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From: "Tombi Peck" <>
Subject: Re: [ZA-EC] Ship "Northampton" info from Brit Maritime Records....
Date: Tue, 9 Aug 2005 17:43:41 +0100
References: <4CA1C7ED69BC2544AF082924D3AAD32B07EC301D@wwrc-mail1.wwrc.state.va.us>


Fascinating...thank you...I do so enjoy these pieces...more to stuff into my
over-stuffed brain....
Some years ago when attending some friends' daughter's wedding on Corfu (he
was the Anglican Vicar there) all the guests stayed at a villa which had
lost all its guests due to a holiday company crash..it was rather like
staying in a private family home...each night there was some 'activity'
organised by the very competitive relatives of the bridegroom (his dad was
also an Anglican Vicar)...there were vicars around every corner! Anyway,
one night they decided we would have a quiz...they had spent a lot of time
gibing at me as I relaxed next to the pool (my grandson was learning to swim
at the tim) and read typical 'holiday reading' novels. They paired me with
my daughter (who at the time was a barmaid) and the mother of the bride...to
the horror of all these highly educated men (degrees falling out of every
pocket) we thrashed them....
I didn't crow, but I didn't tell them that my daughter has an I.Q of 148 and
reads as widely as I do...Still brings a smile to my face!!
Groete,
Tombi
----- Original Message -----
From: "Foster, Coral A." <>
To: <>
Sent: Tuesday, August 09, 2005 3:27 PM
Subject: RE: [ZA-EC] Ship "Northampton" info from Brit Maritime Records....


>
>
> Maritime Archives & Library
> Sheet No. 12 : Emigration to Australia, New Zealand and South Africa
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
>
> Australia
> The first emigrants to Australia were those forcibly transported in the
late 18th century. The American War of Independence in 1783 meant an end to
transportation to the American Colonies, and following the establishment of
a Penal Colony at Botany Bay, New South Wales in 1788, Australia became the
focus for transportation. Thousands were transported as convicts, and often
their wives and families were sent out with them.
>
> "Free settlers" such as farmers and traders also emigrated to Australia
seeking new opportunities, or assisted by emigration societies encouraged by
colonists to help with the labour shortage. This was especially the case in
the mid-19th century during the Irish famine, and also large numbers of
Scottish emigrants from the Highlands (1851-1859) were assisted by the
Highland and Island Emigration Society. Emigrants made a variety of new
lives for themselves in Australia and New Zealand; they found work on farms,
in industry and building railways. Emigration to Australia peaked during
the 1850s when many people hoped to find their fortune on the newly
discovered goldfields.
>
> Child emigration was undertaken by religious and charitable organisations
with Canada and Australia being the main destinations. The Children's
Friend Society, established in 1830, sent out its first party of child
migrants to Australia in 1832. In 1844 the Ragged School Movement began,
and sent out 150 children to New South Wales in 1849. In 1850 Parliament
legalised Poor Law Guardians to fund emigration of children to the colonies.
In the 20th century Australia became the main destination for child
emigrants, attracting over 3,000 between 1947 and 1953, and was active in
promoting the emigration of British families after the end of World War II
(see Information Sheet 10: Child Emigration, for further details).
>
> New Zealand
> Emigration to New Zealand did not really begin until the 1840s when it
became a British Colony. This was because New Zealand had never been a
penal colony and had only been settled by Europeans in the 1820s.
Immigration schemes began in 1840. The British Colonial politician, E.G.
Wakefield, manager of the New Zealand Company (1839-1849) was opposed to
offering free land to settlers, so instead advocated that land should be
sold and the profits used to finance emigrants, to obtain labourers, who
would have their passage paid for in return for their labour. (He had
previously instigated this scheme in Australia a decade earlier.) Land was
aggressively purchased from the Maoris to sell to the settlers, resulting in
a number of wars between the settlers and the natives. Emigration escalated
in 1861 with the discovery of gold, with New Zealand's population rocketing
from 99,000 in 1861 to 256,000 in 1871.[1]
>
>
>
>
> From the 1870s onwards, a large number of public work projects to build
roads and railways, required labourers who were mainly recruited in England
and Northern Europe. They were given assisted passage, with as many as
46,000 arriving in 1874 alone. Immigration continued in lesser numbers
until the economic depression in the 1890s and World War I. Travel
subsidies were still available between both the wars and after Word War II
into the 1960s, when a more cautious, limited immigration assistance was
offered mainly to British subjects. Many emigrants to New Zealand travelled
via Australia, so Australian records may be of assistance for research.
>
> South Africa
> In 1806 the Cape of Good Hope was ceded to Britain from Holland and
Britons began to settle there. Despite armed clashes with the Boers and
Zulus, an assisted emigration scheme to help settle the colony was
introduced by the government in 1819; the first party of settlers arriving
at Algoa Bay in 1820 after a three month voyage. From 1870 onwards
emigration to the colony increased following the discovery of gold and
diamonds.
>
> Some settlers sailed from Liverpool to South Africa. The British settlers
of 1820 are extremely well documented. The original records are in the
Public Archives of the Cape Province, Cape Town, Republic of South Africa
(Reference Vol. CO 6137 and CO 6138). Others sailed for Natal around 1850
and are documented in the Natal Archives, Pietermaritzburg.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Viv Kymdell [mailto:]
> Sent: Tuesday, August 09, 2005 10:15 AM
> To:
> Subject: Re: [ZA-EC] Ship "Northampton" / KYMDELL
>
>
> Hi Coral, do you know of a UK website where I could search for the
> Northampton and its logs?
>
> Regards,
>
> Viv.
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Foster, Coral A." <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Tuesday, August 09, 2005 3:48 PM
> Subject: RE: [ZA-EC] Ship "Northampton" / KYMDELL
>
>
> well, they obviously did more than one trip in it from the various
parties,
> I think that docking note might have been for the first trip? But, I was
> thinking that there might be something mentioned in diaries or notes on
the
> leaders of the parties or other passengers we know fore sure traveled on
the
> NH?
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Viv Kymdell [mailto:]
> Sent: Tuesday, August 09, 2005 8:28 AM
> To:
> Subject: Re: [ZA-EC] Ship "Northampton" / KYMDELL
>
>
> Hi Coral,
>
> Thanks for all the trouble you have gone to on the Nothampton, but KYMDELL
> only came to SA c 1852 and not with the Settlers. I was hoping that this
> ship would have stayed on the waters for 30 odd years!?:-)) Your e-mail
was
> nonetheless very interesting and will be of benefit to others as well,
> thanks again.
>
> Best regards,
>
> Viv.
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Foster, Coral A." <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Tuesday, August 09, 2005 1:55 PM
> Subject: RE: [ZA-EC] Ship "Northampton" / KYMDELL
>
>
> Dag s^e, Val:
>
> With regard to your note, I'm hoping some of the following will be of use
in
> your search for your KYMDELL. However, there is no mention of him in this
> book at all.
>
> This is what I found in Morse-Jones' book: the ship "NORTHAMPTON" as
having
> left London in Dec 1819, arrived in Table Bay Mar 1820, Simon's Bay Mar.
> 1820 and then finally, Algoa Bay in 1820
>
> Then there's a further note on the parties that sailed in the
"NORTHAMPTON"
> on various voyages (from what I surmize): CLARKE's (party) Divided from
> MAHONEY's London party in "NORTHAMPTON". 88 persons were led by Surgeon
> William CLARKE. They were located at the source of the BOTHAS RIVER, the
> location being named COLLINGHAM. A subdivision of them shortly left for
the
> CLAY PITS on the COOMBS River. This was in 1819. (CLARKE died in 1825).
>
> DALGAIRNS' (party): A party of 33 from London led by Charles DALGAIRNS
> sailed in "NORTHAMPTON". They were located on BLAAUW KRANTZ on the left
> bank of the BLAAUW KRANTZ RIVER. His daughter MARTHA DALGAIRN was
married
> to surgeon CHARLES WENTWORTH, She opened a school for girls @ MELKHOUT
> KRAAL, KNYSNA.
>
> MAHONEY'S Thomas MAHONEY organized a party in London. Before embarkation
> it was divided, Surgeon William CLARKE leading 88 as a separate party. 42
> led by Thomas MAHONEY sailed in "NORTHAMPTON". They were located on the
> right bank of the COOMBS RIVER their location being known as THE COOMBS.
> Thomas BERRINGTON was early(sic) responsible for the party, Thomas MAHONEY
> being absent on building contracts. The party had dispersed by 1825, the
> land then being held by Thomas MAHONEY.
>
> PIGOT'S A party of 54 from Berkshire led by Major George PIGOT sailed in
> "NORTHAMPTON". They were located on the left bank of the BLAAUW KRANTZ
> RIVER the location being called PIGOT PARK.
>
> Further: Thomas MAHONEY (an architect) est. a brewery near THE COOMBS
abt.
> 1824. He was killed by Xhosas near his home at the outbreak of the war of
> 1834 - 1835.
>
> PIGOT, SOPHIA - there is a diary (? published) in ALBANY MUSEUM
>
>
>
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