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Archiver > RUS-SARATOV-SCHILLING > 2010-02 > 1266122066


From:
Subject: Re: [SCHILLING] Military service in the Russian Army
Date: Sat, 13 Feb 2010 22:34:26 -0600
References: <4B76F6D3.16804.8CBC510@gpmartens.sbcglobal.net>,<C79C9DF2.37C7%j0hnc316aa@filbertfamily.net>
In-Reply-To: <C79C9DF2.37C7%j0hnc316aa@filbertfamily.net>


The Konstantinovka census will be available sometime in the future from
Prof. Brent Mai. He will send out an announcement when ready. He's been
making available close to 1 census per day for the past 2 weeks, so
hopefully this one will be soon.

For people interested in family records on people living in Alt-Schilling up
through about 1925, you can commission the Russian Archives in Engels to
do a report on the family. They prepare a written report, but it is not in
English, and needs to be translated. I recommend Dr. Mila Koretnikova,
who lives in Germany. She is fluent in English, Russian and German.
Gary Martens
Schilling villages VC



On 13 Feb 2010 at 18:20, John Filbert wrote:

> Gary, I would be very interested in purchasing a copy of the translated
> census.
>
> Cheers,
>
> John W. Filbert
> P.O. Box 2440
> 930 NW Highland Drive
> Waldport, OR 97394
> Home phone: 541-563-3394
> Cell phone: 541-270-7737
> Email:
>
>
>
> On 2/13/2010 5:00 PM, "Gary Martens" <> wrote:
>
> >
> > What's called the 1857 census for Konstantinovka is currently being
> > translated by Brent Mai. The village was founded in 1859, and when the
> > census is done, we'll be able to see who moved from Schilling to
> > Konstantinovka.
> >
> > Other settlers in Konstantinovka came from Jost, Merkel, Doenhof, Kutter
> > and Moor.
> >
> > A GR man was drafted in October or November, after his 21st birthday, but
> > they were supposed to be single. In August Filbert's case, an exception
> > may have been made because he probably could speak fairly good Russian,
> > and being a clerk, the Army could use him in a similar manner.
> >
> > Gary Martens
> > Schilling villages VC
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On 13 Feb 2010 at 11:03, John Filbert wrote:
> >
> >> It is our family's understanding that our grandfather, August Filbert II,
> >> was conscripted into the Russian army. He was born in 1870 and emigrated
> >> with his family (wife and three surviving children, parents and three
> >> siblings) in 1899 so it is probable that he served around 1890. Both he and
> >> his father (who emigrated with him) were "clerks", reading and writing both
> >> Russian and German. August II had a younger brother, Alexander, that lived
> >> to adulthood and also emigrated with the family. We have no record of
> >> Alexander's military service, or even if he served or not.
> >>
> >> Grandfather August Filbert II is believed to have been born in Neu-Schilling
> >> (or Konstantinovka), with his father having been born in Alt-Schilling.
> >>
> >>
> >> On 2/12/2010 9:41 PM, "Gary Martens" <> wrote:
> >>
> >>>
> >>> How many of you have heard stories about your male ancestors where they
> >>> were supposed to have served in the Russian Army, fought in wars, etc.
> >>> Here is information on the rules under which German-Russians in the Volga
> >>> were drafted.
> >>>
> >>> ====================================================
> >>>
> >>> This information is from the book "From Privileged to Dispossessed, The
> >>> Volga Germans, 1860 -1917", by James W. Long, Copyright 1988,
> >>> University of
> >>> Nebraska Press.
> >>>
> >>> The universal conscription law of 1874 was based on peacetime conditions,
> >>> and in fact, did not enroll many recruits. The number of men conscripted
> >>> each year depended on the contingent required by the military: in 1874 it
> >>> was 150,000; it rose in 1900 to 320,000. However, the law's shorter term of
> >>> service and maintenance of a large reserve component had tremendous
> >>> implications, in that many more individuals served in the armed forces.
> >>> Because the prosperity of peasant families, and therefore the state
> >>> depended
> >>> primarily on the number of workers, the 1874 conscription law drafted men
> >>> only from families with several workers. Also, the costs of equipping and
> >>> training every draft-age youth would have been prohibitive. Therefore, each
> >>> year approximately 54 percent of the draft-age men were exempted from
> >>> active
> >>> duty in the military service. Most exemptions (48 percent) were granted on
> >>> the basis of domestic or family reasons; 6 percent were based on failure to
> >>> meet physical standards. Sole surviving sons, married men, or sons and
> >>> grandsons who were the only workers in their households were
> >>> unconditionally
> >>> exempted from military service. Others, such as sons who were the second
> >>> workers in their households, next eldest sons with brothers on active duty,
> >>> and sons whose elder brothers had died while on active duty, received
> >>> conditional exemption. They would be drafted only if the number of
> >>> non-exempted recruits was inadequate to meet the military's annual
> >>> contingent. While sole surviving sons were never liable for military
> >>> service. The conditional exemptees could be called up in time of war.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> The annual conscription levy took place in the fall after the harvest. Any
> >>> young man having his twenty-first birthday before October 1 of that year was
> >>> subject to the draft. On November 12, 1874, the first Volga German draft
> >>> lottery occurred in the colony of Linevo Ozero. The colonies had ten draft
> >>> centers, all except one including both Russian and German settlements.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Data from the Saratov and Samara provinces indicate that between 1874
> >>> and
> >>> 1914 the Volga Germans annually supplied 800 to 1500 recruits to the
> >>> Russian
> >>> military, depending on the annual levy set by military authorities. Thus,
> >>> every year about one of every five draft-eligible, twenty-one year old male
> >>> colonists entered the Russian Army. By 1914, then, conservatively
> >>> speaking,
> >>> 50,000 Volga Germans had spent time in the ranks.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Mobilization of reservists, not conscription, drove more Volga Germans from
> >>> Russia, and until 1904-three decades after the introduction of the
> >>> draft-their reservists had never been activated. The Russo-Japanese War
> >>> of
> >>> 1904-5 generated such consternation and dismay among the Volga
> >>> Germans
> >>> because it represented the first encounter with mobilization; at the time
> >>> of the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-78 no Volga German reservists existed,
> >>> for
> >>> one had completed the six-year term of active duty.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Beginning in 1904, many Volga German reservists-men between the ages
> >>> of
> >>> twenty-five and forty-three, some of whom had been discharged as far back
> >>> as
> >>> 1886-decided to emigrate illegally rather than face being reactivated to
> >>> fight in some distant war of no concern to them.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> My grandfather was in the Russian Army from approximately November
> >>> 1906
> >>> until sometime before May 1910. A picture of him in his Russian Army
> >>> uniform is here: http://www.germanrussian.org/
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Gary Martens
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
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