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From: "Heather MacAlister - Ancestry 24" <>
Subject: Re: [ZA-EC] Cape Mounted Riflemen
Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2008 06:28:40 +0200
References: <004a01c8d77b$68bb6540$0402a8c0@richardlaptop1><00a701c8d7d1$714a71a0$0201010a@macleodfamily><5665B5EBD32E430AA5696731FCF23190@TombiPeckPC><00be01c8d7f2$cfbc49e0$0201010a@macleodfamily>
In-Reply-To: <00be01c8d7f2$cfbc49e0$0201010a@macleodfamily>


CAPE MOUNTED RIFLEMEN

Probably the most famous of the old military units of the Cape, the Cape
Mounted Riflemen could claim direct descent from the Pandours and
original Cape Corps of the 18th century. When Gen. J. W. Janssens
surrendered to the British on 18 Jan. 7806, the battalion of Hottentot
Light Infantry in the Dutch service was specifically allowed to enlist
in the British service, and these men were formed into the Cape
Regiment, 500 strong, under Lt.-Col. John Graham, with headquarters at
Simonstown, a detachment being sent to garrison Fort Frederick at Algoa
Bay. In 1808 regimental strength was increased to 800, with White
officers, and the Cape Regiment subsequently played a leading part in
patrolling the eastern frontier districts, the whole regiment being sent
to Algoa Bay in 1810 and distinguishing itself in the defence of
Grahamstown against the Xhosas in April 1819.

In 1827 the corps was reorganised as a cavalry unit and adopted the name
Cape Mounted Riflemen, a regular regiment of six squadrons, with
Coloured men serving under seconded British officers and
non-commissioned officers. In succeeding years the Cape Mounted Riflemen
were in action on almost every occasion of unrest affecting the Cape
Colony, including the Seventh Frontier War (1846-47), the Battle of
Boomplaats (1848), the Boomah Pass action against Sandile (1850) - by
which time 8 of the unit's 12 troops were Whites - the fighting against
the Basuto in 1852, numerous clashes on the eastern frontier, including
the Ninth Frontier War (1877-78), and general patrol duties in
conjunction with the Frontier Armed and Mounted Police, which had been
formed by combining the different rural police bodies in the Eastern
Province under a single commandant. By 1876 the F.A.M.P. had detachments
at Queenstown, Kokstad, Komga, Palmietfontein, King William's Town,
Butterworth, Peddie, Kenhardt, Ealing Post and Fort Murray . For reasons
of economy the imperial C.M.R. had been recalled to England in 1870,
with only ten Coloured members left, all the rest being White
volunteers, who were disbanded. In 1878 the F.A.M.P. were reorganised as
a regular regiment of mounted riflemen and took over the famous name of
the Cape Mounted Riflemen, with a dual function as a police force and a
military unit, all ranks being carefully selected in the Colony and
later in England . The Colonial C.M.R. were organised with the
Government only supplying arms and ammunition initially, but this was
found unsatisfactory during the Ninth Frontier War, and by 1895 the
commanding officer of the C.M.R. was virtually in command of the whole
of the Cape forces. The C.M.R. itself had been in action at Morosi's
Mountain (1879) and in the Basuto Rebellion (1880-81), and in 1897
played a leading part in the Bechuanaland (Langeberg) campaign.

During the Second Anglo-Boer War the C.M.R. served in the Colonial
Division, with their commanding officer, Col. E. H. Dalgety, being in
command during the 17 days of the siege of Wepener. Capt. H. T. ('Tim')
Lukin (later to command the South African infantry brigade in France in
the First World War) commanded the C.M.R. artillery. After the war the
C.M.R. were in charge of most volunteer training in the Cape Colony . In
1912 Col. Lukin became Inspector-General of the newly constituted South
African Permanent Force, with the rank of brigadier-general, and his
regiment was merged into the new South African Mounted Riflemen in 1913,
thus helping to lay the foundation of the Permanent Force, as the first
of its five regiments. The artillery troop of the C.M.R., originally
raised as a troop of the F.A.M.P. in 1874, became the Permanent Cape
Field Artillery from 1880 to 1884, and eventually came into the Union
Defence Force in 1913 as the 1st Battery, South African Mounted
Riflemen, equipped with 13-pounder quick-firing guns. (See also
Artillery, South African.)

Cape Mounted Rifleman Records
Amathole Museum
The Curator
PO Box 1434
King William's Town
5600

Tel: +27 (0433) 24506
Fax: +27 (0433) 21569
E-mail:

Regards

Heather MacAlister
Channel Manager
T 27 21 468 8088
F 27 21 468 8207
M 082 8082251

MSN





-----Original Message-----
From:
[mailto:] On Behalf Of
Lynn MacLeod
Sent: 27 June 2008 03:12 AM
To:
Subject: Re: [ZA-EC] Cape Mounted Riflemen

Hi Tombi
Not too sure about this but then from Encyclopaedia of Southern Africa -

Rosenthal
Cape Mounted Riflemen (C.M.R.)
Semi-military unit developed from the Frontier Armed and Mounted Police
established in 1878. Specially organised for rapid movement, members
being
responsible for their own transport and supplies. It gained much
distinction in the Morosi Campaign of 1879, the Gun War of 1881, the
Langeberg Campaign and the Boer War. In 1913 became the First Regiment
of
the South African Mounted Rifles.

Cape Mounted Riflemen (Imperial)
Early regiment raised at the Cape in 1806, with British officers and
Cape
Coloured men. Disbanded in 1817, but was reorganised and continued
until
1870. Not to be confused with the Cape Mounted Riflemen (C.M.R.)
I find all these military regiments and the like very confusing as they
were
for ever changing the names or merging!!
Take care
Lynn
----- Original Message -----
From: "Tombi Peck" <>
To: <>
Sent: Friday, June 27, 2008 10:18 AM
Subject: Re: [ZA-EC] Cape Mounted Riflemen


> Hi,
> My gg grandfather Richard George TAINTON and his younger brother James

> John
> Henry TAINTON were both members of the Cape Mounted Rifles....they
were
> 'police' rather than 'soldiers' as I understand it. Do I have this
wrong!
> Best wishes,
> Tombi Peck
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Lynn MacLeod" <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Thursday, June 26, 2008 10:13 PM
> Subject: Re: [ZA-EC] Cape Mounted Riflemen
>
>
>> Hi Richard
>> I have not been able to find your David RUDD in any listing - British
>> Residents at the Cape 1795-1819 by Peter Philip or on the list of
those
>> soldiers and sailors who were granted permission to remain at the
Cape
>> 1815-1824.
>>
>>>From the above book
>> Cape Regiment : this was a Hottentot regiment with European officers
and
>> non-commissioner officers. It saw much active service on the
frontier
>> and
>> conducted itself with distinction. The regiment changed its name from

>> time
>> to time:
>> The Pandours (under Dutch Administration) 1793-1796
>> Cape Corps (first British occupation) 1796-1803
>> Hottentot Light Infantry (Batavian Rep.) 1803-1806
>> Cape Regiment (re-formed by Col. Graham) 1806-1817
>> Cape Corps of Cavalry & Infantry - 1817-1827
>> Cape MOunted Rifles 1827 -


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