythress.
My brothers, William and Robert Poythress, and my friends and relations,
Richard Bland, Thomas Poythress, and John Woodlief are to divide the estate.
The executors to be my brother, Robert Poythress, and my cousin, Thomas
Poythress. The witnesses were Ann Bland, Christian Poythress, and Richard
Bland.
April 8, 1741, in the Prince George County court, the last Will and
testament of Joshua Poythress, deceased, was exhibited into court by Robert
Poythress and Thomas Poythress, his executors, who made oath thereto and it
being proved by the oath of Richard Bland, Gentleman, and, Ann Bland, two of
the witnesses thereto who also made oath that they saw Christian Poythress
subscribe the said Will, a witness was ordered to be recorded and on the
motion of the said Robert Poythress and their giving Bond and Security
according to law, certificate was granted them for obtaining a probate of
the said Will in due form. Robert Poythress and Thomas Poythress, executors,
of the last Will and testament of Joshua Poythress, deceased, with Richard
Bland and William Poythress, Gentlemen, their Securities entered into Bond
in the sum of £5,000 current money payable to Robert Bolling with condition
for their faithful executorship and thereby acknowledge the same in court.
It was ordered that Robert Poythress and Thomas Poythress, executors, of the
last Will and testament of Joshua Poythress, deceased, present the said deed
and its estate to the next court. Richard Bland (1710-1776) was married to
Anne Poythress (1712-1758). Anne Poythress was the first cousin of Thomas
Poythress and the niece of Joshua and Robert Poythress. William Poythress
was the brother of Robert and Joshua Poythress, and the uncle of Thomas
Poythress.

Robert Poythress' Will
The Will of Robert Poythress, of Martin's Brandon parish, in Prince George
County, dated May 24, 1743. The original Will was located in the
Chesterfield County Dead Papers.
I give my son, Robert Poythress, and his heirs, all my lands on which I now
live containing 1,100 acres and also 291 acres adjoining the Butterwood
Swamp.
I give my son, Peter Poythress, and his heirs, my lands containing about 600
acres lying on the Nottoway River and known by the name of Tanotoro and 297
acres lying on Butterwood, which I bought from James Glover.
I give my son, William Poythress, and his heirs, all my lands lying between
Monkoes Neck and Nottoway which I bought of Captain Thomas Bolling and all
my lands in Amelia County contiguous to William Stone's land.
I give my wife the use of 12 negroes, Harry, Hunt, Tom, Jamey, George,
Nilsy, Sarah, Lucy, Nick, Hannah, Matt, Nan, Penelope and the use of 1/3 of
my lands during her life or widowhood and 1/4 of my house furniture and
stocks to be divided between my wife and my 3 sons and any of my daughters
that are unmarried at the time of her mother's death and their heirs
respectively.
The division is to be made by my brother, William Poythress, Colonel Richard
Bland, and Mr. John Gilliam or the survivors.
I give my son, Robert, and his heirs, 9 negroes, Tom boy, Mingo, Charles,
Judy, Bett, Jenny, Sarah, George, and Boatswin.
I give my son, Peter, and his heirs, 9 negroes, Prince, Sterling, Cimon,
Jack, Sarah, Bett, Agnes, Aneky, and Harry.
I give my son, William, and his heirs, 9 negroes, Phillis, Seanah, Gambia,
Caesar, Pheby, Kate, Pat, and Pompey.
If either of my sons dies before he comes of age, the whole estate, real and
personal, is to be divided equally between the surviving sons or their
heirs.
I confirm to my daughter, Elizabeth Gilliam all the negroes already given to
her.
I give my grandson, Robert Gilliam, a negro boy, Johnny, and a girl about
the same age.
I give my daughter, Mary Anna Minge, negroes, Abbah, Sawney, Jenny to her
and her heirs and thirty pounds current money to be laid out in negroes.
I give my daughter, Agnes Harwood, 98 pounds, 10 shillings current money
which her husband has already received.
I give my granddaughter, Tabitha Harwood, one negro girl, Amy, now in the
use of her father.
I give my daughter, Tabitha Poythress, 130 pounds current money and negro
girl, Sue.
I give my daughter, Susanna Poythress, and her heirs, 5 negroes, Pheby,
Jack, Hannibal, Nan, and Tom.
I give my daughter, Jane Poythress, and her heirs, 5 negroes, Phillis, Nan,
Titus, Scot, and Phillis.
All the remainder of my estate I give and devise to be equally divided
between my wife and 3 sons.
I appoint my wife and sons, Robert and Peter, to be my executors. Robert
Poythress. The witnesses were Richard Bland, William Batte and William
Poythress. The Will was recorded at a court held at Fitzgerald's for Prince
George County, September 13, 1743. The widow and executrix, Elizabeth
Poythress, exhibited the Will, with Robert Poythress, and qualified as
executors. All witnesses proved the Will.
Robert Poythress received 350 acres at the Indian swamp from his father,
John Poythress, in his December 11, 1712, Will. On May 9, 1717, Robert
Poythress bought 500 acres, in Prince George County, from Stith Bolling. On
September 12, 1721, Robert exchanged 267 acres with William Parham for 100
acres in Martin's Brandon, Prince George County. On March 22, 1732, Robert
leased 267 acres at the Indian swamp to John Parham. On September 28, 1728,
Robert bought 291 acres at the Butterwood swamp, in Prince George County,
which he left to his son, Robert Poythress, in his 1743 Will. On July 12,
1735, Robert bought 600 acres from his brother, David Poythress, part of
which, Tanotoro, was left by John Poythress to his son, David Poythress, in
his 1712 Will. Robert left this land to his son, Peter Poythress, in his
1743 Will. On September 28, 1728, Robert had land adjacent to the 297 acres
bought by Robert Glover, in Prince George County. He left this property to
his son, Peter Poythress, in his 1743 Will. On June 17, 1735, Robert bought
412 acres, in Surry County, from Thomas Bolling, Mariner, which he left to
his son, William Poythress, in his 1743 Will. On June 1, 1741, Robert bought
400 acres, in Amelia county, that he left to his son, William, in his 1743
Will.
In June, 1794, in Chesterfield County, Tabitha Randolph, of Chesterfield
County, daughter of Robert Poythress, late of Prince George County,
deceased, a deed to Henry Archer [son-in-law], of Chesterfield County, for
£100, 1/5th interest in 8 negroes and their increase devised by her father,
Robert Poythress, of Prince George County, in his Will dated May 24, 1743,
in which Will said Robert Poythress provided that his wife should have a
life interest in the said negroes and their increase should be equally
divided between the three sons of the said Robert Poythress, viz. Robert,
Peter and William Poythress, and such of the testators daughters as were
married at the time of their mother's death. The said Tabitha being married
at the time of her mother's death conveys this interest. In 1794, in
Chesterfield County, Tabitha Randolph, one of the daughters and legatees of
Robert Poythress, deceased, versus William Mayo, acting executor of Peter
Poythress, deceased. The court ordered the commissioners to set aside to
said plaintiff certain negroes out of the estate of Robert Poythress,
deceased, with the increase since his death, and also estimate hire from the
death of said Peter Poythress, and make report to this court. Summary Bill
of Complaint. Elizabeth Poythress possessed herself of 12 slaves according
to the will of Robert Poythress. She died many years after her husband,
surviving her sons, Robert and William. The slaves then devolved to their
brother, Peter. Until her death, Elizabeth Poythress lived with or near said
Peter and he had management of her affairs. He was entitled to 3/5 of the
slaves at her death in behalf of himself and his two deceased brothers,
William and Robert. At that time, only 2 of the testator's daughters were
unmarried, the oratrix, Tabitha Randolph, and her sister, Elizabeth Gilliam.
Peter continued to keep under his care the 8 negroes of which he was 3/5
owner. He died a few years past. William Mayo, Esquire, was the acting
executor of the said Peter Poythress and continued to hold possession of the
said 8 slaves, though often requested to give the oratrix her share. She
desired an accounting of the 8 slaves and their issue and sex be given, then
her 1/5 of said slaves and 1/5 of labor since the death of said Peter
Poythress to be allotted to her.

Activities of the Widow
On October 16, 1747, in the Bristol parish Vestry Book, payment was ordered
to the executors of Robert Poythress. On November 10, 1748, at a Vestry held
at the Brick Church for Bristol parish, present, among others, Colonel
William Poythress. It was ordered, to Colonel William Poythress repairing
the Glebe, £2/10/0; to cash paid to Robert Poythress, executors, £22/14/2;
to Colonel Poythress, £0/12/0.
On August 15, 1748, in the Amelia County court, Road Order. It was ordered
that William Stone be appointed Surveyor of the Road from the County line
into James Jackson's and that Robert Taylor, Lewis Hammond, William Manire,
Mrs. Elizabeth Poythress, George Hill, Henry Clark, Robert Stadley, John
Bentley and all their male laboring tithables assist him in doing so.
On May 16, 1749, in the Surry County court, upon the attachment obtained by
Peter Poythress and Elizabeth Poythress, executors &c. of Robert Poythress,
deceased, and Joshua Poythress, executor of Thomas Poythress, deceased,
against the estate of Thomas Sessom who has privately removed himself or so
absconded that the ordinary process of law cannot be served on him for a
debt of £62/1/4 Current Money due to the plaintiff from the said defendants.
This day came the plaintiff by their attorney and the Sheriff having made
return that he had executed the said Writ in the hands of Richard Hill and
had summoned him to appear whereupon he the aforesaid Hill being solemnly
called but made default and it appearing to the court that there is due to
the plaintiff £10/11/8½ from the said defendant. Therefore it was that the
plaintiff recover the aforesaid sum of £10/11/8½ against the said Richard
Hill together with interest for the same after the rate of five Centum per
annum to be computed from May 4, 1749, to the time of payment and their
costs by them expended and the said defendant in mercy &c. Joshua Poythress,
son of Joshua Poythress, and first cousin of Thomas Poythress, was the
executor of Thomas Poythress' (1683-1749) Will. Peter Poythress and his
mother, Elizabeth, were the executors of Robert Poythress' Will. Peter
Poythress was a son of Robert Poythress.
On May 15, 1750, in the Surry County court, attachment was obtained by Peter
and Elizabeth Poythress, executors of Robert Poythress, deceased, and Joshua
Poythress, executor of Thomas Poythress, deceased, against the estate of
Thomas Sisson.
In May, 1751, in the Surry County court, Joshua Poythress, assignee of
Robert and Thomas Poythress, who were assignees of Thomas Eldridge,
Gentleman, plaintiffs against Francis Hutchings, defendant in debt. The
defendant being arrested and now called and not appearing it was therefore
considered that the plaintiff recover against the said defendant and William
Longbottom his Security for his appearance the debt in the declaration
mentioned amounting to £___ and his costs by him in this behalf expended
unless the defendant shall appear at the next court and plead.
On June 7, 1751, in the Chesterfield County court, Elizabeth Poythress,
plaintiff, against Henry Reveland, defendant, on a petition the defendant
being no inhabitant, suit abates.
In July, 1751, in the Surry County court, Elizabeth and Peter Poythress,
executors of Robert Poythress, deceased, plaintiffs against Judith Eldridge,
executrix of Thomas Eldridge, deceased, defendant on a Scire facias to have
execution of a decree of this court obtained by the plaintiff's testator in
his lifetime against the said defendant the 21st day of July 1742. The
defendant appeared by her counsel and prayed and has leave until the next
court to answer. In the same month, Joshua Poythress, assignee of Robert and
Thomas Poythress, who were assignees of Thomas Eldridge, plaintiff, against
Francis Hutchings, defendant in debt. Discontinued and by consent of the
defendant it was ordered that he pay unto the plaintiff his costs. Tobacco
costs 107 pounds.
On August 9, 1751, in the Henrico County records, Will Book 1, the Will of
Elizabeth Cocke, probated on the first Monday in July, 1752, mentioned her
daughter, Elizabeth Portriss, her grandson, William Fleming Cocke,
granddaughters, Rebecca, Ann and Tabitha Cocke, and her son, James Cocke,
who was named executor. Elizabeth Cocke Poythress was wife of Robert
Poythress (1690-1743).
In May , 1755, in the Sussex County court, Elizabeth and Peter Poythress,
executors, &c, of Robert Poythress, deceased, who was assignee of Judith
Eldridge, executrix of Thomas Eldridge, deceased, plaintiffs versus Henry
Meachum, executor, &c, of Edward Mecham, deceased, defendant, presentment
for adultery. The case was continued. In February, 1756, Elizabeth and Peter
Poythress, executors of Robert Poythress, deceased, who was assignee of
Judith Eldridge, executrix of Thomas Eldridge, deceased. plaintiffs against
Henry Meachum, executor of Edward Meacham, deceased, defendant by petition
for 38 shillings said to be due by Note of hand. This day came the parties
by their attorneys who being heard of and upon the premises and mature
deliberation thereupon had and the plaintiff producing the said Note for the
aforesaid sum of thirty eight shillings therefore it was considered that the
plaintiffs recover the same against the said defendant and his costs by him
in this behalf hands of the said Henry if so much thereof he hath in his
hands unadministered, if not, the cost was to be levied of his own proper
goods and chattles. Present was Thomas Vines, Gentleman.

Will of the Widow
April 12, 1787, in Prince George County, the Will of Elizabeth Poythress, of
Prince George County, the widow of Peter Poythress (deceased as well). In
consideration of natural affection for daughter, Sally Lee, and "to prevent
any dispute which may happen in the construction of my husband's Will
respecting the devise in the said Will of Kate's daughter, "Fanny," to my
said daughter, Sally Lee" "which was in said Will devised to me," I give my
said daughter, Sally Lee, the said negro, Fanny, and her children, Becky,
Betty and Kate and their increase" "my hand and seal the ___ day of ____,
1787. Signed by Elizabeth Poythress. The witnesses were John Batte, Tabitha
Randolph and William Bingham. On April 14, 1787, at a court held this date,
for Prince George County, this foregoing deed from Elizabeth Poythress to
her daughter, Sally Lee, was proved by the oaths of John Batte and William
Bingham. Sally Bland Poythress Lee (1768-1828) was the daughter of Peter
Poythress and Elizabeth Bland. Sally married Squire Richard Lee (1727-1795).
Tabitha Poythress Randolph (1725-1805), Peter Poythress' sister, was one of
the witnesses. John Batte (1757-1816), a son-in-law of Peter Poythress, was
married to Mary Poythress (1762-1815), and was also a witness.
June, 1793, in Chesterfield County, deed of Tabitha (Poythress) Randolph, of
Chesterfield County, daughter of Robert Poythress, late of Prince George
County, deceased, a deed to Henry Archer of Chesterfield County, L100. 1/5
interest in 8 negroes and their increase devised by her father, Robert
Poythress, of Prince George County, in his Will dated May 24, 1743, in which
the said Robert Poythress provided that his wife should have a life interest
in the said negroes and their increase and that at her death the said
negroes and their increase should be equally divided between the three sons
of the said Robert Poythress, viz. Robert, Peter, and William Poythress, and
such of the testators daughters as were married at the time of their mother's
death. The said Tabitha being married at the time of her mother's death
conveys this interest. In 1794, in Chesterfield County, Tabitha Randolph,
one of the daughters and legatees of Robert Poythress, deceased, versus
William Mayo, acting executor of Peter Poythress, deceased. The court
ordered the commissioners to set aside to said plaintiff certain negroes out
of the estate of Robert Poythress, deceased, with the increase since his
death, and also estimate hire from the death of said Peter Poythress, and
make report to this court.
In June, 1794, in Chesterfield County, Tabitha Randolph, of Chesterfield
County, daughter of Robert Poythress, late of Prince George County,
deceased, a deed to Henry Archer [son-in-law], of Chesterfield County, £100.
1/5 interest in 8 negroes and their increase devised by her father, Robert
Poythress, of Prince George County, in his Will dated May 24, 1743, in which
Will said Robert Poythress provided that his wife should have a life
interest in the said negroes and their increase should be equally divided
between the three sons of the said Robert Poythress, viz. Robert, Peter and
William Poythress, and such of the testators daughters as were married at
the time of their mother's death. The said Tabitha being married at the time
of her mother's death conveys this interest.

Summary Bill of Complaint. Elizabeth Poythress possessed herself of 12
slaves according to the will of Robert Poythress. She died many years after
her husband, surviving her sons, Robert and William. The slaves then
devolved to their brother, Peter. Until her death, Elizabeth Poythress lived
with or near said Peter and he had management of her affairs. He was
entitled to 3/5 of the slaves at her death in behalf of himself and his two
deceased brothers, William and Robert. At that time, only 2 of the testator's
daughters were unmarried, your oratrix, Tabitha Randolph, and her sister,
Elizabeth Gilliam. Peter continued to keep under his care the 8 negroes of
which he was 3/5 owner. He died a few years past. William Mayo, Esquire, is
the acting executor of said Peter Poythress and continues to hold possession
of the said 8 slaves, though often requested to give your oratrix her share.
She desires an accounting of the 8 slaves and their issue and sex be given,
then her 1/5 of said slaves and 1/5 of labor since the death of said Peter
Poythress to be allotted to her.



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