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Archiver > POYTHRESS > 2005-12 > 1134750005


From: "Michael Tutor" <>
Subject: Colonel Wm. Poythress, of Bristol parish, Prince Geo. Co., Gentleman Justice, 3rd generation
Date: Fri, 16 Dec 2005 11:20:05 -0500


With the number of Francises, Johns and Williams, it is hard to distinguish
between some of the acts of the father and the son and between cousins of
the same name. With the first William, son of John Poythress, Sr., of Deep
Bottom, it is safe to identify him with all entries until the 1740s. Colonel
William Poythress was born in 1694 and died in 1763. His cousin, William (c.
1720-), son of John Poythress, Jr., first appeared in his father's Will when
he inherited 150 acres called "Powells," and was also to receive 400 acres
more at the discretion of the executors of the 1724 Will. Looking through
the list of Poythress' deeds, the only transactions involving a possible
reference to the 400 acres are the following:

Poythress, William, Gent. 3/24/1735 400 Prince George Co
Sanders, John 7/25/1746 400 Prince George Co William Poythress
Elder, William 9/25/1746 400 Prince George Co William Poythress

These three transactions may be those of Colonel William Poythress or one of
these may have had something to do with his younger cousin. His cousin,
William, son of John Poythress, Jr., requested a change of guardian in 1739
from Robert Simpson to Charles Irby.

Colonel William Poythress also had a nephew, William (aft. 1720-), son of
his brother Joshua. This William would have been of legal age in the 1740s
also. This William and his brother Joshua were to look out for their
brother, Littlebury, as requested by their father, Joshua Poythress (c.
1688-1740). Their father left his property that he bought from Mrs.
Elizabeth Duke and Captain John Hardiman to be equally divided between
Joshua and William. He also left his property on the Nottaway River in Surry
County to be divided between the two brothers.

Colonel William Poythress' oldest son was named William (c. 1728-c. 1769).
This son was about 34 years old when he became the executor of his father's
Will.

Finally, Colonel William had another nephew, William (c. 1737-1783), son of
his brother, Robert, who would have been of age in the Colonel's lifetime.
This William was evidently in the service of Virginia during the
revolutionary war as he has been used by Daughters of the American
Revolution. His father, Robert, left him land between Monkoes Neck and the
Nottaway River that had been bought by Robert from Captain Thomas Bolling
and also left William all of his land in Amelia County adjoining William
Stone.

The Third Generation: Colonel William Poythress, of Bristol parish, Prince
George Co., Gentleman Justice
R. Bolling Batte on William Poythress
[25 William Poythress (1694-1763), m. c. 1725 Sarah Epes 121 7 (1702-1750),
daughter of Francis and Anne (Isham) Epes of Henrico. William Poythress
served as a colonel in the militia, a vestryman of Bristol Parish, and a
sheriff of Prince George County. Upon the formation of Dinwiddie County, in
1752, his lands fell within that county. Sarah's tomb in Blandford
churchyard is perhaps the earliest in Virginia still in existence for either
the Epes or the Poythress families. William's is next to it. [The raised
tomb of William Poythress 25 is directly in front of the front door of
Blandford Church, about 20 feet away.]
251 Anne Isham Poythress (1726 - 1790), m. Thomas S. Gordon. Anne Isham
survived her husband and left a will naming nephews, nieces, and others.
253 Sarah Poythress (1731-), d. s. p.
254 Elizabeth Poythress (1741-), m. 1760 in Dinwiddie Patrick Ramsay, a
native of Glasgow, Scotland. Patrick Ramsay was a merchant in Petersburg
until shortly before the Revolution when he removed with his family to
Scotland. In 1791, Elizabeth (Poythress) Ramsay, then a widow, returned to
Virginia with her children and settled in Alexandria.]
[17. William Poythress (John Poythress2, Mary ______1) was born 1694 in
Charles City County, VA [(P_1) BE], and died 18 JAN 1763 in Dinwiddie
County, VA. He was buried in Blandford. He married Sarah Epes ABT 1725,
daughter of Francis Epes and Anne Isham. She was born 1702 in VA [(E_1) 121
7], and died 1750.
Children of William Poythress and Sarah Epes are:
56 i. Anne Isham Poythress was born 7 APR 1726 in Prince George Co., VA
[(P_1) BEA], and died ABT MAY 1790. She married Thomas S. Gordon. He was
born ABT 1726.
+ 57 ii. William Poythress was born 14 MAR 1727/28 in VA [(P_1) BEB], and
died ABT 1769.
58 iii. Sarah Poythress was born 1731 in VA [(P_1) BEC] unmarried.
+ 59 iv. Elizabeth Poythress was born 21 SEP 1741 in VA [(P_1) BED}, and
died in Alexandria, Virginia [But lived in Scotland during Revolution].]

Family
William Poythress was born in 1694, in Charles City County, Virginia, the
son of John Poythress and Christian Peebles. He married Sarah Epes, the
daughter of Francis Epes and Anne Isham, about 1725. (1) On April 9, 1726,
their first child, Anne Isham Poythress, was born in Bristol parish. She was
baptized on June 5, 1726. She married Thomas S. Gordon. (2) On March 14,
1727, their first son, William Poythress, was born in Bristol parish. He was
baptized on May 26, 1728. He married (1) Mary Epes and possibly, (2) Lucy
Edwards. (3) On August 7, 1731, their second daughter, Sarah Poythress, was
born in Bristol parish. She was baptized on October 7, 1731. (4) On
September 21, 1741, their third daughter, Elizabeth Poythress, was born in
Bristol parish. She was baptized on November 22, 1741. She married Patrick
Ramsey, the son of Andrew Ramsey and Janet Houston. William Poythress died
January 18, 1763, in Dinwiddie County, Virginia. His son, Captain William
Poythress, was the executor of his Will, which was recorded February, 1763,
in Dinwiddie County.

Daughter, Anne Isham Poythress
January 16, 1790, in Prince George County, the Will of Ann Isham Gordon.
To William Yates, the first son of the late Colonel William Yates, a negro
girl, Annika.
To Benjamin Poythress Yates, the second son of Colonel Yates, a negro boy,
Peter (Sally's brother).
To my niece, Mary Muir, my negro woman, Sally, and her child to youngest
daughter of said niece.
To William Poythress Muir, eldest son of my said niece, a negro boy, David,
etc.

Inheritance
On December 11, 1712, the Will of William's father, John Poythress, Sr., of
Prince George County, was proved by John Winningham, Peter Leeth and William
Stainback. John Poythress, Sr., had appointed his half-brothers, Thomas
Wynne and Joshua Wynne, and his friend, William Stainback, to divide his
estate. He appointed William's mother, Christian, and William's oldest
brother, John Poythress, to be executors of his Will. He named his two
brothers, Thomas and Joshua Wynne, and William Stainback to divide his
estate. He gave his son, William, three negroes, Frank Cook and Amy and
Frank Cook at nattuah, and an equal share of his moveable estate. The
witnesses of the Will were John Winningham, Peter Leeth, Thomas Leeth and
William Stainback.

Professional Life
On April 25, 1728, William Poythress was named by the Governor, Sheriff,
Prince George County.
On May 2, 1729, William Poythress was appointed Sheriff, for Prince George
County, for the ensuing year.
In 1729, he was Captain William Poythress.
On April 27, 1731, the Governor appointed Daniel Walker, William Poythress
and Peter Jones inspectors of tobacco at Appomattox, Munford's and Powell's
Creek.
On October 22, 1732, the Governor appointed William Poythress and Peter
Jones as inspectors of the tobacco at Appomattox.
In 1735, he was Major William Poythress.
In 1736, in Henrico County, Debits for Quit rents; Colonel William Kennon,
debtor for Quit rents; Peter Jones, for 500 acres; Major Poythress, for 689½
acres. To a last year's note to James Moore, Bolling Warehouse, paid by
Colonel Kennon.
On April 11, 1738, in Prince George County, at a court held at Fitzgerald's,
William Poythress, among others, was present as a Gentlemen Justice.
On May 9, 1738, in the Prince George County court, William Poythress,
gentleman, pursuant to the directions of the Act of Assembly concerning
Juries, empaneled and swore a Grand Jury composed of William Batte, Joshua
Poythress, Robert Poythress, Edward Wyatts, Joseph Thomas, John Holloway,
Charles Anderson, William Cureton, John Jones, William Bonner, William
Martin, Drury Oliver, Daniel Jackson, Peter Leath, Richard Simpson, John
Womack, Thomas Farreld, James Baugh, Bernard Lyke and John Livesay who
having received their charge, were sent out, and soon after returned into
court, and made their report as follows, viz: We find Ward's Creek Bridge to
be out of repair. William Batte was the foreman.
On October 10, 1738, in Prince George County, at a court held at Fitzgerald's,
present, William Poythress, among others, as Gentlemen Justices.
On November 27, 1738, in the Prince George County, at a court held at
Fitzgerald's, present, among others, were William Poythress and Francis
Poythress, Gentlemen Justices.
On March 13, 1739, in Prince George County, pursuant to the Direction of the
Acts of Assembly entitled an Act for the better regulation of the Militia:
Richard Bland, William Poythress, William Harrison, Peter Jones, Francis
Poythress, Isham Eppes, and Joshua Wynne were commissioned officers in the
Militia and took the oaths appointed by said acts and signed the Test.
In 1738, William Poythress, was a Justice of the Peace, in Prince George
County.
On August 14, 1739, in Prince George County, William Poythress and Peter
Jones were recommended as tobacco inspectors at Appomattox Point and at the
warehouse of John Bolling, Gentleman, in Henrico County, opposite the
aforesaid warehouse.
On November 14, 1739, in Prince George County, William Poythress was named
as a Gentleman Justice for the court.
On November 8, 1739, at a court, in Prince George County, a Commission of
Oyer and Terminer to William Poythress, Gentleman, among others, for the
trial of Martin, a negro boy slave, belonging to William Rives, Jr., now in
county jail on suspicion of murder of Pegg, a negro woman slave, also
belonging to Rives.
In December, 1739, in Prince George County, William Poythress, Gentleman,
ordered that Edward Burchett, Jr., be sworn Constable of Bristol parish
instead of John Lewis, Jr.
On December 1, 1743, Thomas Williams and wife, Rachael, of Prince George
County, sold to LeRoy Griffin, 521 acres, in Brunswick County, the same
having been patented to Joseph Boswell on September 28, 1728, and bounded by
John Robertson, on the north side of Sturgeon Creek, adjoining Stroud and
Henry Moriss. The witnesses, Jona. Lydell, John Edwards and John Blackman.
On February 2, 1744, a release of the right of dower by Rachel Griffin, to
William Poythress [Sheriff], Hugh Miller, and Samuel Gordon, of Prince
George County, Gentlemen, Greeting. Rachel could not conveniently travel to
the County court or to the General Court to acknowledge the conveyance, so
they were given the power to receive her acknowledgement by personally going
to Rachel. Rachel voluntarily relinquished her right of dower to the lands
conveyed as acknowledged by William Poythress and Samuel Gordon.
In 1747, he was Colonel William Poythress.
On May 29, 1754, the account of John Wall to Brunswick County. Edmund
Ruffin, executor. The receipt was signed by William Poythress, sheriff, and
proved May 29, 1754.
In May, 1755, Isham Eppes and William Poythress were appointed commissioners
for the Proprietors whose tobacco burnt at Bolling's Point warehouse.
William was appointed trustee for the town of Blandford.

Civic Activities
On April 19, 1717, in the Prince George County court, on the petition of
John Hobbs, a surveyor of the highways, it was ordered that Captain John
Poythress' tithables, James Bishop, William Hobbes, Peter Poythress and
William Poythress assist Hobbs in clearing the highways.
Vestrymen of Bristol parish: Many of these persons served for many years.
Below, only the date of the accession of the new member, without regard to
his colleagues or the duration of his service, is given.
1721 George Archer
1722 John Herbert
1723 Buller Herbert
1724 Drury Bolling
1726 William Poythress
1727 William Herbert
1728 Peter Jones
1729 Theophilus Field
1730 James Munford
1731 Robert Bevill
1733 William Starke
1734 Charles Fisher
1735 David Walker, Francis Poythress, John Bannister
1737 William Hamilin (date of first Vestry at Blandford Church)
1740 Theodoric Bland
1742 Thomas Short, Stephen Dewey...etc."
On November 10, 1726, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the Chapel it was ordered that William Poythress
and Richard Herbert be sworn Vestrymen.
On February 19, 1727, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the Chapel, present, among others, was Mr.
William Poythress, who was chosen vestryman.
On July 4, 1727, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River, at
a Vestry held at the Chapel, Mr. William Poythress took the oath of a
vestryman.
On November 16, 1727, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was Mr.
William Poythress.
On February 18, 1728, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was Mr.
William Poythress.
On June 15, 1728, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River,
at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was Mr. William
Poythress.
On October 15, 1728, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the Chapel, present, among others, was Mr.
William Poythress. It was ordered by the Vestry and Mr. William Poythress
was empowered to collect, receive and recover of the above 1,181 tithables,
34½ pounds tobacco on pole by distress or otherwise and to make good payment
as above rendering account to the Vestry and no errors. It was ordered that
Mr. William Poythress and Mr. George Wilson be Churchwardens and Collectors
for the ensuing year.
On February 16, 1729, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was Mr.
William Poythress.
On June 8, 1729, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River, at
a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present among others, was Mr. William
Poythress.
On July 24, 1727, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River,
at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, for processioning. Present, among
others, was Mr. William Poythress. By virtue of an order of Prince George
County, dated July 11th, 1727, for processioning, every particular person's
land in their parish in obedience to the said order the said parish is
divided into precincts for processioning and returns made as followeth, viz:
the bound of etc., a line between William Poythress and William Crawley...
On October 15, 1729, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the Ferry Chapel, for laying the parish levy,
viz: present, among others, Captain William Poythress, "To Captain William
Poythress for Inconvenient: tobacco, 2,233 pounds." Captain William
Poythress and Mr. George Wilson were appointed Church wardens and Collectors
for the ensuing year. It was ordered by the Vestry that Captain William
Poythress was empowered to collect, receive and recover of the above, 1,264
tithables, 29 pounds of tobacco pole by distraint or otherwise and to make
good payment as above rendering account to the Vestry and no errors.
On December 26, 1729, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was
Captain William Poythress.
On July 9, 1730, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River, at
a Vestry held at the Ferry Chapel, present, among others, was Captain
William Poythress.
On October 30, 1730, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, for laying the parish levy.
Present, among others, was Captain William Poythress. To Captain William
Poythress for Insolvants, 1,140 pounds tobacco. To Ditto making tobacco
convenient with Bread and Wine, 2,022 pounds tobacco. Assessments for 1,730
south side Bristol parish Dr. to Captain Poythress, 3,162 pounds tobacco.
On May 30, 1731, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River, at
a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was Captain
William Poythress. Returns of the Processioning for the year 1731. John
Fitzgerald and Robert Poythress none attending but John Butler.
On October 21, 1731, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, for settling the parish levy.
Present, among others, was Captain William Poythress. "To Captain Poythress
for Insolvents, 145 pounds tobacco.
On February 6, 1732, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, it was ordered that Captain
William Poythress and George Wilson be Churchwardens the ensuing year.
In 1732, Brunswick County was cut off the southern portion of Prince George
in the area south of Nottaway River. The first pages of a number of its
early record books were damaged by time. By 1732, the population had so
increased that the Council decided to allow Brunswick to set up its own
magisterial system and stand on its own. Pursuant to an Act of the Assembly,
a courthouse was built in Brunswick County and a magistrate was named. It
was also ordered that a Commission of the Peace be prepared for the County,
and that Henry Fox, Henry Embry, John Wall and William Machlin, Gentlemen,
be appointed Justices for the County. The St. Andrew's parish Vestry book,
kept in the County Clerk's Office, began with an entry in July, 1732. A
vestry was the elected administrative body of an Episcopal church. The first
recorded vestry consisted of Henry Embry and John Wall as Churchwardens.
They were all paid 1,000 pounds of tobacco for their services.
On June 25, 1732, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River,
at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was Captain
William Poythress.
On February 6, 1733, at a Vestry, present, among others, was Captain
Poythress.
On November 12, 1733, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was
Captain William Poythress. To Captain William Poythress for Balance of
Insolvents in 1732, 500 pounds tobacco. It was ordered that Captain William
Poythress be paid at the laying of the next parish levy 1,000 pounds of
tobacco for his maintaining Mary Barrot and Child the ensuing year. It was
ordered that Captain William Poythress and Mr. George Wilson continue as
Church Wardens.
On March 11, 1734, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River,
at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was William
Poythress.
On November 11, 1734, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, William
Poythress, Church Warden. It was ordered that Colonel Robert Bolling,
Captain William Stark and Major William Poythress agree with workmen for
building a new Church according to the former Order made March 11, 1733;
that Major William Poythress and Mr. George Wilson be Churchwardens the
ensuing year. To Major William Poythress for keeping Mary Barrett and her
lame child, 1000 pounds tobacco. To Major William Poythress, 1,000 pounds
tobacco. It was ordered that Major William Poythress, Churchwarden, do
receive of every tithable in this parish thirty four pounds of neat tobacco
in Inspector's Notes for their parish levy for this present year and in case
of refusal or nonpayment to levy the same by distress and pay the several
sums for whom the same was proportioned.
On May 27, 1735, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River, at
a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was Major William
Poythress.
On June 14, 1735, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River,
at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was Major
William Poythress. It was ordered that David Walker and Captain Francis
Poythress be Vestrymen they having taken the Oaths as the law directs.
On August 12, 1735, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River,
at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, were Major
William Poythress and Captain Francis Poythress. It was ordered that Major
James Mumford be appointed Churchwarden with Major William Poythress.
On September 15, 1735, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, were
Major William Poythress and Captain Francis Poythress. It was ordered that
Colonel Robert Bolling, Captain William Stark and Major William Poythress
from time to time inspect the building of the Church on Wells's Hill and to
give such directions as is most agreeable to the agreement.
On November 10, 1735, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, were
Major William Poythress and Captain Francis Poythress. To Major William
Poythress for Insolvents, 1,633 pounds tobacco. To Major William Poythress
for keeping Mary Barrett, 417 pounds tobacco. It was ordered that Major
William Poythress and Major James Munford, Church wardens, do receive of
every tithable in this parish forty and a quarter pounds of Neat Tobacco in
Inspector's Notes for their parish levy for this present year and in case of
refusal or nonpayment to levy the same by distress and pay the several sums
to the creditors for whom the same was proportioned.
On February 9, 1736, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was
Major William Poythress. Returns of Processioning for the year 1735: John
Poythress, the same.
On March 27, 1736, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River,
at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was Major
William Poythress.
On April 18, 1736, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River,
at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, was Major
William Poythress, Churchwarden.
On November 15, 1736, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, were
Major William Poythress, Churchwarden, and Captain Francis Poythress. It was
ordered To Major William Poythress for keeping Mary Barrett, 1,000 pounds
tobacco. To Major William Poythress for Insolvents, 1,005 pounds tobacco. To
Major William Poythress for paying William Parsons more than what was levy
for him, 100 pounds tobacco. To Major William Poythress, 1,000 pounds
tobacco [no reason stated]. To Major William Poythress for Insol., 1,005
pounds tobacco. To Major William Poythress, 104 pounds tobacco [no reason
stated]. It was ordered that Major William Poythress and Major James
Munford, Churchwardens, do receive of every tithable in this parish forty
three pounds of Neat Tobacco in Inspector's Notes for their parish levy for
this present year and in case of refusal or nonpayment to levy the same by
distress and pay ye several sums to the creditors for whom the same was
proportioned.
Before the institution of Bristol parish, in 1642, the settlers of the south
side of the James River were subject to Charles City County and Henrico
County. There were on average 430 families in the parish. The congregations
quickly exceeded the capacity of each of the original church structures
built on Sapponey Creek and John Stith's land. Next came a brick church at
Blandford in 1737 for which Richard Bland was the contractor. In 1739,
Messrs. Bolling, Poythress and Eppes were ordered to have a church built on
Jones' Hole creek, in the south part of the parish. "In these proceedings,
we have the progress of population, the sites of churches, the names of
contractors, supervisors, architects and clerks, the materials in the
minutest detail, of which they were made, their dimensions and style of
architecture, and other facts, which are instructive and suggestive to the
historian."
On August 13, 1737, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River,
at a Vestry held at the ferry Chapel, present, among others, were Major
William Poythress and Captain Francis Poythress.
In 1737, the vestry met for the first time at the Brick church. Present,
among others, were Colonel Robert Bolling and Major William Poythress.
Later, in 1739, Messrs. Bolling, Poythress, and Eppes were instructed to
choose a site for a chapel in the lower part of the parish. Mr. John
Ravenscroft erected this chapel on Jones Hole creek for £134/10/0.
On November 14, 1737, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church on Well's Hill, present, among
others, were Major William Poythress and Captain Francis Poythress. To Major
Poythress for Mary Barrett, 1,000 pounds tobacco. It was ordered that Major
Poythress and Captain Stark be Church wardens for the ensuing year. Balance
due to the parish from Major William Poythress in cash, £12, 1shilling, in
tobacco 7,000 pounds. To Major William Poythress, 1,000 pounds tobacco.
In March, 1738, in the Prince George County court, in the suit by petition
of the Bristol parish by William Poythress and William Stark, Churchwardens
of Bristol parish, against Thomas Posey for 480 pounds of tobacco due by
account to be paid to the said parish to Thomas Galloway for maintaining
Mary the widow of said Thomas the defendant being summoned and not appearing
and its bearing made it appear to the court that the said Church's due on
the motion of the plaintiff and it was considered by the court that they
secure against the said Thomas Posey the aforesaid costs as executors.
On April 11, 1738, in Prince George County, on the complaint of William
Stark and William Poythress, Churchwardens of Bristol parish, that Thomas
Posey, an inhabitant of said parish, left his habitation and wife without
means of subsistence. Since they have obtained a judgement against him and
he failed to appear, it was ordered that he be taken into custody and bound
into service to pay off the debt that the parish incurred in the care of his
wife. Richard Bland, Gentleman, dissented from this order.
On May 20, 1738, present, among others, were Major William Poythress and
Captain Francis Poythress. It was ordered that Major James Munford, Captain
Francis Poythress, John Banister, Esquire, and William Hamlin, Gentlemen: do
view and agree upon a proper place for building a Chapel on Hatcher's Run
for the convenience of upper inhabitants of this parish and to report the
proceedings to a Vestry to be held the first Saturday in July next and that
the Church Wardens do advertise for workmen to come in to undertake the
same.
In June, 1738, in the Prince George County court, on the Fieri Facias
awarded Robert Poythress on his judgment obtained against William Poythress
and Francis Poythress, executors, of the last Will and Testament of John
Fitzgerald, deceased, Miles Thweatt, one of the under-Sheriffs of this
court, made the above return which was recorded. In the same month, on the
copies of a satisfaciendum award of William Poythress and Francis Poythress,
executors of John Fitzgerald, deceased on their judgement to obtain against
Henry Wilson, William Eppes, Sheriff of this county, made the following
return; viz. Stopped by Superwaka(?). William Eppes, Sheriff, witness
recorded.
On July 1, 1738, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River, at
a Vestry held at the Brick Church on Well's Hill, present, among others,
were Major William Poythress and Captain Francis Poythress. It was ordered
that a Church be built on the north side of Hatcher's Run on the land of
Allen Tye.
On November 13, 1738, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church on Well's Hill, present, among
others, was Major William Poythress.
On May 9, 1739, in Prince George County, in the debt case of William Stark
and William Poythress, Churchwardens of Bristol parish, versus George
Tillman, the case was not prosecuted.
On June 12, 1739, in Prince George County, William Stark and William
Poythress, Churchwardens of Bristol parish, were to take into custody as
much of the possessions of Joshua Stroud, but not over £10, as he had
privately departed the county and left his wife. This money was to insure
that his wife did not become a charge on the parish.
On August 20, 1739, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River,
at a Vestry held at the Brick Church on Well's Hill, present, among others,
were Major William Poythress and Captain Francis Poythress. It was ordered
that Robert Wynne and Joshua Wynne procession from Monkersneck to Stoney
Creek between Monkersneck and the Chapel Road, that John Poythress and
Thomas Twittey procession between Butterwood and Nottoway River as low as
the head of Beaver-pond Creek.
On August 27, 1739, in Prince George County, a Commission of Oyer and
Terminer to William Poythress, Francis Poythress, Anthony Peniston, John
Ravenscroft, among others, dated 23rd instant, for trial of Nutty, a negro
woman slave belonging to Lewis Green, now in jail on suspicion of the murder
of Sam, a negro boy, belonging to Burwell Green. Evidence showed that Nutty,
on the 13th of August last, at the house of Lewis Green in Bristol parish
assaulted said Sam with a brick, giving him a mortal wound on the left side
of his head.
On October 23, 1739, present, among others, were Captain Francis Poythress
and Major William Poythress. Tobacco due from Major William Poythress, 4,730
pounds; from Ditto in Cash £21/12/3¾."
On December 10, 1739, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church on Well's Hill,
present, among others, Captain Francis Poythress and Major William
Poythress. It was ordered that Colonel Robert Bolling, Major William
Poythress and Captain William Eppes do appoint a place for building the new
Chapel and that Mr. Ravenscroft undertake to build the same for £134/10
shillings to be paid in three several payments to be finished by the last of
December, 1741...
On February 5, 1740, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church on Well's Hill, present, among
others, was Major William Poythress.
On February 23, 1740, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James
River, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church on Well's Hill, present, among
others, was Major William Poythress.
On May 26, 1740, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River, at
a Vestry held at the Brick Church on Well's Hill, present, among others, was
Major William Poythress.
On May 27, 1740, in Bristol parish, on the south side of the James River, at
a Vestry held at the Brick Church on Well's Hill, present, among others, was
Major William Poythress.
On October 22, 1740, at a Vestry held for Bristol parish, present, among
others, was William Poythress.
On December 2, 1740, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church, present, among
others, was William Poythress.
On March 6, 1741, at a Vestry held for Bristol parish, present, among
others, was William Poythress.
On October 12, 1741, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church on Well's Hill,
present, among others, was Major William Poythress.
On December 22, 1741, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church on Well's Hill,
present, among others, was Major William Poythress.
On October 14, 1742, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church on Well's Hill,
present, among others, was Major William Poythress.
On February 28, 1743, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church, present, among
others, was Major William Poythress.
On July 18, 1743, in Bristol parish, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church on
Well's Hill, present, among others, was Major William Poythress.
On October 13, 1743, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church, present, among
others, was Major William Poythress.
On September 9, 1744, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church, present, among
others, was Major William Poythress.
On October 12, 1744, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church, present, among
others, was Major William Poythress. It was ordered: To Burwell Green for
his levy being a patroller, 50 pounds tobacco. That Captain Peter Jones and
Theodorick Bland pay the money in their hands to Major William Poythress.
On February 27, 1745, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church, on Well's Hill,
present, among others, was Major William Poythress. It was ordered: To
Colonel William Poythress for balance due to him £7/14/6.
On September 29, 1746 (sic?), at a Vestry held for Bristol parish, present,
among others, was Colonel William Poythress.
On March 23, 1747, at a Vestry held for Bristol parish, present, among
others, was William Poythress.
On April 5, 1747, at a Vestry held for Bristol parish, present, among
others, was William Poythress.
On July 13, 1747, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church for Bristol parish,
present, among others, Colonel William Poythress.
On August 23, 1747, at a Vestry held for Bristol parish, present, among
others, was Colonel William Poythress.
On October 16, 1747, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church for Bristol
parish, present, among others, was Colonel William Poythress. It was ordered
that the Church wardens pay of immediately to the executor of Mr. Robert
Poythress a Bond for £20 due from this parish with the interest due thereon.
On Saturday, October 31, 1747, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church for
Bristol parish, present, among others, was Colonel William Poythress, Mr.
James Boisseau. It was ordered to Colonel Poythress horse blocks and
clearing £0/12/0.
On August 13, 1748, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church for Bristol parish,
present, among others, was Colonel William Poythress.
On October 16, 1747, in the Bristol parish Vestry Book, payment was ordered
to the executors of Robert Poythress.
On November 10, 1748, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church for Bristol
parish, present, among others, Colonel William Poythress. It was ordered to
Colonel William Poythress repairing the Glebe, £2/10/0; to cash paid to
Robert Poythress, executors, £22/14/2; to Colonel Poythress, £0/12/0.
On July 29, 1749, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church for Bristol parish,
present, among others, was Colonel William Poythress.
On November 6, 1749, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church for Bristol
parish, present, among others, was Colonel William Poythress and Mr. James
Boisseau. It was ordered that Colonel William Poythress and Mr. James Murray
be Churchwardens for the ensuing year.
On March 13, 1750, at a Vestry held at the Courthouse for Bristol parish,
present, among others, Colonel William Poythress and Mr. James Bossieau.
On March 1, 1751, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church for Bristol parish,
present, among others, Colonel William Poythress.
On August 17, 1751, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church for Bristol parish,
present, among others, William Poythress. It was ordered that William
Poythress, Theophilus Field and Anthony Walke be appointed to settle the
parish accounts with the administratrix of Charles Fisher, and that they
make their return before the laying the next levie.
On October 14, 1751, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church for Bristol parish
the 14th day of October 1751, present, among others, was William Poythress
and James Boisseau.
On June 22, 1752, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church for Bristol parish,
Mr. Thomas Williams was appointed a Vestryman in the Room of Colonel William
Poythress who was moved out of the parish.
On November 30, 1752, at a Vestry held at the Brick Church for Bristol
parish, Bristol parish for 1752 Dr., to Colonel Poythress, 44 pounds
tobacco.
On November 15, 1754, at a Vestry held at the Glebe for Bristol parish, it
was ordered that Colonel William Poythress have leave granted to enclose a
piece of ground as a burying place for his family within the walls of the
churchyard, provided, that he enlarged the same, so that the yard should
include the same superficial measure (inclusive of said piece of ground) as
the present churchyard (to be walled) was to include. Also, Bristol Parish
for the year 1754 Dr., to Colonel Poythress, insolvents last year, 1,061
pounds tobacco. It was ordered that Mr. William Poythress [Jr.?] be
appointed a vestryman for this Parish in the room of Major William Epps,
deceased.

Property: Personal Property and Land
On August 1, 1724, in Bristol parish, a negro belonging to Mr. William
Poythress was born.
On 1721, in Prince George County, Thomas Vinson, of North Carolina, to
William Poythress, of Prince George County, in the Colony of Virginia, a 3
year lease on 100 acres, in Bristol parish, bounding on Joshua Poythress and
precisely described. The witnesses were John Banister and Abraham Cocke.
On 1722, in Prince George County, Surveyor's records, to a survey for
William Poythress, on both sides of the Reedy branch of Butterwood Swamp,
206 acres. Robert Bolling was the surveyor.
On July 9, 1724, in Prince George County, William Poythress, of Prince
George County, was granted 206 acres of new land, on both sides of the Reedy
Branch of Butterwood Swamp, in Prince George County, near Major Epes'
corner.
On January 4, 1727, in Prince George County, Surveyor's records, 343 acres,
to a survey for William Poythress, in the forks of the Reedy branch of
Butterwood Swamp. Robert Bolling was the surveyor.
On October 13, 1727, William Poythress, of Prince George County, was granted
343 acres of new land, in the forks of the Reedy Branch of Butterwood Swamp
adjoining his own and Epes's lines, in Prince George County.
On May 2, 1729, William Poythress, was granted 2,000 acres, in Prince George
County, on Tommaheton Creek.
On June 20, 1733, William Poythress, of Prince George County, Gentleman, was
granted 1,024 acres of new land, in Prince George County, on the south side
of Tommaheton Swamp, at the lower end of the open Beaverpond above the
butterwoods.
On June 20, 1733, William Poythress, of Prince George County, was granted
297 acres of new land, in Prince George County, on both sides of the Reedy
branch of Butterwood Swamp adjoining his old lands, Eppes and John Clayton.
On June 20, 1733, William Poythress, of Prince George County, was granted
381 acres of new land, in Prince George County, on the south side of
Butterwood Swamp, adjoining John Cleyton and Peter Wynne. Peter Wynne
(1690-1738) was the son of Joshua and Mary Wynne and was the husband of
Frances Anderson.
On June 1, 1741, William Poythress, Gentleman, was granted 1,572 acres, in
Prince George County, on the upper side of Tommaheton Swamp, on the north
fork of the long branch, 1,024 acres part of the land formerly granted to
William Poythress by a patent bearing date June 20, 1733, and the residue
never before granted.
On June 1, 1741, William Poythress, Gentleman, was granted 200 acres, in
Prince George County, on the south side of Butterwood Swamp, beginning at
his own old land and adjoining Eppes.
February, 1742, in the Henrico County court, a deed of mortgage from James
Thompson to William Poythress.
Petersburg and Blandford were raised to the rank of towns in 1748 but the
former has absorbed and overshadowed the latter. The tide of population
which flowed up the Appomattox from its mouth was checked by the bluffs of
Blandford, and settled upon it's present site. William Poythress, on whose
land it was planted, was a vestryman in 1727 and died in 1763, in his 68th
year.
On September 6, 1748, Henry Randolph, of Dale parish, to William Poythress,
of Bristol parish, in Prince George County, 447½ acres, in Dale parish, in
Henrico County, and bounded by the land of George Cousins, James Franklin
and Charles Burton, being one fourth part of a larger tract of land
containing 1,790 acres granted to the said Henry Randolph by patent bearing
date January 12, 1748. The witnesses were Chr. Martin, Field Archer and
Drury Ragsdale. Henry Randolph was married to Tabitha Poythress (1725-1805)
who was a niece of William Poythress.
Dinwiddie County was created in 1752 when its present boundaries were
established except for that portion annexed by the City of Petersburg.
Dinwiddie County was cut off from Prince George County's southwestern
corner.
In 1865, county court records prior to 1833 were destroyed. One plat book,
one order book, and one judgement book survived.
On August 3, 1752, to William Poythress, was granted 531 acres, in Dinwiddie
County, on the south side of Butterwood Swamp, 331 acres part granted John
Clayton by patent July 9, 1724, the right and title vested in William
Poythress, 200 acres the residue also granted William Poythress patent June
1, 1741, along his old line and adjoining Eppes.
On August 14, 1759, in Prince George County, William Poythress, of Dinwiddie
County, sold to Samuel Gordon, of Prince George County, lots #22 and #40 in
the Town of Blandford. The witnesses were John Baird, Patrick Ramsey and
Robert Mackie. Livery and Seizin of the above lots, August 14, 1759. The
witnesses were Jer. Baker, James Clark and Patrick Ramsey.
On November 17, 1759, in Chesterfield County, William Poythress of Dinwiddie
County, to Thomas Dance of Chesterfield County, 447½ acres, which he
purchased of Henry Randolph on September 6, 1740, in Henrico County. The
witnesses were Joseph Rowlet, William Worsham and Essex Worsham.
On December 11, 1759, in Prince George County, Hugh Miller, of Bristol
parish, in Prince George County, sold to John Baird, of the same, for 2 lots
or half acres in the Town of Blandford in the same parish and county,
numbered #8 and #9 on the plat of the town; #8 was purchased from William
Poythress and #9 from Lewis and Armistead Burwell. The witnesses were
Bolling Stark, John Clark and James Johnson.
On January 13, 1760, in Prince George County, William Poythress, of
Dinwiddie County, sold to William Brodnax, of the same county, lot #5 in the
Town of Blandford, for ? (none stated). The witnesses, John Butler and John
Bland. January 30, 1760, William Poythress, of Dinwiddie County, sold to
William Brodnax, of the same county, lot #5 in the Town of Blandford, for ?
(none stated). The witnesses were John Butler, Peter Bland, Samuel Gordon
and William Batte, Jr.
On February 7, 1760, in Prince George County, William Poythress, of
Dinwiddie County, to Samuel Gordon, of Prince George County, 105 acres, near
the Town of Blandford, in Bristol parish, Prince George County, the
outermost corner of Main and Neilson Street, to Hardaway's corner, John Hood's
line. (blotted out on page copied from microfilm). The witnesses were John
Butler, William Black, William Davis, Isham Browder and Henry Batte, Jr.
On May 2, 1760, in the Chesterfield County records, a bill of sale, William
Poythress to Thomas Dance.

Adjoining Property
On February 27, 1735, Joshua Poythress, of Prince George County, was granted
382 acres, for good and lawful money, in Prince George County, on the south
side of Tommahitton Swamp, adjoining his brother, William Poythress, near
Batts's path.
On September 10, 1735, Samuel Moore, of Prince George County, was granted
100 acres, in Prince George County, on the south side of Butterwood Swamp,
adjoining William Poythress and Peter Wynne.
On July 25, 1746, to John Sanders [to Jackson], 400 acres, in Prince George
County, between the branches of Butterwood Swamp and Turkey Egg Creek,
adjoining William Poythress, Bartlet, Peter Thomas and William Elder.
On August 20, 1748, to Thomas Williams, 1,510 acres, in Prince George
County, on the head of the Rocky Run, adjoining Hardaway, Cleaton,
Poythress, Jackson, Bartlott, Williamson, Booth, Maidlens, Bird, Rany and
Peniston.
On May 1, 1749, Henry Randolph sold to George Cousens, 447 acres in Dale
parish, in Henrico County, adjoining on the land of Field Archer, George
Cousens, Gills, the widow Franklin, Colonel Poythress and Isham Randolph and
was part of a greater tract of land containing 1,790 acres taken up and
patented by Colonel Francis Eppes, grandfather to the said Henry Randolph
and given by his last Will and testament unto his daughter, Eliz. Randolph,
mother to the said Henry Randolph but for want of being cultivated and
improved in due time as the law directs was forfeited to his majesty and
granted as lapsed land to the said Henry Randolph by the General Court of
the Colony.
On September 5, 1749, John Elder, 200 acres, in Prince George County, on the
south side of Butterwood Swamp, adjoining William Poythress, Thomas Elder,
Whitmore, his own old line, Moore and Charles Poythress.
On April 18, 1753, in Dinwiddie County, John Williams, 38 acres, on both
sides of Reedy Branch adjoining William Poythress, William Cryer, Samuel
Gordon and Edward Poythress. This certificate was afterwards altered to the
name of Zacharias Penn.
On September 26, 1760, Robert West, 100 acres, in Dinwiddie County, on the
south side of the White Oak swamp, adjoining William Poythress.
On October 21, 1761, James Heath sold to Joseph Morton, both of Lunenburg
County, 160 acres, in Lunenburg County, where the said Heath now lives, and
adjoining the land of William Poythress. The witnesses, Thomas Wren, William
Morton and Vincent Wren.
On July 7, 1763, Leonard Claiborne, Jr., 225 acres, in Dinwiddie County, on
the south side of the White Oak swamp, adjoining Hugh Reece now Joseph
Noble, Stewart, Poythress, Taylor, Reece and Williams.

Pertinent Property
On March 22, 1721, in the Prince George County Surveyor's Book, to a survey
for John Woodlief on both sides of the upper Rocky Run of Stony Creek, 212
acres; also 172½ acres on the same swamp April 11, 1724, delivered the plat
and certified it to Mr. William Poythress, with all rights. Robert Bolling
was the surveyor.
On March 15, 1742, William Sturdivante, was granted 327 acres, in Prince
George County, on the south side of Stoney Creek, whereas by patent dated
March 23, 1734, granted John Sturdivante and whereas the said John
Sturdivant has failed to make cultivation and improvements and William
Poythress has made humble suit and obtained a grant for the same which he
has relinquished unto William Sturdivant.

As Witness
On July 12, 1725, in Prince George County, a deed of slaves, John Hardyman
and Henrietta Maria, his wife, to Joseph/Joshua Poythress, for the sum of
£60, 1 negro man slave, Frank Mingo, and 1 negro girl slave, Tabbe. The
witnesses, Thomas Eldridge and William Poythress.
On July 12, 1725, John Hardyman sold to John Poythress, 2 acres of land,
with a mill, in Prince George County, on Ward's Run bounded by Sarah Wall
and John Wilkins. John Hardyman obliged himself to title on the penalty of
£80. The witnesses, Joshua Poythress and William Poythress. The court was at
Merchant's Hope.
On February 15, 1726, Henry Jones and Katherine, his wife, of Surry County,
to Peter Poythress, of Prince George County, 250 acres, on the south side of
the Nottaway River, and bounded by Flatt Swamp, in Surry County. The
witnesses were William Poythress, William Freeman and William Dennis.
On July 12, 1726, in Prince George County, William Poythress witnessed a
deed of sale from Francis Patterson and Ann, his wife, to David Barretts.
On July 12, 1726, in Prince George County, Littlebury Hardyman, of Martin's
Brandon parish, in Prince George County, to Peter Poythress, of Martin's
Brandon Parish, in Prince George County, a tract or parcel of land lying or
being on Harris Run on the south side of the James River [no acreage
specified but complete description of bounds]. The witnesses were William
Poythress and Nick'o. Hatchs. Memorandum: That livery and seizure of land
and possession mentioned by the within named Littlebury Hardyman was
delivered by turf and twig to the herein named Peter Poythress with the
possession of the same to be held by him, the said Peter Poythress, and his
heirs, forever according to the purport of the deed, in the presents of
William Poythress and Nick'o. Hatchs, at a court at Merchant's Hope.
On March 11, 1728, John Fitzgerald, of Prince George County, to Joshua
Poythress, of the same county, 200 acres, in Prince George County, on the
south side of White Oak Creek, same being upper half or moiety of 400 acres
taken up and patented by John Fitzgerald. The witnesses were John Lewis,
William Poythress and Francis Epes.

Family Estates
On November 12, 1736, in Amelia County, in the action upon the case between
William and Francis Poythress, executors of John Fitzgerald, deceased,
against Charles Clay, etc., last Will and Testament of John Fitzgerald.
(Author notes there is no such Will in Amelia County). On April 11, 1738, in
Prince George County, in the case of William Poythress and Francis
Poythress, executors of John Fitzgerald, deceased, versus Henry Wilson.
After Wilson was given credit for work done for Fitzgerald, he still owed
money to the estate. Information was given by William Cryer and Drury
Oliver. Audit examined by J. Munford and Thomas Williams. Plaintiffs were to
recover damages. On May 9, 1738, in Prince George County, in a suit by
Mathew Cabinis and Hannah, his wife, one of the daughters of Thomas Clay,
deceased, against William Poythress and Francis Poythress, executors of John
Fitzgerald, deceased, who was administrator of Thomas Clay, deceased., for
certain legacies devised to the said Hannah. Audited by William Stark,
Gentleman, and found plaintiff was due £12/14/9. On July 11, 1738, in Prince
George County, in the case of Francis Epes versus William and Francis
Poythress, executors of John Fitzgerald, deceased, for debt, the court found
for the plaintiff. On July 11, 1738, in Prince George County, William Cryer,
witness for William Poythress and Francis Poythress, executors of John
Fitzgerald, in their suit versus Henry Wilson, to be paid. On October 10,
1738, in Prince George County, in the action on the cases brought by William
Poythress and Francis Poythress, executors of the last Will and testament of
John Fitzgerald, deceased, against William Floriday for £6, 9 shillings, 7
pence current money due by accounts the defendant came into court and being
ruled to Special Bails, and failing, on the motion of the plaintiff's
attorney it was ordered that the defendant be taken into custody of the
Sheriff and safely kept until he shall give such bail. On October 10, 1738,
in the action on the cause brought by William Poythress and Francis
Poythress, executors of the last Will and testament of John Fitzgerald,
defendants against John Brewer for £6, seven shillings, and eight pence,
half penny current money due by accounts and the defendants being arrested
and called and not appearing and Peter Daniel being returned Security for
him, on the motion of the plaintiff's attorney it was considered by the
court that the plaintiffs recover against the defendant and his said
Security the same aforesaid of so much thereof as it shall appear to be due
unless the defendant shall appear at the next court and answer the said
action. On November, 1738, in Prince George County, in the action on the
cause brought by William Poythress and Francis Poythress, executors of the
last Will and testament of John Fitzgerald, defendants against John Brewer
for £6, seven shillings, and eight pence, half penny current money due by
accounts and the defendants being arrested and called and not appearing and
Peter Daniel being returned Security for him, on the motion of the plaintiff's
attorney it was considered by the court that the plaintiffs recover against
the defendant and his said Security the same aforesaid of so much thereof as
it shall appear to be due unless the defendant shall appear at the next
court and answer the said action. November, 1738, in the action on the cases
brought by William Poythress and Francis Poythress, executors of the last
Will and testament of John Fitzgerald, deceased, against William Floriday
for £6, 9 shillings, 7 pence Current Money due by accounts the defendant
came into Court and being ruled to Special Bails, and failing, on the motion
of the plaintiff's attorney it was ordered that the defendant be taken into
custody of the Sheriff and safely kept until he shall give such bail. On
November 14, 1738, in Prince George County, in the suit of William Poythress
and Francis Poythress, executors of John Fitzgerald, deceased, found for the
plaintiff against William Floriday. On February 11, 1739, in Prince George
County, in the suit by a petition brought by William Poythress and Francis
Poythress, executors of the last Will and Testament of John Fitzgerald,
deceased, against John Hill for £3, 5 shillings, ten pence, half penny
current money due by accounts to which Francis Poythress one of the
plaintiffs made oath. The defendant being summoned, called and not appearing
on the plaintiff's motion it was considered by the court that they recover
against the defendant with costs Als: Ecxo. On March 13, 1739, in Prince
George County, in the action on the case brought by William Poythress and
Francis Poythress, executors of the last Will and Testament of John
Fitzgerald, deceased, against Honour Whitten, administratrix of the goods
and chattel of Richard Whitten, the deceased, for 31 shillings 3 pence
current money due by accounts to which Francis Poythress one of the
plaintiffs made oath, the defendant being summoned and called and it
appearing to the court that she had fully administered the estate of
Richard, on the motion of the said Francis it was ordered that the defendant
pay to the aforesaid plaintiffs the aforesaid sum out of the said defendant's
estates when such thereof shall come to hand. On May 18, 1739, in Amelia
County, deed of John Harris and Susanna, his wife ----(Author note: There
were several suits brought by William and Francis Poythress, executors of
John Fitzgerald. The Will was not recorded in Amelia County). On July 10,
1739, in Prince George County, in the action on the case brought by William
Poythress and Francis Poythress, executors of John Fitzgerald, deceased,
against Littlebury Eppes, the plaintiff failing to prosecute, the case was
dismissed. On August 15, 1739, in Prince George County, in the suit of
William and Francis Poythress, executors of John Fitzgerald, deceased,
versus Hannah Stroud, executrix of John Stroud, deceased, dismissed. On
August 15, 1739, in Prince George County, in the suit of William and Francis
Poythress versus William Stoa, dismissed. On August 15, 1739, in the suit by
petition brought by William Poythress and Francis Poythress, executors of
the last Will and testament of John Fitzgerald, deceased, against Daniel
Meadows for 25 shillings and a half penny current money due by accounts to
which Francis Poythress one of the plaintiffs makes oath the defendant being
summoned and called and not appearing on the plaintiff's motion it was
considered by this court that they recover against the defendant the
aforesaid sum and costs Als: Exeo. On August 15, 1739, in Prince George
County, in the suit by petition brought by William Poythress and Francis
Poythress, executors of the last Will and testament of John Fitzgerald,
versus Martha Alexander and Robert Munford, executrix and executor of the
last Will and testament of John Alexander, deceased. Amount to be recovered
£3, 15 shillings, half pence. On June 5, 1740, in Brunswick County, it was
ordered that the petition of William and Francis Poythress, executors &c of
John Fitzgerald, deceased, against Seth Petty Poole be continued until the
next court. Gentlemen judges: John Wall, Richard Burch, Nicholas Lanier,
William Hagood. Sheriff: William Martingood. On June 6, 1740, in Brunswick
County, William and Francis Poythress, executors, &c., of John Fitzgerald,
plaintiffs, against William Gent, defendant, continued until the next court.
On September 4, 1740, in Brunswick County, William and Francis Poythress,
executors, &c., of John Fitzgerald, deceased, petitioners, against Seth
Petty Poole, defendant, upon a petition for debt. This day came the parties
by their attorneys and the said defendant defends the force and injury and
prays judgement of the petitioners wait because he saith that the aforesaid
Francis Poythress one of the petitioners in the said writ named after the
original writ aforesaid was sued out and before this day to wit on the -----
day of ----- in the year MDCCXXXIX died at the parish of Saint Andrew in the
county of Brunswick aforesaid and this he was ready to verify wherefore he
prays the judgement of this worshipful court of the said writ and that the
said writ may be quashed and so forth and on the motion of the petitioners
time is given them until the next court to consider the said plea. On
September 4, 1740, in Brunswick County, upon the petition of William and
Francis Poythress, executors, &c., of John Fitzgerald, deceased., against
Samuel S-- for fo- pounds six shillings and four pence ----------- be due by
bill: discontinued; being agreed by the parties. And, on the same date,
William and Francis Poythress, executors &c of John Fitzgerald, plaintiffs,
against William Gent, defendant, continued until the next court. On
September 5, 1740, in Brunswick County, William and Francis Poythress,
executors, &c., of John Fitzgerald, plaintiffs, against Phillip Gorgette,
defendant, continued until the next court. On September 5, 1740, in
Brunswick County, William and Francis Poythress, executors, &c., of John
Fitzgerald, plaintiffs, against Moses Dunkley, defendant, continued until
the next court. On October 2, 1740, in Brunswick County, it was ordered that
the petition of William and Francis Poythress, executors, &c., of John
Fitzgerald, deceased, petitioners, against Seth Petty Poole, defendant, upon
a petition for debt. On the motion of the petitioners by their attorney
further time was given them until the next court to consider the said
defendant's plea. On October 2, 1740, in Brunswick County, William and
Francis Poythress, executors, &c., of John Fitzgerald, plaintiffs, against
William Gent, defendant, continued until the next court. On October 3, 1740,
in the Brunswick County court, William and Francis Poythress, executors &c
of John Fitzgerald, plaintiffs, against Moses Dunkley, defendant, continued
until the next court. On November 6, 1740, in the Brunswick County court, it
was ordered that the petition of William and Francis Poythress, executors &c
of John Fitzgerald, deceased, petitioners, against Seth Petty Poole,
defendant, upon a petition for debt. This day came the parties by their
attorneys and the petitioners demur generally to the defendant's plea in
abatement and on the motion of the defendant. time was given him until the
next court to consider the said demurrer. On November 6, 1740, in Brunswick
County, William and Francis Poythress, executors, &c., of John Fitzgerald,
plaintiffs, against William Gent, defendant, continued until the next court.
On April 2, 1741, in Brunswick County, William and Francis Poythress,
executors, &c., of John Fitzgerald, deceased, plaintiffs, against Philip
Gorgette, defendant, in debt. This day came the parties by their attorneys
and the said defendant defends the force and injury and prays judgement of
the petitioners wait because he saith that the aforesaid Francis Poythress
one of the petitioners in the said writ named after the original writ
aforesaid was sued out and before this day to wit on the ----- day of -----
in the year 1739 died at the parish of Saint Andrew in the county of
Brunswick aforesaid and this he is ready to verefie wherefore he prays the
judgement of this worshipful court of the said writ and that the said writ
may be quashed and so forth and on the motion of the plaintiffs by their
attorney time is given them until the next court to reply to the said plea.
On the same date, William and Francis Poythress, executors, &c., of John
Fitzgerald, plaintiffs, against Moses Dunkley, defendant, in debt. The same
plea and order verbatim as next before. On May 7, 1741, in Brunswick County,
upon the petition of William and Francis Poythress, executors, &c., of John
Fitzgerald, deceased, against Seth Petty Poole for debt continued until the
next court. On May 7, 1741, in Brunswick County, William and Francis
Poythress, executors, &c., of John Fitzgerald, plaintiffs, against Phillip
Gorgette, defendant, continued until the next court. On May 7, 1741, in
Brunswick County, William and Francis Poythress, executors, &c., of John
Fitzgerald, plaintiffs, against Moses Dunkley, defendant, continued until
the next court. December 3, 1741, in Brunswick County, William and Francis
Poythress, executors, &c., plaintiffs, against Seth Petty Poole, defendant,
upon petition in debt. This day came the parties by their attorneys and
thereupon the petitioners demurrer to the defendants plea in abatement being
argued because it seems to the Court here that the said plea and the matter
therein contained are not sufficient in lan to quash the writ of the
petitioner therefore it was considered that the defendant to the said writ
do further answer whereupon the said defendant by his attorney for plea
saith that he doth not owe to the petitioners as executors of the said John
the money in the petition mentioned or any penny thereof and this he prays
may be enquired of by the court and on the motion of the petitioners by
their attorney time was given them until the next court to consider the said
plea. On December 3, 1741, in Brunswick County, William and Francis
Poythress, executors, &c., plaintiffs, against Moses Dunkley, defendant, in
debt. This day came the parties by their attorneys and the petitioners
demurrer to the defts. plea in abatement being argued because it seems to
the Court here that the said plea and the matter therein contained are not
sufficient in lan to quash the petitioner's writ therefore it was considered
that the defendant to the same writ as further answer and thereupon the said
defendant prays and has leave to imparte here until the next court. On
December 3, 1741, in Brunswick County, William and Francis Poythress,
executors, &c., plaintiffs, against Philip Gorgette, defendant, in debt.
This day came the parties by their attorneys and the petitioners demurrer to
the defendants plea in abatement being argued because it seems to the court
here that the said plea and the matter therein contained are not sufficient
in lan to quash the petitioner's writ therefore it was considered that the
defendant to the same writ do further answer and thereupon the said
defendant prays and has leave to imparte here until the next court. On
February 4, 1742, in Brunswick County, in the petition of William and
Francis Poythress, executors, &c., John Fitzgerald, deceased, against Seth
Petty Poole was continued until the next court at the plaintiff's costs. On
February 4, 1742, in Brunswick County, William and Francis Poythress,
executors, &c., of John Fitzgerald, deceased, plaintiffs, against Moses
Dunkley, defendant, in debt, was continued until the next court. On February
4, 1742, in Brunswick County, William and Francis Poythress, executors, &c.,
of John Fitzgerald, deceased, plaintiffs, against Phillip Gorgette,
defendant, in debt. On June 4, 1742, in Brunswick County, upon the petition
of William and Francis Poythress, executors, &c., of John Fitzgerald,
deceased, against Seth Petty Poole for two pounds, thirteen shillings and
seven pence current money said to be due by Bill this day came the parties
by their attorneys and it appearing from the testimony of diverse witnesses
that the defendant does not owe the plaintiffs the money in the petition
mentioned and in pleading he has alleged therefore it was ordered by the
court that the petitioners take nothing by their petition out for their
false clamor be in money, &c., and that the defendant go hence without delay
and recover against the plaintiffs his costs by him about his defense in his
behalf expended. On the motion of Francis Bresin, witness, for of Seth Petty
Poole, at the suit of William and Francis Poythress, executors, &c, of John
Fitzgerald, deceased, it was ordered that the said Seth pay him two hundred
and eighty pounds of tobacco for four days attendance for coming and
returning 30 miles according to law. On the motion of Thomas Mayo, witness,
for Seth Petty Poole, at the suit of William and Francis Poythress,
executors, &c., of John Fitzgerald, deceased, it was ordered that the said
Seth pay him one hundred pounds of tobacco for four days attendance
according to law.

In Prince George County, the Will of Joshua Poythress, of Martin's Brandon
Parish, Prince George County dated January 17, 1740, probated April 8, 1741.
The land I live on, bought from Mrs. Elizabeth Duke and Capt. John Hardyman,
to my sons, Joshua and William, to be equally divided. All of my land on the
Nottaway River, in Surry County, likewise to be equally divided.
To my granddaughter, Harwood, £50.
To my son, Littlebury, 20 shillings, and my other sons are to keep him
during his lifetime.
All of the rest of my estate to be equally divided between wife and five
children: Joshua, William, Ann Poythress, Elizabeth Poythress and Mary
Poythress.
My brothers, William and Robert Poythress, and friends and relations,
Richard Bland, Thomas Poythress, and John Woodlief to divide my estate.
Executors to be my brother, Robert, and my cousin, Thomas Poythress. The
witnesses, Ann Bland, Christian Poythress, and Richard Bland.

In William Byrd's diary, on July 26, 1741, Byrd noted that the weather was
warm and cloudy and that the wind was from the north. Byrd did not go to
church but put his things in order and wrote several letters. After church,
John Stith and his wife came by and dined. After dinner, John Ravenscroft
came by, as did Mr. Miller and his wife and Mrs. Poythress. In Charles City,
July 1741, there was a suit by Robert Poythress and Robert and Thomas
Poythress, executors of Joshua Poythress versus Benjamin Harrison. Joshua
Poythress had been quite wealthy, for his administrators gave bond at £5,000
current money when his Will was presented in court. Benjamin Harrison
(1693-1745) was married to Anne Carter (1700-1745), daughter of Robert
Carter and Judith Armistead. Benjamin Harrison and Anne Carter were parents
of a signer of the Declaration of Independence and were grandparents of the
ninth President of the United States. Benjamin Harrison and two of his young
daughters were killed when they were struck by lightning.

The Will of Robert Poythress, of Prince George County, dated May 24, 1743,
recorded September 13, 1743. The original Will was located in the
Chesterfield County Dead Papers. Robert Poythress of Martin's Brandon
Parish, Prince George County,
I give my son, Robert Poythress, and his heirs, all of my lands on which I
now live, 1,100 acres, and also 291 acres, adjoining the Butterwood Swamp.
I give my son, Peter Poythress, and his heirs, my lands containing 600
acres, lying on the Nottoway River and known by the name of Tanotoro, and
297 acres, lying on Butterwood, which I bought from James Glover.
I give my son, William Poythress, and his heirs, all my lands lying between
Monkoes Neck and Nottoway which I bought from Captain Thomas Bolling and all
of my lands, in Amelia County, contiguous to William Stone's land.
I give my wife the use of 12 negroes, Harry, Hunt, Tom, Jamey, George,
Nilsy, Sarah, Lucy, Nick, Hannah, Matt, Nan, Penelope and the use of 1/3 of
my lands during her life or widowhood and 1/4 of my house furniture and
stocks to be divided between my wife and my 3 sons and any of my daughters
that are unmarried at the time of her mother's death and their heirs
respectively.
The division is to be made by my brother, William Poythress, Colonel Richard
Bland, and Mr. John Gilliam or the survivors.
I give my son, Robert, and his heirs, 9 negroes, Tom boy, Mingo, Charles,
Judy, Bett, Jenny, Sarah, George, and Boatswin.
I give my son, Peter, and his heirs, 9 negroes, Prince, Sterling, Cimon,
Jack, Sarah, Bett, Agnes, Aneky, and Harry.
I give my son, William, and his heirs, 9 negroes, Phillis, Seanah, Gambia,
Caesar, Pheby, Kate, Pat, and Pompey.
If either of my sons dies before he comes of age, the whole estate, real and
personal, is to be divided equally between the surviving sons or their
heirs.
I confirm to my daughter, Elizabeth Gilliam all the negroes already given to
her.
I give my grandson, Robert Gilliam, a negro boy, Johnny, and a girl about
the same age.
I give my daughter, Mary Anna Minge, negroes, Abbah, Sawney, Jenny to her
and her heirs and L30 current money to be laid out in negroes.
I give my daughter, Agness Harwood, 98 pounds, 10 shillings current money
which her husband has already received.
I give my granddaughter, Tabitha Harwood, one negro girl, Amy, now in the
use of her father.
I give my daughter, Tabitha Poythress, L130 current money and negro girl,
Sue.
I give my daughter, Susanna Poythress, and her heirs, 5 negroes, Pheby,
Jack, Hannibal, Nan, and Tom.
I give my daughter, Jane Poythress, and her heirs, 5 negroes, Phillis, Nan,
Titus, Scot, and Phillis.
All the remainder of my estate I give and devise to be equally divided
between my wife and 3 sons.
I appoint my wife and sons, Robert and Peter, to be my executors. Robert
Poythress. The witnesses, Richard Bland, William Batte and William
Poythress. Recorded at a court held at Fitzgerald's for Prince George
County, September 13, 1743. The widow and executrix, Elizabeth Poythress,
exhibited the Will, with Robert Poythress, and qualified as executors. All
witnesses proved the Will.

On January 12, 1748, Henry Randolph, was granted 1,790 acres, in Henrico
County, on the south side of Swift Creek, on a Hunting Path, to a Wolf Pit,
on the west side of Youls Branch, on Nottoway Run, adjoining James
Frankling, Jr., Captain Jefferson, Thomas Totty, John Gill, Mr. John Archer
and Colonel Francis Epes. Whereas by patent dated January 22, 1718, granted
Francis Eppes, Gentleman, since deceased, and whereas William Kennon and
Ann, his wife, William Poythress and Sarah, his wife, and Elizabeth
Randolph, widow; to which said Ann, Mary, Sarah and Elizabeth the same was
devised by their Father, the said Francis Eppes, deceased, have failed to
pay Quit Rents and to make cultivate and improve and Henry Randolph having
petitioned our Lieutenant Governor and Commander-in-Chief has obtained a
grant for the same.

After William Poythress' Death
In 1763, in Dinwiddie County, the charges were denominated in pounds of
tobacco, for which it was likely warehouse receipts were used to pay the
bill. February, 1763, Captain William Poythress, executor of William
Poythress, deceased, Prince George County, Debit...recording said Poythress'
Will. June, 1763, David Jameson, York...Sers for Bond as assignee of
Hutchings versus W. Poythress' executors.

On April 23, 1770, it appearing to the Vestry that an acre of land purchased
by the parish of John Lowe, in the year of our Lord 1735 was not entirely
included within the Church wall and it being necessary that the boundaries
thereof should be ascertained, it was therefore ordered that the Church
wardens lay off the surplus of the said acre from the west side of the wall
square with the same, giving Lewis Parham the proprietor of the adjoining
land notice of the time when the said line was to be run, in addition to the
above order the quantity of land included in Colonel Poythress' burying
place was to be laid off over and above the said acre according to the
agreement with the said Poythress in the year of our Lord 1754.

"By Act of 1784, the original Town of Petersburg and 3 nearby lands (1) Town
of Blanford, traditionally Blanford Farm of Hardiway family from Blanford
England, but owned by William Poythress, ca. 1737-48."



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