RIGENWEB-L Archives

Archiver > RIGENWEB > 2006-03 > 1142469753


From: "Suzanne Hough" <>
Subject: Re: [RIGENWEB] Pollock Murder -- The Scoop
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2006 18:42:33 -0600
References: <44180D61.000016.02456@BUNNYTAILS> <6.2.1.2.0.20060315184940.020d47d0@spamarrest.com>


Margaret: Thank you so very much for finding these sources. Amazing story!
I was surprised to learn that Marvel filed for a divorce. I have had
much trouble finding info on her. My material states she was fna Marvel
Perkins.
Sincerely,
Suzanne Pollock Hough

----- Original Message -----
From: "M. E. Potter" <>
To: <>
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2006 5:50 PM
Subject: Re: [RIGENWEB] Pollock Murder -- The Scoop


> Hi Jean,
>
> All of the following are from the same source, "Early American Newspapers,
> Series I, 1690 to 1876" available to members on the NEHGS website.
>
> First, the following popped up (in case you don't already know this):
>
> From the Rhode-Island Republican, Vol.. 13, Iss. 27, pg. 4, 1821-10-03:
>
> "WASHINGTON, ss. -- Supreme Judicial Court / October term, A. D. 1820. /
> WHEREAS Marvel Pollock of Exeter, in the county of Washington, wife of
> Jeremiah W. Pollock, now residing in parts unknown, has this day filed her
> petition, in my Office, praying, for certain reasons therein stated, that
> the bonds of matrimony subsisting between her and the said Jeremiah, may
> be dissolved. Notice is hereby given to the said Jeremiah, to be and
> appear, if he see fit, before the Honorable Supreme Judicial Court to be
> holden, at South-Kingstown, within and for the county of Washington, on
> the second Monday of October, 1821, to shew [sic] cause why the prayer of
> said petition, ought not to be granted. / JOHN SEGAR, Clerk. / South
> Kingstown, Aug. 18, 1821 [S.12]"
>
> [If you don't already have the divorce papers, you can get them, free of
> charge, by emailing <> ]
>
>
> From the Norwich Courier, Vol. III, Iss. 42, pg. 3, 1825-01-19: "Trial
> for Murder. -- On Wednesday last, came on the trial of Adonijah Bailey,
> aged 80 years, for the murder of Jeremiah W. Pollock, at the Superior
> Court, holden at Brooklyn -- Judges Peters and Brainard presiding. The
> jury retired about 20 minutes, and returned with a verdict of GUILTY. / We
> understand that the counsel for the prisoner have in arrest of judgment on
> the ground of one of the jurors not being a freeholder, and petitioned for
> a new trial on account of the misdirection of the Judge."
>
>
> From the Middlesex Gazette, Vol. XL, Iss. 2044 , pg. 2, 1825-01-26:
> "DOMESTIC. / On Wednesday last, the trial of Adonijah Baily [sic] for the
> murder of Jeremiah W. Pollock, commenced at Brooklyn, in the county of
> Windham, and terminated on Friday evening. So much interest had been
> excited, that before the trial commenced, the town was thronged with
> people from all parts of the County. The Hon. Judge PETERS presided at the
> trial. When Bailey was brought in to plead, great anxiety was manifested
> to witness the solemn scene. The prisoner was brought in by the Sheriff
> and his deputies, and as he approached the bar of justice, at the age of
> 79, halting with infirmity, every soul present seemed deeply affected,
> exoept [sic] the prisoner, who though attentive was unmoved. The case was
> conducted on the part of the State, by Col. JUDSON, State Attorney,
> assisted by Wm. P. CLEAVELAND, Esq.; and on the part of the prisoner by C.
> GODDARD, and J. EATON, Esquires. / The testimony disclosed the most cruel
> and awful murder that has taken place in the State of Connecticut for many
> years. The substance of the testimony was as follows: -- / Pollock had for
> some weeks been at work at Baileys, in the town of Sterling, and on the
> 23d of Oct. last, Pollock was missing: search was made from day to day for
> the body, until Nov. 3d when it was found buried, one foot deep, eight
> rods from the place where Bailey and Pollock had been at work. On taking
> the body from the ground, it appeared that four wounds were made on the
> back part of the head, cut through the scull [sic] with an axe. Eight
> witnesses testified that Bailey said he was with Pollock, making shingles
> until 11 o'clock on the 23d of Oct. when Pollock went away, to go to a
> neighbouring store, and that he, Bailey, stayed to work till late dinner
> time, and immediately returned and continued work there all day. Traces of
> blood were discovered from the shingle place, to the place where the body
> was found, and a fire had been kindled with a view to burn up the bloody
> shavings, but many were found partly consumed and others covered up, all
> this within 30 rods of Bailey's house. Bailey was asked whether there was
> any fire on the spot on the day Pollock was missing, repeatedly said there
> was none, could not have been any, as he was in a situation to know, being
> there all the time. It was then proved beyond all doubt that a fire was
> seen to be kindled around the shingle place about 2 o'clock P. M. which
> remained to burn some time. On searching Bailey, a note and order
> belonging to Pollock were found in his possession. Pollock's trunk was
> found open, and all its contents taken out, and some papers belonging to
> Pollock were thrown into the fire, and identified, some of them were taken
> off by a witness before consumed. When Pollock was last seen he had money
> with him and Bailey was destitute of any, until after Pollock's death,
> when he passed money at the store, to a considerable amount. Pollock's
> pocket-book and watch have never been found. One witness swore that about
> 10 days before Pollock was murdered, Bailey said 'that he or Pollock
> should die soon.' After Bailey's arrest and while under the care of the
> officer he tried to bribe his keepers and get away from them. -- These
> together with many other circumstances rendered his case entirely
> hopeless. After a protracted trial of three days, the cause was committed
> to the Jury, who returned a verdict of GUILTY. / The next day the prisoner
> was set at the bar to receive sentence, and being asked whether he had any
> reasons why sentence of death should not be pronounced, the prisoner
> replied with perfect coolness, that 'he had none, for he was willing to
> submit to the law.' / Judge Peters then proceeded in a most solemn and
> impressive manner to conclude the scene. The sentence was pronounced, and
> the execution is to take place the 2d Wednesday of June next. -- N. L.
> Advocate."
>
> From the Rhode Island American, Vol. XVII, Iss. 35, pg. 2, 1825-01-28:
> "At a recent term of the Supreme Court of Connecticut in Windham county,
> Adonijah Bailey, aged eighty years, was convicted of the murder of
> Jeremiah W. Pollock, and sentenced to be executed on the 8th of June next.
> It is stated that the testimony disclosed the most cruel and awful murder
> that has been committed in Connecticut for many years."
>
> From the Middlesex Gazette, Vol. XL, Iss. 2062, pg. 3, 1825-06-01: "On
> the night of the 24th inst. Adonijah Bailey who was sentenced to be
> executed on the 8th day of June next, for the murder of Jeremiah W.
> Pollock, evaded the sentence of the Judge by hanging himself, during the
> silence of the night in the dreary mansion of the Goal [sic], without any
> one to assist him. He made his rope of bandages which he took from his
> sore leg, and attached one end of it by a nail to the hinge of the door,
> and the other part of the rope round his neck, he was found hanging with
> his knees nearly to the floor, when the Goaler [sic] entered his room in
> the morning, the body was interred on Thursday. / Since his death we
> understand the Gaoler has found many papers in the room where he was
> confined which contain his confession of many black crimes, and among
> which, is the murder of Jeremiah W. Pollock, he has confessed how and in
> what manner he committed the bloody deed but not the cause, all of which
> will soon appear in a pamphlet containing also his trial. -- Brooklyn
> Obser."
>
>
> Perhaps you can track down that pamphlet, if it was ever actually
> published. Maybe a local historical society would have a copy.
>
> Regards,
> Margaret
>
>
>
> At 07:49 AM 3/15/2006, you wrote:
>>Hi Gang,
>>Here is another murder nightmare that I have in my genealogy. Maybe one
>>of
>>you that have all this access to these great books can find something.
>>I certainly would appreciate it...
>>Jeremiah Wilson Pollock is my 5th gr grandfather..B 1769 Wakefield...died
>>23
>>Oct 1824 Sterling, CT
>>Per Arnold...Jeremiah Wilson Pollock was a postal carrier and Whig
>>Also he was murdered in Sterling, Ct. as was his brother 2 months prior.
>>Wonder if the murders are related.
>>
>>Sincerely, Jean B
>>
>>
>>==== RIGENWEB Mailing List ====
>>The RI Archives http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/ri/rifiles.htm
>>RIGenWeb Archives Search http://www.rootsweb.com/usgenweb/ri/risearch.html
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> At 07:49 AM 3/15/2006, you wrote:
>>Hi Gang,
>>Here is another murder nightmare that I have in my genealogy. Maybe one
>>of
>>you that have all this access to these great books can find something.
>>I certainly would appreciate it...
>>Jeremiah Wilson Pollock is my 5th gr grandfather..B 1769 Wakefield...died
>>23
>>Oct 1824 Sterling, CT
>>Per Arnold...Jeremiah Wilson Pollock was a postal carrier and Whig
>>Also he was murdered in Sterling, Ct. as was his brother 2 months prior.
>>Wonder if the murders are related.
>>
>>Sincerely, Jean B
>>
>>
>>==== RIGENWEB Mailing List ====
>>The RI Archives http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/ri/rifiles.htm
>>RIGenWeb Archives Search http://www.rootsweb.com/usgenweb/ri/risearch.html
>
>
>
> ==== RIGENWEB Mailing List ====
> Kent County RIGenWeb http://www.rootsweb.com/~rikent/
> Search the RIGenWeb Pages http://www.rootsweb.com/~rigenweb/search.html
>


This thread: