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From: "Charlotte M. Maness" <>
Subject: [ROOTS-L] MISSOURI, Jefferson Co., BIRTHS & etc.
Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 14:46:20 -0700


Hello everyone, finally some "Pearls" for you all. I do hope you have
been having a good day. :-)

Charlotte

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Just to remind everyone -- Charlotte's "Pearls" are
now archived permanently at

http://www.rootsweb.com/~ote/usa_genealogy/mo_newspaper.htm
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JEFFERSON WATCHMAN
De Soto, Jefferson, Missouri

FRIDAY, 14 MARCH 1884.

The following were authorized to marry since last report: John T.
CLEMENS and Miss Martha J. TOLTEN, Feb'y 28; Theophile HUMBERT and Miss
Mary CAYLER, March 1st; G.W. KNORPP and Miss Margaret WAGNER, March 3d;
John M. SMITH and Miss Adelia J. CRAWFORD, March 5th; Emil HENTCHER and
Miss Mary HALTER, March 8th; Lawrence LANDENFELD and Miss Mary M.
McNULTY, March 10th; Frank SCOTT and Miss Mary HENDERSON, (col) 10th.

Garden Seeds That Will Grow. - I hope all my old friends will come and
bring their neighbors to get good sees, summer flowering bulbs and green
house plants. Our stock of plants is larger than was ever at De Soto,
many of which are scarce and rare. J.W. BUTCHER, March 12th, 1884

FRIDAY, 21 MARCH, 1884.

OBITUARY - Died, in De Soto, Mo., March 15th, 1884, William KNORPP, in
the 54th year of his age.
Mr. KNORPP was born Sept. 21st, 1830, at Stuttgart, Germany; came to
America in 1847, locating in the German Settlement in Plattin township,
this county, the same year; he married Feb'y 2d, 1851, to Miss Ernestine
FINISTER; he lived in the German settlement until 1865, when he came to
De Soto and engaged in merchandising until 1882; he was one of the
oldest business men in De Soto at the time of his death. He had been
confined to his room for three months past and most of the time he
suffered intensely, dying at length from dropsy. He retained
consciousness until within twenty-four hours of death. He leaves one
brother in this county and a sister in .p.Germany;, besides a wife and
two sons and four daughters, and a large number of warm-hearted friends
to mourn his death. He was ever a kind and faithful husband and parent
and had many excellent qualities as a man. Funeral services were held
at the family residence on Tuesday. Rev. SCHLEUTER, of the German M.E.
Church officiating, and a very large cortege followed the remains to
their final resting place in the city cemetery. Messrs. H. HAMEL, P.
FROMHOLD, Otto HERMAN, Chas. BEISBARTH, Carl SCHWENCK and Fred WALTHER
acting as pall-bearers.

FRIDAY, 28 MARCH 1884.

We the undersigned citizens and tax payers of the Second ward, do
respectfully request that you again enter the race for alderman of our
ward, you having with fidelity carried out our wishes, and we hereby
tender your our most hearty support in the race. Respectfully:
Aug. RACINE; Henry LEDERER; D. BAER; J.J. BALL, Jr.;
H. HOFFMAN; H. MEYER; G.C. HURSUNG; Rob't COXWELL;
John PRIESER; J.M. BRACEY; C.H.R. HANDCOCK; J.B. HANDCOCK;
H. KEMPE; George FLINT; S.I. RANDALL; B. MANHEIMER;
Chas. BAER; J.J. FRIEDMAN; Jas. A. CAIN; C.N. JENKINS;
C.W. WILLIAMSON; Chas. BEISBARTH; A. PECAUT; Geo. FETTE; Henry
JAHNSSENE; J.C. HALTER; J.D. SHAFER; A.P. SHAFER;
H.E. ZORN; H. HOHENTHAL; Gus. MARTIN; J.F. WALTHER;
A.L. FRECH; Geo. KUMMERMEHR; John THORP; John L. THOMAS;
John BRIDELL; Wm. M. ANDERSON

FRIDAY, 4 APRIL 1884.

J.W. BUTCHER of De Soto is in St. Louis this week serving as petit juror
in the U.S. Circuit Court.

Wm. M. ANDERSON has received notice that his claim for a pension has
been allowed, he will receive $4 per month from Aug., 1865.

Died, in this city, on the 16th of March 1884, of pneumonia, Millini E.,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry LAMAY aged one year and six months.

On Wednesday last a most shocking and distressing casualty occured in
the railroad yards in this city, by which a good man lost his life. John
FLEMMING, aged 27 years, who loved with is parents in this city, was a
repairer, and was at work at the time and place indicated, when a switch
engine ran into the car under which he was at work. He attempted to get
from under the car, but was caught and crushed beneath the wheels.
Coroner BREWSTER held an inquest, and the verdict of the jury was to the
effect that the company was responsible. FLEMMING was a member of
I.O.G.T. Lodge and als of the A.O.U.W. of De Soto

FRIDAY, 18 APRIL 1884.

The following marriage licenses were issued during the week by the
Recorder: Charles Gust HEIN and Matilda KABBE; Theodore J. HUNICKE and
Anna M. BRAUN; J.W. SENTER and Josephine PRESLEY.

OBITUARY. - Died, March 4, 1884, Noble IRWIN, aged 50 years.
Mr. IRWIN was a native of Ireland, but immigrated to this county 27
years ago, where he resided to the time of his death. He was a member
of the M.E. Church and lived a faithful Christian life, being earnest
and zealous in every good work. He leaves a wife, nine children and an
aged father and mother, to mourn the loss of an affectionate husband,
father and son. The have the sympathy of all who knew the deceased.
The writer of this was personally acquainted with Bro. IRWIN and knew
him to be wholly devoted to the service of his Divine Master. May the
Lord bless and comfort the afflicted ones.

FRIDAY, 2 MAY 1884.

MASSACRED BY NAVAJOS - A party of settlers in Southern Colorado
Beleaguered and Supposed to Have Been Massacres, After a Heroic Fight,
by a Band of Navajo Indians. (Denver, Col., April 25)
A. JOHNSON, present at the recent fight between the Navajos and whites
at MITCHELL's place. Lower San Juan River, Southern Colorado, arrived in
Durango yesterday. JOHNSON says: "Myself, Wm. GREEN and Victor NEFF
arrived at MITCHELL's store the evening of the 15th. A party of a dozen
Navajo Indians came to the store. One drew a gun on Edward MITCHELL.
While the quarrel progressed a Navajo named Lily Rye commenced removing
the buckskin from his rifle, and other Indians ran for their guns that
were standing against the store. Both the Indians and whites began
firing. After about twenty-five shots were exchanged the Indians
retreated across the river, leaving one dead on the ground. None of the
whites were hurt.
The whites then proceeded to throw up a fortification, while the women
showed great nerve carrying tubs of water to supply them in case of a
siege. JOHNSON then started for Fort Lewis. The commanding officer
immediately started a squad of calvary to the relief of MITCHELL's.
When they reached BOWEN Ferry a Navajo came in and reported that the
Utes had killed all the whites at MITCHELL's place.
So far no other word has been received, and JOHNSON fears all the
whites have massacred. It is not probable that the Utes went to the
scene to avenge the death of the Navajo Indian. It is common for one
tribe to lay its crimes to another.
The following is a list of whites there when JOHNSON left MITCHELL's
place: Old man MITCHELL and wife. Edgar MITCHELL, wife and three
children. Henry MITCHELL and wife. Joseph DOUGHERTY and wife. Peter
CHRISTMAN, Wm. POLAND, Wm. GREENE, and Victor NEFF. (This happened very
close to where I was born and grew up. Charlotte)

watchman



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