POYTHRESS-L Archives

Archiver > POYTHRESS > 2005-12 > 1135892507


From: "Michael Tutor" <>
Subject: Colonel Peter Poythress, of Branchester, in Prince George County, Burgess, 4th Generation
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 16:41:47 -0500


The Fourth Generation: Colonel Peter Poythress, of Branchester, in Prince
George County
R. Bolling Batte on Peter Poythress
[281 Peter Poythress (1715-1785), m. c. 1756 Elizabeth Bland (1733-1792),
daughter of Richard and Anne (Poythress 271) Bland of "Jordans," Prince
George County. Peter Poythress resided at "Branchester" in Prince George. He
represented that county in all sessions of the House of Burgesses from 1768
through the last in 1776. He was also a member of both the 1775 and 1776
conventions. Peter and Elizabeth (Bland) Poythress had one son and eight
daughters, through whom they have many descendants. [Observation with
respect to the supposedly "legendary" nine Misses Poythress, all daughters
of Peter Poythress of Branchester and all married: Three of the daughters
(Sally, Agnes, and Jane) had 28 children between them. Only one daughter
(Lucy) is shown with "no issue" and Mr. Batte's document is silent on five
other daughters. If the five unmentioned only had half as many children as
the three mentioned....we should not be surprised that "Poythress" shows up
for a long time all over Virginia as an "honorary" middle name.]
281 1 Ann Poythress (1757 - 1804), m. 1777 in Pr. Geo. John Randolph
(1743-1803), son of Henry and Tabitha (Poythress 285) Randolph of
Chesterfield.
281 2 Elizabeth Poythress (1759 - 1806), m. 1776 in Pr. Geo. William Mayo
(1757-1837) of "Powhatan Seat", Henrico County, son of John and Mary (Tabb)
Mayo. Her husband was educated at William and Mary College, served in the
Revolution, represented Henrico in the House of Delegates, and was a member
of the first Board of Trustees for the Virginia Theological Seminary. Both
died at "Powhatan Seat" and were buried there. In 1894, all remains at the
Powhatan graveyard were reinterred in Hollywood Cemetery and all tombstones
thither removed. In 1807, William Mayo m. (2) Lucy Fitzhugh in Petersburg.
281 3 Mary Poythress (1762 - 1815), m. 1780 at "Branchester," Pr. Geo. Co.,
John Batte (1757-1816) of "Mancelle," Prince George County, son of Robert
and Martha (Peterson) Batte of that county. John and Mary (Poythress) Battle
resided at "Mancelle" which was part of the original grant made to Henry
Battle in 1668. John Batte was a captain in the militia and one of the
justices of the Prince George court. Mary died at "Mancelle" 17 Dec 1815 and
was buried in the Batte graveyard on the place. John died 19 Sept of the
following year while on a visit to the White Sulphur Springs in Greenbrier
County. He was buried in the churchyard of the Old Stone Church in
Lewisburg, (now) West Virginia. His tombstone is still standing.
281 4 Lucy Bland Poythress (1764 - ante 1823), m. 1806 in Prince George John
Eppes ( - 1832), son of John and Susanna (Epes) Eppes of "Hopewell." No
issue. John Eppes later married Hannah Roane.
281 6 Sally Bland Poythress (1768 - 1828), m. (1) at "Branchester," Prince
George County, Richard Lee (1726-1795) of Westmoreland County, son of Henry
and Mary (Bland) Lee of that county. Four Lee children were born of this
marriage. In 1796, Sally m. (2) in Westmoreland County Willoughby Newton,
son of John and Elizabeth (Vaulx) Newton of that county. There were five
children by this marriage. "Squire" Richard Lee was buried at "Burnt House
Field" in Westmoreland. Sally Bland (Poythress-Lee) Newton was buried at
"Lee Hall" in that county. [Spouse of Sally Bland Poythress # 281 6, "Squire
Lee" is brother of Harry Lee and uncle of General Robert E. Lee.]
281 7 Susanna Poythress (1769 - 1839), m. 1787 at "Branchester" Richard
Bland (1762-1806), son of Richard and Mary (Bolling) Bland of "Jordans."
Richard Bland was a grandson of Richard and Anne (Poythress 271) Bland, and
brother of Elizabeth Blair Bland who married William Poythress 281 5. They
both died at "Jordans" and were buried there, leaving issue.
281 8 Agnes Poythress (1779 - 1821), m. 1788 at "Branchester" Roger Atkinson
(1764 - 1829) of "Olive(?) Hill," Chesterfield County, son of Roger and Anne
(Pleasants) Atkinson. There were ten children. She died 28 Nov 1821 in
Halifax County while visiting a married daughter. Roger Atkinson later
married Sarah Spotswood in Petersburg. He died 23 April 1829.
281 9 Jane Poythress (1773 - 1837), m. 1792 Joseph Mayo (1771 - 1820) son of
Joseph and Martha (Tabb) Mayo of Richmond. There were nine children. Joseph
Mayo died in Richmond 1 Oct 1820 leaving a will on record. Jane (Poythress)
Mayo died 20 Mar 1837 in Faquier County at the home of her daughter
Elizabeth Bland Mayo who had married Charles James Stovin.

Family
Peter Poythress was born April 2, 1730, in Prince George County, Virginia.
He married Elizabeth Bland, the daughter of Richard Bland and Anne
Poythress, about 1756. Their children were (1) Nancy Anne Poythress (c.
1757-1804), who married John Randolph, the son of Henry Randolph and Tabitha
Poythress; (2) Elizabeth Bland Poythress (c. 1759-8/6/1806), who married
William Mayo, the son of John Mayo and Mary Tabb; (3) Mary (Polly) Poythress
(c. 1762-12/17/1815), who married John Batte, the son of Robert Batte and
Mary Peterson; (4) Lucy Bland Poythress (c. 1764-bef. 1823), who married
John Eppes, the son of John Eppes and Susanna Epes; (5) William Poythress
(c. 1765-bef. 5/15/1810), who married Elizabeth Blair Bland, the daughter of
Richard Bland and Mary Blair Bolling; (6) Sally Bland Poythress (c.
1768-5/28/1828), who married (1) Richard Lee, the son of Henry Lee nad Mary
Bland, and Willoughby Newton, the son of John Newton and Elizabeth Vaulx;
(7) Susanna Poythress (10/16/1769-1839), who married Richard Bland, the son
of Richard Bland and Mary Blair Bolling; (8) Agnes Poythress (c.
1770-11/28/1821), who married Roger Atkinson, the son of Roger Atkinson and
Anne Pleasants; and, (9) Jane Poythress (c. 1773-3/20/1837), who married
Joseph Mayo, the son of Joseph Mayo and Martha Tabb. Peter died December 19,
1787, in Prince George County, Virginia.

Daughter, Nancy Anne Poythress
On May 2, 1777, in the Virginia Gazette, "Marriage: John Randolph, Esquire,
of Chesterfield County, to Miss Nancy Poythress, daughter of Colonel Peter
Poythress, of Prince George County."

Daughter, Mary (Polly) Poythress
On June 28, 1780, in the Virginia Gazette, Marriage, Mr. John Batte, of
Prince George County, to Miss Polly Poythress, daughter of Colonel Peter
Poythress, of the same county.

Daughter, Agnes Poythress
On September 20, 1788, in Prince George County, Roger Atkinson married Agnes
Poythress. On September 24, 1788, in the Virginia Gazette and Independent
Chronicle, on Saturday last, Roger Atkinson, Jr., Esquire, to Miss Agnes
Poythress, of Prince George, the 6th daughter of the late Peter Poythress.
According to RBB's dates, she is the 7th daughter, Anne-1757,
Elizabeth-1759, Mary "Polly"-1762, Lucy-1764, Sarah "Sally"-1768,
Susanna-1769, Agnes-1771, and Jane-1773.

Inheritance
On September 13, 1743, the Will of Robert's father, Mr. Robert Poythress, of
Martin's Brandon parish, in Prince George County, was proved by Richard
Bland, William Batte and William Poythress. He appointed his brother,
William Poythress, Colonel Richard Bland and Mr. John Gilliam to divide his
estate. He appointed his wife, Elizabeth, and his sons, Robert and Peter to
be executors of his Will. He gave his son, Peter, his lands containing about
600 acres, lying on the Nottaway River and known by the name of Tanotoro,
and 297 acres, lying on Butterwood, that he bought from James Glover, and
nine negroes, Prince, Sterling, Cimon, Jack, Sarah, Bett, Agnes, Aneky and
Harry. His son also received 1/4th of his furniture, a share of the stocks
and 1/4th share of the remainder of his estate. The court was held at
Fitzgerald's.

Robert Poythress (I) received 350 acres at the Indian swamp from his father,
John Poythress, in his December 11, 1712, Will. On May 9, 1717, Robert
Poythress (I) bought 500 acres, in Prince George County, from Stith Bolling.
On September 12, 1721, Robert exchanged 267 acres with William Parham for
100 acres in Martins Brandon, Prince George County. On March 22, 1732,
Robert leased 267 acres at the Indian swamp to John Parham. On September 28,
1728, Robert bought 291 acres at the Butterwood swamp, in Prince George
County, which he left to his son, Captain Robert Poythress, in his 1743
Will. On July 12, 1735, Robert bought 600 acres from his brother, David
Poythress, part of which, Tanotoro, was left by John Poythress to his son,
David Poythress, in his 1712 Will. Robert left this land to his son, Colonel
Peter Poythress, in his 1743 Will. On September 28, 1728, Robert had land
adjacent to the 297 acres bought by Robert Glover, in Prince George County.
He left this property to his son, Colonel Peter Poythress, in his 1743 Will.
On June 17, 1735, Robert bought 412 acres, in Surry County, from Thomas
Bolling, Mariner, which he left to his son, William Poythress, in his 1743
Will. On June 1, 1741, Robert bought 400 acres, in Amelia county, that he
left to his son, William, in his 1743 Will.

On May 16, 1749, in the Surry County court, upon the attachment obtained by
Peter Poythress and Elizabeth Poythress, executors, &c, of Robert Poythress,
deceased, and Joshua Poythress, executor of Thomas Poythress, deceased,
against the estate of Thomas Sessom who has privately removed himself or so
absconded that the ordinary process of law cannot be served on him for a
debt of £62/1/4 current money due to the plaintiff from the said defendants.
This day came the plaintiff by their attorney and the Sheriff having made
return that he had executed the said Writ in the hands of Richard Hill and
had summoned him to appear whereupon he the aforesaid Hill being solemnly
called but made default and it appearing to the court that there is due to
the plaintiff £10/11/8½ from the said defendant. Therefore it was that the
plaintiff recover the aforesaid sum of £10/11/8½ against the said Richard
Hill together with interest for the same after the rate of five Centum per
annum to be computed from May 4, 1749, to the time of payment and their
costs by them expended and the said defendant in mercy, &c. Joshua
Poythress, son of Joshua Poythress, and first cousin of Thomas Poythress,
was the executor of Thomas Poythress' (1683-1749) Will.

In July, 1751, in the Surry County court, Elizabeth and Peter Poythress,
executors of Robert Poythress, deceased, plaintiffs, against Judith
Eldridge, executrix of Thomas Eldridge, deceased, defendant, on a Scire
facias to have execution of a decree of this court obtained by the Plaintiff's
testator in his lifetime against the said defendant the 21st day of July
1742. The defendant appeared by her counsel and prayed and has leave until
the next court to answer.

In May, 1755, in the Sussex County court, Elizabeth and Peter Poythress,
executors, &c, of Robert Poythress, deceased, who was assignee of Judith
Eldridge, executrix of Thomas Eldridge, deceased, plaintiffs versus Henry
Meachum, executor, &c, of Edward Mecham, deceased, defendant presentment for
adultery, the case was continued. In February, 1756, Elizabeth and Peter
Poythress, executors of Robert Poythress, deceased, who was assignee of
Judith Eldridge, executrix of Thomas Eldridge, deceased. plaintiffs against
Henry Meachum, executor of Edward Meacham, deceased, defendant by petition
for 38 shillings said to be due by Note of hand. This day came the parties
by their attorneys who being heard of and upon the premises and mature
deliberation thereupon had and the plaintiff producing the said Note for the
aforesaid sum of thirty eight shillings therefore it was considered that the
plaintiffs recover the same against the said defendant and his costs by him
in this behalf hands of the said Henry if so much thereof he hath in his
hands unadministered, if not, the cost was to be levied of his own proper
goods and chattles. Present was Thomas Vines, Gentleman.

Professional Life
In September, 1750, in Surry County, the court doth nominate and recommend
to the Honourable Thomas Lee, Esquire, President of His Majesty's Council
and Commander-in-Chief of this Dominion, the following persons as duly
qualified to be added to the Commission of the Peace for this County. To
wit: Benjamin Cocke, Robert Jones, Henry Browne, Richard Blow, Hartwell
Cocke, Peter Poythress, William Seward, Jr., Laurence Gibbins, John Irby,
John Mason, Jr., Edward Pettway, George Briggs and John Avent, Gentlemen,
and Augustine Claiborne was requested by the court to wait on his Honour,
the said President, with this recommendation and to request that all those
Gentlemen that refused to qualify themselves under the present Commission
may be yet continued in the Commission of the Peace for this County. Absent
was John Ruffin, Gentleman.
Before 1754, in the Prince George County records, a letter from Edmund
Pendleton, Speaker of the House, to the Sheriff, of Prince George County, to
elect someone to the House of Delegates in the place of Peter Poythress, who
has vacated his seat due to infirm state of health.
On June 29, 1767, an Act imposing duties on glass, paper, painters' colors
and tea imported into the American Colonies was enacted.
In the Session of March 31, 1768, the Burgesses from Prince George County
were Richard Bland and Peter Poythress (in place of BoIling, deceased).
On April 14, 1768, in the Virginia Gazette, Williamsburg, Captain Peter
Poythress was returned as a Burgess for Prince George county, in the stead
of Colonel Alexander Bolling, deceased.
In the Assembly of May, 1769, representing Prince George County were Richard
Bland and Peter Poythress. [There was but one session of this Assembly which
met on May 8, and was dissolved on May 17, 1769. On the 17th, the Governor,
Lord Botetourt said: "Mr. Speaker and Gentlemen of the House of Burgesses, I
have heard of your resolves and augur ill of their effects. You have made it
my duty to dissolve you, and you are dissolved accordingly."] On May 25,
1769, in the Virginia Gazette, Peter Poythress was listed as one of the
signers to The Virginia Association. [Peter Poythress' name is on the
Monument in Williamsburg and is found in the list of Burgesses, who in
Raleigh Tavern on May 18, 1769, May 27, 1774, and August, 1776, voted
against the importation and purchase of British Manufactures.]
In the Session of November 7, 1769, representing Prince George County were
Richard Bland and Peter Poythress. [Assembly of 1769-1771; this Assembly
first met on November 7, 1769, and afterwards by successive adjournments and
prorogations, on May 21, 1770, and July 11, 1771. On July 20 of the last
named year it was prorogued to the fourth Thursday in October, but by
proclamation of October 12, this Assembly was dissolved]. On March 5, 1770,
an Act for repealing all duties except on tea. On this same date, the Boston
massacre.
In the Session of May 21, 1770, the Burgesses from Prince George County were
Richard Bland and Peter Poythress.
On December 13, 1770, in the Virginia Gazette, the vestry of Martin's
Brandon parish, in the county of Prince George, have ordered the following
additional improvements to be made upon the glebe of the said parish, to
wit: a kitchen, 32 by 18 feet, with a outside brick chimnies; a stable, 24
by 16 feet; a barn, 40 by 20 feet; a dairy, and a smoke house each 12 feet
square; a necessary house, 8 feet square, all well framed, weather boarded
with plank, and shingled with cypress shingles, underpinned with brick, and
tarred; a garden 200 feet square, ----- with heart of poplar or
cypress ----, with -------------. The dwelling house, which is 4- by - feet,
to be repaired, and to be well painted, and the foot to be tarred; a room to
be added to it at each end, 14 by 18 feet, and a fire place in each room; a
handsome porch, on each side the dwelling house 10 by 8 feet, and a porch at
one end of the house. The additional buildings and porches to be underpinned
with brick, and strong steps to each porch; the covered way into the cellar
to be altered, and the whole work to be finished in a workmanlike manner.
Part of the value of the buildings to be paid at the time of letting them,
other part in July next, and the remainder upon the work being finished.
Whoever is willing to undertake the said work is desired to meet the
subscribers at the glebe, on Monday the 31st of December next, who are
expected by the vestry, to agree with workmen for the said improvements.
Signed by Richard Bland, Theodorick Bland, Peter Poythress and John
Poythress.
In the Session of July 11, 1771, from Prince George County were Richard
Bland and Peter Poythress. Assembly of 1772-1774 [This Assembly first met on
February 10, 1772, though the writs for election were dated October 31,
1771.
In the Session of February 10, 1772, representing Prince George County were
Richard Bland, and Peter Poythress. Assembly of 1772-1774 [This Assembly
first met on February 10, 1772, though the writs for election were dated
October 31, 1771. It assembled afterwards, by various prorogations, on March
4, 1773, and May 5, 1774].
On June 7, 1772, in Charles City County, the accounts of Thomas Moody,
deceased, 1753-1771. Lists money paid to Edward Minge (for reading), John
Brown, Edward Major, Poythress and Ealbank Store Account, etc.
On September 16, 1773, in Sussex County, administration in the account of
the estate of Captain Thomas Parham by Stith Parham, administrator, showed
payments to Dr. James Greenway, quit rent on 770 acres and 9 levies, John
Parham, Captain John McNabb's store account, Abram Parham, Richard Booker,
William Wynne, Hugh Belsches, Alexander Taylor, John Adams, estate of
Matthew Parham, Goodrich Haddin, Major Peter Poythress, Robert Tucker and
John Parham.
On December 16, 1773, the Boston tea party. On March 31, 1774, the Boston
"Port Bill" forbidding importations into Boston was enacted. On May 20,
1774, the Charter of Massachusetts was annulled, and the people were
declared rebels by the English Parliament. On September 5, 1774, the first
session of the Continental Congress met at Philadelphia.
At a Convention assembled March 20, 1775, representing Prince George County
were Richard Bland and Peter Poythress.
On April 1, 1775, in the Virginia Gazette, "Williamsburg, April 1, the whole
proceeds of the Convention of Delegates at the town of Richmond, in the
County of Henrico: At a meeting of the Delegates for the counties and
corporations in the colony of Virginia, at the town of Richmond, in the
county of Henrico, on Monday, the 20th of March, 1775. Present, a list of
delegates, among which, Richard Bland and Peter Poythress, Esquires, for
Prince George. [proceedings of the convention are recorded in column two].
"Resolved, that Richard Bland and Peter Poythress, Esquires, our late worthy
Representatives, be, and they are hereby nominated and appointed Deputies,
upon the Part of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of this County, to meet
such Deputies as shall be appointed by the other Counties and Corporations
within this Colony, in the City of Williamsburg, upon the first Day of
August next, or at any other Time or Place for the Purposes aforesaid."
On April 18, 1775, the legendary ride of Paul Revere from Boston to
Lexington. On April 19, 1775, the Battle of Lexington, Massachusetts, and
the Battle of Concord, Massachusetts. On April 21, 1775, the Massachusetts'
militia began the blockade of the roads that led into Boston. On May 10,
1775, the Second Continental Congress met.
In the Session of June 1, 1775, the Burgesses from Prince George County were
Richard Bland and Peter Poythress. For the Conventions of 1775 and 1776; in
the Convention assembled March 20, 1775, the Burgesses from Prince George
County were Richard Bland and Peter Poythress; in the Convention assemb1ed
July 17, 1775, the Burgesses from Prince George County were Richard Bland
and Peter Poythress; in the Convention assembled December 1, 1775, the
Burgesses from Prince George County were Richard Bland and Peter Poythress;
and, in the Convention assembled May 6, 1776, the Burgesses from Prince
George County were Richard Bland and Peter Poythress. Assembly of 1775-1776
[This Assembly was summoned to meet on August 11, 1774; but the assembly was
delayed by various prorogations and it did not actually convene until June
1, 1775. On June 24, it adjourned until October 12th when 37 members were
present; but as there was no quorum no business was transacted, and there
was another adjournment to the first Monday in March succeeding. On March 7,
1776, 32 members met, but there was again no quorum and they adjourned to
the first Monday in May next. On that day (May 6th), the journal records
that several members met, but did neither proceed to business or adjourn."
And below these words the clerk wrote in heavy lettering, " Finis," and
finally finished the record of the last of the Virginia Colonial
Legislatures with an elaborate cork-screw like tail piece. Therefore, there
was really only one session of this Assembly.]
On June 15, 1775, Washington was appointed Commander-in-Chief. On July 3,
1775, Washington took command of the army at Cambridge. On July 6, 1775,
Congress set forth the necessity of taking up arms. On October 26, 1775, the
Battle of Hampton, Virginia, was fought. On November 7, 1775, Lord Dunmore
proclaimed martial law in Virginia. On November 14, 1775, the Battle at
Kemp's Landing, Virginia, was fought.
At the Convention assembled December 1, 1775, representing Prince George
County were Richard Bland and Peter Poythress.
On December 9, 1775, the Battle of Great Bridge, Virginia, near Norfolk, was
fought. On January 1, 1776, the British bombarded and burned Norfolk,
Virginia.
On March 29, 1776, General Nathaniel Lee was given command south of the
Potomac. On April 5, 1776, Georgia voted for Independence.
On April 6, 1776, Congress decided that the commerce of the 13 colonies was
not under the purview of the King of England.
On April 19, 1776, in the Virginia Gazette, a list of Delegates chosen for
the following counties, viz: for Prince George County were Richard Bland and
Peter Poythress, Esquires. For the Convention assembled May 6, 1776,
representing Prince George County were Richard Bland and Peter Poythress.
On May 15, 1776, Virginia voted for Independence. On June 7, 1776, a
resolution was intoduced in Congress by Richard Henry Lee that "These united
colonies are, and of right ought to be free and independent States." On June
12, 1776, Virginia proclaimed the "right of man." On July 2, 1776, Congress
voted for Independence. On July 4, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was
first announced. On July 8 to 10, 1776, the engagement at Gwyn's Island,
Chesapeake Bay, Virginia, was fought. On July 9, 1776, General Washington
ordered that the Declaration of Independence be read to each brigade. On
July 22, 1776, the Congress authorized prisoner exchanges. On September 22,
1776, Nathan Hale was hanged in New York City. On December 25, 1776,
Washington crossed the Delaware to fight the Hessians at Trenton, New
Jersey. On December 26, 1776, the Battle of Trenton was fought. On December
29, 1776, Washington marched on Princeton. On June 14, 1777, the Stars and
Stripes were adopted as the new nation's flag. On September 1, 1777, the
Battle of Fort Henry, Wheeling, Virginia, was fought. On December 19, 1777,
General Washington's army went into winter quarters at Valley Forge,
Pennsylvania. On March 18, 1778, the Stamp Act was repealed. On May 15,
1778, Congress voted half-pay for 7 years for officers who served until the
end of the war. On May 9, 1779, the engagement at Fort Nelson (Portsmouth),
Virginia, was fought. On May 11, 1779, Norfolk, Virginia, was occupied by
the British.
In 1779, the U. S. Treasury offered to exchange new bills for presumably
counterfeit old paper money. Many Virginians made this exchange, in whole or
in part, to the Virginia Continental Loan office in 1779 and 1780. The
exchange could be for new money, applied to loans, or applied to taxes. The
records of exchangers and the amount exchanged provides a short proxy census
of Virginia in 1779:
Name County Entry # Amt. Deposited
Poythress, William Prince George 1019 $120
Poythress, Peter Prince George 1262 $311
Poythress, Joshua Prince George 1500 $484
Poythress, Thomas Brunswick 3765 $38
On August 11, 1779, Congress granted half-pay for life to officers that
served until the end of the war. On December 25, 1779, in the Virginia
Gazette, "a list of tobacco in Boyd's warehouse, which have been there
upwards of two years, and if not applied for will be sold according to law."
Among others, was Colonel Peter Poythress; 1041, 127, 914 [weights of bales
presumably].
From March 29 until May 12, 1780, the siege of Charleston, South Carolina.
On September 25, 1780, Benedict Arnold abandoned his post in the American
army and joined the British army. In December 1780, British Brigadier
General Benedict Arnold moved to Virginia with Colonel John Graves Simcoe,
with about 1,200 men. They arrived in Virginia on December 30, and attacked
Richmond, Virginia, on January 5, 1781. They burned Richmond. Their
destruction took place all along the James River and the Hampton Roads port
towns. On January 8, 1781, the engagement at Charles City Court House,
Virginia, was fought. On April 25, 1781, the Battle of Petersburg, Virginia,
was fought. On June 26, 1781, the engagement at Spencer's Tavern, Virginia,
was fought. On July 6, 1781, the engagements at Jamestown Ford, Virginia,
and at Green Spring, Virginia, were fought. On September 5, 1781, the naval
fight in the Chesapeake Bay between De Grasse and Graves was fought. On
September 30, 1781, the siege at Yorktown, Virginia, began. On October 19,
1781, Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, Virginia. On November 30, 1782,
the Treaty of Peace, signed at Paris, France, brought the war in America to
an end. On March 22, 1783, Congress granted officers full pay for five years
instead of the promised half-pay for life. On November 2, 1783, General
Washington made his farewell address and the American army was disbanded.
On January 9, 1787, in Prince George County, the estate of Robert Boyd,
deceased, in account with Charles Duncan, executor, 1779 through 1786.
Mentions, among many others, Peachy, Poythress, Bates and Co., Joshua
Poythress, Peter Poythress.
On September 17, 1787, the United States' Constitution was adopted by the
Constitutional Convention.
Death of Peter Poythress on December 19, 1787.
On August 6, 1790, Congress granted pensions to individuals disabled by
wounds during the revolutionary war.

Civic Activities
In May, 1750, in the Surry County court, Hunter versus Cully, a case in
trespass, assault and battery. Peter Poythress, among others, was on the
jury, which found for the plaintiff. The jury was also to enquire of the
damages. Damages were at £0/24/11.
On May 15, 1750, the inventory of the estate of Mr. John Rives was ordered.
Sarah Rives was the Administratrix. Edward Pettway, Peter Poythress and
Henry Mitchell were the appraisers for the estate. On May 16, 1750, in the
Surry County court, it was ordered that Peter Poythress, Henry Mitchell and
Edward Petway, or any three of them, being first sworn before a Justice of
the Peace do appraise in current money the slaves and personal estate of
John Reeves, deceased, and return the appraisement to the next court. On
June 19, 1750, in the Surry County court, the inventory of the estate of Mr.
John Rives. Sarah Rives was the Administratrix. Edward Pettway, Peter
Poythress and Henry Mitchell were the appraisers.
In May, 1750, in the Surry County court, Thrower versus Whittington, in
trespass. Peter Poythress, among others, was on the jury. The plaintiff was
reprimanded for "false clamour" and the defendant was to recover court costs
from the plaintiff.
On August 21, 1751, in the Surry County court, the account of the estate of
Richard Lewis, deceased, lists, among others, Major Poythress.
In August, 1766, Peter Poythress and John Poythress, Gentlemen, greeting.
Peter Leath, by his deed of August, 1766, sold to Peter Randolph Bland, of
Prince George County, 400 acres, in Amelia County, on Leath's Creek. Eliza.,
the wife of Peter Leath cannot conveniently travel to our county to make
acknowledgement of the deed. You are therefore authorized to go to Eliz. to
receive her acknowledgment. Signed on June 9, in the 7th year of our reign,
T. G. Peachy. Eliza. Leath relinquished her right of dower to the conveyed
lands. Signed by Peter Poythress and John Poythress.

Property: Land
On August 5, 1751, in Prince George County, Peter Poythress, 324 acres, on
the south side of Butterwood Swamp, adjoining William Poythress, &c.
On July 7, 1763, in Amelia County, to Peter Poythress, 178 acres, on the
Nottoway River and the Hurricane Swamp.
On June 24, 1767, William Manire, of Amelia County, sold to Peter Poythress,
of Prince George County, 50 acres, in Amelia County, bounded by Poythress'
corner on the Nottoway River, Wolf Pit Branch. The witnesses, John Manire,
William Manire, Jr., and George Connally.
On November 12, Peter Poythress, of Branchester, Martin's Brandon parish, in
Prince George County, sold to John Bland, of the same the parish and county,
128 acres, in Amelia County, commonly called and known by the name of
Hariane Quarter, except the water mill and 2 acres adjacent thereto on the
Nottaway River. The witnesses were John Ruffin, Jr., Jerman Baker and T. G.
Peachy.
On November 23, 1771, Peter Poythress, of Prince George County, bought 6
acres, in Brunswick County, from John Morton, Jr., of Brunswick County, on
the Nottaway River, and bounded (detailed description of the location of the
land).
On March 24, 1774, Peter Poythress, of Prince George County, sold to
Christopher Haskins, of Brunswick County, 6 acres of land, on the Nottoway
River, in Brunswick County, bounded (routine text describing boundaries in
detail). The witnesses were William Jones, Benjamin Jones, Robert Burlington
and Deely Mathis.
On January 7, 1775, in Sussex County, William Parham, of Albemarle parish,
in Sussex County, sold to Peter Poythress, of Martin's Brandon parish, in
Prince George County, 198 acres, bounded by the Indian Swamp, John Smith,
the Leather Coats Branch, John Pettway and Peter Poythress.
On December 19, 1776, in Sussex County, Matthew Parham, Jr., of Sussex
County, sold to Peter Poythress, of Martin's Brandon parish, in Prince
George County, 133 acres, on the north side of the Nottoway River and
bounded by the Gum Swamp, the Indian Swamp, James Parham, Cherry Island
Swamp and Stith Parham. The witness was William Parham.
In 1778, in the Dinwiddie County Surveyor's Platt Book, Peter Poythress,
Esquire, of Prince George County, 13 acres, in Bath parish, on the south
side of Butterwood Creek, adjoining Peter Wynne.
On May 29, 1780, grant to Peter Poythress by Thomas Jefferson, Governor of
the Commonwealth, for a tract of land by survey bearing date November 24,
1779, nearly 13 acres lying in Bath parish, in Dinwiddie County, on the
south side of Butterwood Creek, adjoining Peter Wynne and Polly Poythress.
On June 20, 1780, grant to Peter Poythress by the Governor, 173 acres,
survey made November 21, 1774, and lying in Prince George County, on the
south side of Blackwater Swamp, adjoining Edward Marks, William Grammer, &c.
In 1782, in Prince George County, land taxes were paid by Peter Poythress,
on (1,250, 400, 225, 100, 3 lots in town of Blandford =) 1,975+ acres.
In 1782, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by Colonel Peter
Poythress, on (Butterwood, 1,000 acres adjoining Cryer + 324 acres, Tommy
Hilton(?) + 404 acres =) 1,728 acres.
In 1783, in Prince George County, land taxes were paid by Peter Poythress,
on (1,250 + 400 + 225 + 100 =) 1,975 acres.
On March 5, 1783, John Randolph, of Chesterfield County, to Peter Poythress,
of Prince George County, tract known as Bloomsbury, 1,000 acres, in Prince
George County. Not recorded until November 14, 1820. Was first offered for
recording during July Court, 1783, but was proven by only two of three
witnesses at that time.
In 1786, in Prince George County, land taxes were paid by Peter Poythress,
on (1,250 + 1,000 + 400 + 226 + 100 + 100 + 10½, + 3 lots in Blandford =)
3,086½+ acres.
In 1787, in Prince George County, land taxes were paid by Peter Poythress,
on (1,250 + 1,000 + 400 + 225 + 100 + 100 + 10½ + 3 lots in Blandford =)
3,085½+ acres.
In 1787, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by Colonel Peter
Poythress, on (Butterwood, 1,000 acres + 324 acres + 404 acres =) 1,728
acres.
In 1788, in Prince George County, land taxes were paid by the estate of
Peter Poythress, on (1,250 + 1,000 + 400 + 225 + 100 + 100 =) 3,075 acres.
In 1788, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on (Butterwood, 1,000 acres + 324 acres + 404 acres =)
1,728 acres.
In 1789, in Prince George County, land taxes were paid by the estate of
Peter Poythress, on (1,000 + 400 + 290 + 225 + 100 + 100 =) 2,115 acres, 960
acres less than in 1788.
In 1789, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on (Butterwood, 1,000 acres + 324 acres + 404 acres =)
1,728 acres.
In 1790, in Prince George County, land taxes were paid by the estate of
Peter Poythress, on 1,000, 400, 290, 225, 100, 100 = 2,115 acres.
In 1791, in Prince George County, land taxes were paid by the estate of
Peter Poythress, on (1,000 + 400 + 225 + 100 + 100 =) 1,825 acres; 290 acres
less than in 1790.
In 1791, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on (Butterwood, 1,000 acres + 324 acres + 404 acres =)
1,728 acres.
In 1792, in Prince George County, land taxes were paid by the estate of
Peter Poythress, on (905 + 400 + 225 + 100 + 100 =) 1,730 acres; 95 acres
less than in 1791.
In 1792, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on (Butterwood, 1,000 acres + 324 acres + 404 acres =)
1,728 acres.
In 1793, in Prince George County, land taxes were paid by the estate of
Peter Poythress, on (900 + 400 + 225 + 100 + 100 =) 1,725 acres.
In 1793, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on (Butterwood, 1,000 acres + 404 acres =) 1,404 acres.
In 1794, in Prince George County, land taxes were paid by the estate of
Peter Poythress, on (900 + 400 + 225 + 100 + 100 =) 1,725 acres.
In 1794, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on (Butterwood, 1,000 acres + 404 acres =) 1,404 acres.
In 1795, in Prince George County, land taxes were paid by the estate of
Peter Poythress, on (905 + 400 + 225 + 100 + 110 =) 1,740 acres.
In 1795, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on (Butterwood, 1,000 acres + 404 acres =) 1,404 acres; and
by Francis Poythress, on 100 acres, (conveyed by William Cross).
In 1796, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on Butterwood, 1,000 acres; and by Francis Poythress, on
100 acres.
In 1797, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on Butterwood, 1,000 acres; and by Francis Poythress, on
100 acres.
In 1798, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on Butterwood, 1,000 acres; and by Francis Poythress, on
100 acres.
In 1801, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on Butterwood, 1,000 acres; and by Francis Poythress, on
100 acres.
In 1802, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on Butterwood, 1,000 acres; and by Francis Poythress, on
100 acres.
In 1803, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on Butterwood, 1,000 acres; and by Francis Poythress, on
100 acres.
In 1805, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on Butterwood, 1,000 acres; and by Francis Poythress, on
100 acres.
In 1806, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on Butterwood, 1,000 acres; and by Francis Poythress, on
100 acres.
In 1807, in Dinwiddie County, land taxes were paid by the estate of Colonel
Peter Poythress, on Butterwood, 1,000 acres; and by Francis Poythress, on
100 acres.

Adjoining property
On July 25, 1746, to Going Johnson, 300 acres, in Prince George County,
between Butterwood and Tommahitton Swamps, adjoining Wright, Fisher,
Poythress and Glover.
On August 19, 1748, in Surry County, Peter Dobie sold to William Dobie, 150
acres, on the north side of the Nottoway River. The witness was Peter
Poythress.
On April 21, 1762, Charles Connally, of Nottoway parish, in Amelia County,
sold to Robert Williams, of the same, all that tract of land, in Nottoway
parish, in Amelia County, containing 200 acres of land lying between
Poythress...
On February 16, 1764, in Sussex County, Thomas Heath and wife, Sarah Heath,
sold to William Parham, 198 acres, bounded by the east side of the Indian
Swamp, John Smith in Leathercoat Branch and Poythress. Sarah Leath
relinquished her Right of Dower. The witnesses, Edward Pettway, John Raines
and John Leath, the Elder.
On May 21, 1764, Robert Williams and Mary, his wife, of St. Andrew's parish,
in Brunswick County, sold to Dibdale Holt, of Nottoway parish, in Amelia
County, 200 acres, in Nottoway parish, in Amelia County, and bounded by
Peter Poythress.
On June 21, 1764, in Sussex County, Edward Pettway, to his son, John
Pettway, for love and affection, 200 acres, bounded by Thomas Heath on Peter
Poythress' line, the Trading Branch, James Heath, Daniel Epps, John Smith
and the Leathercoat Branch. The witnesses, Michael Bailey and Edward
Pettway.
On May 18, 1767, Phillip Stone, of Dobbs County, North Carolina, sold to
William Manire, of Amelia County, a certain tract of land, in Amelia County,
and bounded by the Nottoway River, Poythress, Dibdalls Holt, etc.
On March 18, 1768, William Manere, of Amelia County, sold to Joseph Harper,
Jr., of Dinwiddie County, 170 acres, in Amelia County, bounded by the County
line, Daniel's Branch, Poythress.
On November 17, 1768, in Sussex County, Joel Tucker and wife, Judith Tucker,
sold to John Walker, 200 acres, bounded by the north side of the Nottaway
River and adjoining said Tucker, the Gally Swamp and Poythress. Judith
Tucker relinquished her Right of Dower.
On March 15, 1769, in Sussex County, John Jackson, planter, of Albemarle
parish, to his son Robert Jackson, for love and affection, 730 acres, on the
north side of the Nottoway River being the land whereon John Jackson lived
and bounded by the Galley Swamp, Peter Poythress, John Walker, Joel Tucker,
William Broadnax, John Echols, the main road leading to Cabin Point, James
Robinson and Monks Neck Creek. The witnesses, John Walker, Joel Tucker and
William Wilkerson and John Jackson.
On January 29, 1772, in Sussex County, John Walker and wife, Hanna Walker,
of Sussex County, sold to William Broadnax, of Dinwiddie County, 200 acres,
on the Nottaway River and bounded by Joel Tucker, the Galley Swamp and Major
Peter Poythress.
On August 15, 1772, in Dinwiddie County, Buffington Darwell, 32 acres, in
Bath parish, on the south side of Butterwood Creek, adjoining Peter
Poythress and Glover.

As Witness
On March 27, 1783, in Mecklenburg County, Roger Atkinson, of Dinwiddie
County, to John Ogburn, of Brunswick County. The witnesses were Joseph
Jones, Peter Poythress, Charles Cabaness and John Atkinson.

Family Estates
June 17, 1769, in Chesterfield County, the Will of Henry Randolph, deceased.
I give to my son, John Randolph, 1,000 acres called "Plantation" on which I
lived.
I give to William Randolph, land called Rich Neck.
I give to my sons, Peter Randolph and Thomas Randolph, all of my lands, in
Amelia County, equally.
I give to my son, Robert Randolph, £500.
I give to my son Richard Randolph £500.
I give to all my children my personal property and slaves equally. I direct
that my unmarried children shall be maintained out of the profits of the
estate.
My executrix, my wife. Executors, Major Peter Poythress, John Gilliam, Sr.,
and John Gilliam, Jr.
The witnesses were Henry Featherstone, William Dyson and John Ratcliffe.
Tabitha Poythress Randolph (1725-1805), the daughter of Robert and Elizabeth
Poythress, married Henry Randolph (1720/1-1771), the son of Henry Randolph
and Elizabeth Epes. Major Peter Poythress (1733-1787), was the son of Robert
Poythress, and brother of Tabitha Poythress Randolph.

On August 11, 1774, in the Virginia Gazette, "to be rented for a terms of
years, a valuable Plantation in Prince George County, about four miles from
Blandford, containing 500 acres, upon which is a good dwelling-house, all
the necessary outhouses, barns, orchards, &c. being the place whereon Mr.
William Poythress, deceased, lately lived. For terms apply to Major Peter
Poythress, near the premises."
On July 4, 1777, in the Virginia Gazette, Branchester, June 23, 1777. "Those
who have just claims against the estate of William Poythress, late of Prince
George County, deceased, are desired to apply immediately for payment as I
intend to deliver up the estate in a short time." Peter Poythress, executor.
On July 18, 1777, in the Virginia Gazette. William Poythress, late of Prince
George County, deceased, estate accounts with his executor Peter Poythress,
of Branchester.

In Prince George County, the Will of John Morrison, husband of Ann Poythress
Morrison, daughter of Richard Bland, dated April 19, 1785, proved August 10,
1790.
To wife, Ann Poythress Morrison, my whole estate for life, if child the wife
is carrying lives, then child to get estate at wife's death. If child does
not live to age 21, then my five sisters to get all of the estate at wife's
death.
To brother, Alexander, after the death of my wife or child, my plantations
in Brunswick County, Virginia, and Warren County, North Carolina, if he
gives my brother, Theodorick, a share in the plantation my father bought
from Ravenscroft.
My executors, my wife, Ann, her father, Richard Bland, Esquire, and my
brother, David Morrison. No witnesses. Proved by the oaths of Edmund Ruffin,
Jr., George Ruffin, and John Batte. Ann Poythress Bland (1765-) was the
daughter of Richard Bland (1731-1786) and Mary Blair Bolling (1744-) and
granddaughter of Richard Bland and Anne Poythress.

February 30, 1787, in Prince George County, the settlement of the estate of
Alexander Robertson. [Note: this is a very complex document with numerous
columns, headings and subheadings]. Sums due to various persons, among
others.
Cash to John Poythress.
Cash to Joshua Poythress.
To Ann Poythress Morrison, £545, 12 slaves, several houses, plantation
items. June, 1783 (date written?).
The witnesses were Joshua Poythress, Richard Bland and Elizabeth Blair
Bland. Richard Bland (1762-1806) was married to Susanna Poythress
(1769-1839), the daughter of Peter Poythress and Elizabeth Bland.

Peter Poythress' Will
The Will of Peter Poythress, dated October, 6, 1785, was probated in
January, 1786. It named his wife, Elizabeth, his daughters, Elizabeth, wife
of William Mayo, Anne Randolph, Mary Batte, Agnes, Lucy Bland Poythress, and
Sally Lee. It left all of his real property, except some lots in the town of
Blandford, to his son, William, who was not 21.

On July 26, 1790, in Prince George County, Articles of Agreement, between
William Poythress and Thomas Harris. William Poythress has claimed an
interest in a tract of land where the said Thomas Harris lived and the said
William Poythress and Thomas Harris being willing to settle the affair and
affix the right title. John Harris gave William Poythress title to a house
sold by William Poythress to Robert Birchett. House and land had been willed
to William Poythress by Peter Poythress that was sold unto Walter Munnery
and Nathanial Tatum. Signed by William Poythress. The witnesses were Edward
Marks, Nathaniel Mackay and Boswell Becking.
On August 15, 1790, in Prince George County, John Baird and Charles Duncan,
executors of the last Will and testament of Robert Boyd of the first part
and William Mayo, executor, of the last Will and testament of Peter
Poythress, and Elizabeth, the widow of the said Peter Poythress, of the
second part, and James Cureton, of Prince George County, of the third part.
(Walter Boyd wills use of his house and lands in Blandford to his wife and
after her death she should leave it to his brother, Robert Boyd, and his
heirs forever. Shortly after the death of Walter Boyd, his widow quitted the
house and surrendered it to Robert Boyd. Robert, in his last Will and
testament authorized his executors...whereupon the said (John) Baird and
(Charles) Duncan sold to Peter Poythress. Peter, in his last Will and
testament devised to his son-in-law, William Mayo, with consent of
Elizabeth, his wife. Whereupon, the said William Mayo with approval of
Peter's widow, Elizabeth, sold the houses and land, bounded by the
Appomattox River, Thomas Gordon's corner, the Creek, Richard Taylor, and
included 2 lots, #34 and #47, in the whole, 15 acres, to James Cureton, for
£900 current money of Virginia. Signed by John Baird, deceased, executors
Charles Duncan, William Mayo and Elizabeth Poythress. The witnesses were
John Thweatt for William Mayo; John Batte as to William Mayo, Edmund Hanson
for Baird and Duncan, Jos. Weisiger for Baird and Duncan, John Baird, Jr.,
for estate and Baird and Duncan, Jos. Weisiger for Mrs. Elizabeth Poythress,
John Baird for Mrs. Elizabeth Poythress, Robert Stuart for Mrs. Elizabeth
Poythress.
On February 25, 1791, in Prince George County, William Poythress, of Prince
George County, son of Peter Poythress, late of said county (deceased) to
Christopher McConnice, of the Town of Petersburg, a parcel of land lying in
Petersburg heretofore called Blandford and distinguished on the plot or plan
of the town as lot #52. Also, all the low grounds, on the Appomattox River,
lying between lot #52 and lot #53, to the boundary lines of lot #54, to
Donald and Frazer, Merchants, in the town. The witnesses, George Marable,
Thomas Gardinor and Hamilton Burge. On February 15, 1791, in Prince George
County, the Commonwealth of Virginia to Peter Epes and Pleasant Cocke,
whereas, William Poythress, son of Peter Poythress, deceased, to Christopher
McConnice, land and house in Blandford Town of Petersburg, William
Poythress, by the death of his father, Peter, to whom he was heir-at-law,
the above (Epes and Cocke) were instructed to determine if Elizabeth
Poythress, wife of Peter, surrendered her dower rights.
On August 15, 1791, in Prince George County, James Cureton and Betsy, his
wife, to John Baird, of Prince George County, Merchant, for £900, a lot in
Blandford of 15 acres, being the same lot which said John Baird and Charles
Duncan as executors of Robert Boyd, deceased, with assent of William Mayo,
executor of Peter Poythress, deceased, and Elizabeth Poythress, widow and
relict of said Peter, conveyed to James Cureton. The witnesses were Luke
Wheeler, William Poythress, Jr., and Joseph Weisiger.
In September, 1791, in Prince George County, Elizabeth Poythress to
(remainder of document illegible).
On October 11, 1791, in Prince George County, John Baird and Charles Duncan
and William Mayo, and Elizabeth Poythress and James Cureton. (Court confirms
above dated 15 Aug 1790).

After Peter Poythress' Death
In June, 1794, in Chesterfield County, Tabitha Randolph, of Chesterfield
County, daughter of Robert Poythress, late of Prince George County,
deceased, a deed to Henry Archer [son-in-law], of Chesterfield County, for
£100, 1/5th interest in 8 negroes and their increase devised by her father,
Robert Poythress, of Prince George County, in his Will dated May 24, 1743,
in which Will said Robert Poythress provided that his wife should have a
life interest in the said negroes and their increase should be equally
divided between the three sons of the said Robert Poythress, viz. Robert,
Peter and William Poythress, and such of the testators daughters as were
married at the time of their mother's death. The said Tabitha being married
at the time of her mother's death conveys this interest. In 1794, in
Chesterfield County, Tabitha Randolph, one of the daughters and legatees of
Robert Poythress, deceased, versus William Mayo, acting executor of Peter
Poythress, deceased. The court ordered the commissioners to set aside to
said plaintiff certain negroes out of the estate of Robert Poythress,
deceased, with the increase since his death, and also estimate hire from the
death of said Peter Poythress, and make report to this court. Summary Bill
of Complaint. Elizabeth Poythress possessed herself of 12 slaves according
to the will of Robert Poythress. She died many years after her husband,
surviving her sons, Robert and William. The slaves then devolved to their
brother, Peter. Until her death, Elizabeth Poythress lived with or near said
Peter and he had management of her affairs. He was entitled to 3/5 of the
slaves at her death in behalf of himself and his two deceased brothers,
William and Robert. At that time, only 2 of the testator's daughters were
unmarried, the oratrix, Tabitha Randolph, and her sister, Elizabeth Gilliam.
Peter continued to keep under his care the 8 negroes of which he was 3/5
owner. He died a few years past. William Mayo, Esquire, was the acting
executor of the said Peter Poythress and continued to hold possession of the
said 8 slaves, though often requested to give the oratrix her share. She
desired an accounting of the 8 slaves and their issue and sex be given, then
her 1/5 of said slaves and 1/5 of labor since the death of said Peter
Poythress to be allotted to her.

Peter Poythress' name is on the Monument in Williamsburg and is found in the
list of Burgesses, who in Raleigh Tavern on May 18, 1769, May 27, 1774, and
August, 1776, voted against the importation and purchase of British
Manufactures.

At the site of the old Capitol today stands a monument commemorating events
which transpired there leading up to the Revolutionary War. On the back of
the monument is the following inscription: Members of the House of Burgesses
who, at the Raleigh Tavern, May 18, 1769, and May 27, 1774, and August,
1774, entered into associations against the importation or purchase of
British manufactures: Peyton Randolph, Speaker; Robert Carter Nicholas,
Treasurer; Philip Ludwell Grymes, Nathaniel Edwards, Jr., William Cabell,
Jr., George Washington, Wilson Miles Cary, Richard Henry Lee, Robert
Rutherford, Patrick Henry, Thomas Nelson, Jr., William Macon, Jr., Josesph
Hutchings, Thomas Parramore, Cornelius Thomas, Thomas Claiborne, Richard
Anderson, Thomas Jefferson, James Scott, Jr., Nathaniel Terry, Nurwell
Bassett, William Clayton, Thomas Glascock, Benjamin Howard, Alexander Trent,
Paul Carrington, Southey Simpson, Peter Poythress, James Hamilton, Willis
Riddick, Foushee Tebbs, Edward Osborne, Frances Peyton, Robert Munford,
Bolling Starke, Robert Bolling, Thomas Barbar, William Acrill, Hartwell
Cocke, John Harmanson, Archibald Carey, Charles Carter, Carter Braxton,
Peter Johnson, Thomas Whiting, John Alexander, John Blair, Jr., Thomas
Johnson, Richard Starke, John Lewis, Jr., Charles Lynch, Thomas Bayley,
Lewis Burwell, Richard Baker, Joseph Cabell, Thomas Walker, William Roane,
John Donelson, James Bridger, Gabriel Jones, Richard Bland, Edward Hacke
Mosely, Jr., Thomson Mason, James Walker, Thomas Scott, John Woodson,
Abraham Hite, Henry Taylor, Severn Eyre, George Ball, John Wilson, David
Mason, Hugh Inness, John Talbot, Richard Lee, John Ackiss, John Green, Isaac
Read, James Wood, Edwin Gray, David Meade, Henry Lee, John Mayo, Robert
Wormeley Carter, Bartholomew Dandridge, Francis Lightfoot Lee, Nicholas
Faulcon, Jr., Benjamin Harrison, Francis Slaughter, William Langhorne,
Thomas Newton, Jr., Richard Mitchell, Worlich Westwood, James Taylor, Jr.,
Benjamin Watkins, Edmund Pendleton, William Harwood, Henry Pendleton,
William Fleming, Samuel McDowell, James Edmundson, Mathew Marable, Edmund
Berkeley, James Montague, John Hite, Jr., John Banister, Mann Page, Jr.,
Lewis Burwell (Gloucester), Richard Adams, Rodham Kenner, Thomas Pettus,
Richard Hardy, Peter Le Grand, William Aylett, John Bowdoin, Joseph Nevil,
Samuel Duval, John Burt, John Bowyer, Charles Coles, Henry Field, John
Walker, James Holt, Isaac Zane, Henry Bell, Henry King, John West, John
Lynn, John Winn, George Stubblefield, Christopher Wright, Thomas Mann
Randolph, William Fitzhugh, Thomas Marshall, James Mercer, George Brooke,
Allen Cocke, Peter Presley Thornton, Samuel Riddick, Dudley Digges.

Will of the Widow
On April 12, 1787, in Prince George County, the Will of Elizabeth Poythress,
of Prince George County, widow of Peter Poythress (deceased as well). In
consideration of natural affection for daughter, Sally Lee, and "to prevent
any dispute which may happen in the construction of my husband's Will
respecting the devise in the said Will of Kate's daughter, "Fanny," to my
said daughter, Sally Lee," "which was in said Will devised to me," I give my
said daughter, Sally Lee, the said negro, Fanny, and her children, Becky,
Betty and Kate and their increase" "my hand and seal the ___ day of ____,
1787. Signed by Elizabeth Poythress. The witnesses were John Batte, Tabitha
Randolph and William Bingham. On April 14, 1787, at a court held this date
for Prince George County, this foregoing deed from Elizabeth Poythress to
her daughter Sally Lee was proved by the oaths of John Batte and William
Bingham. Sally Bland Poythress Lee (1768-1828) was the daughter of Peter
Poythress and Elizabeth Bland. Sally married Squire Richard Lee (1727-1795).
Tabitha Poythress Randolph (1725-1805), Peter Poythress' sister, was one of
the witnesses. John Batte (1757-1816), a son-in-law of Peter Poythress, was
married to Mary Poythress (1762-1815), and was also a witness.



This thread: