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Archiver > SOUTH-AFRICA > 2001-03 > 0984459386


From: "Steve Hayes" <>
Subject: Re: NAAIRS query
Date: Tue, 13 Mar 2001 06:56:26 +0200
In-Reply-To: <002501c0ab29$cec06ce0$31c807c4@oemsystem>


On 12 Mar 01, at 20:37, Jill Martin wrote:

> My question is with regard to estate papers. I've found a number of them
> relating to my forebears, and would like to know what kind of details they
> include.

That varies according to the amount of property they had, the complexity of
the estate and the knowledge of the people who completed the documents.

If the death notice was filled in by a lawyer, for example, the parents would
often be listed as "deceased", or if it was a hotel keeper or hospital
administrator it might be "unknown". If a spouse didn't know the names of
their in-laws, then it could indicate a "black sheep"

A complex will can lead to all kinds of information - for example children or
spouses of predeceased legatees. So DON'T just look at the death notice -
check the distribution accounts to see who got what - it sometimes gives
names,. addresses, ages and relationships in considerable detail.

A maiden aunt or uncle is usually a good find, especially a rich one. You
may not get the money, but you can get a lot of genealogical information
about the relatives who got a fifth of a fourth of a third of their estate.

Keep well,

Steve Hayes
Web: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/famhist1.htm
E-mail:



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