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From:
Subject: [ZA] HOBSON
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2003 20:31:50 -0000


During the late 19 sixties a (woodwork) schoolteacher at Carnarvon High
School, Bonnie Hobson, shot himself through the stomach by accident. My
father, a GP, sewed his guts up.

I remain, as always,
Your Most Humble Savant,
Francois Greeff


Hiddencode.co.uk
Second Floor, Elmfield House
5 Stockwell Mews
London
SW9 9GX

Tel 020 77373 5500


--------- Original Message --------
From:
To: <>
Subject: [ZA] Putting the fun back into Genealogy - HOBSON
Date: 21/10/03 21:33

>
> The grandson of Thomas HOBSON, Collins HOBSON (1731 - 1795) m. Ann
> PICKERING and lived in Northamptonshire. They had the following sons:
> 1. George
> 2. John
> 3. James
> 4. Richard
> 5. William HOBSON, m. Ann CAREY, sister of the famous Dr. William
> CAREY of Bengal and Professor of Sanskrit at Fort William College,
> Calcutta. William and Ann HOBSON had four sons - Jessie, Levi, David
> and William Carey. The last two were 1820 Settlers.
>
> After their father, William's death in 1816, the family farmed at
> Cottesbrooke as tenants of Sir James LANGHAM, Bart. William's widow,
> Ann HOBSON, who was a very strong character, continued to hold church
> services at her home despite her landlord's opposition. Sir James
> wrote on evicting her and her family: &quot;I shall never feel disposed to
> surrender my farms and houses to those who oppose my wishes in matters
> which I consider of the utmost importance. Besides, yours is a
> conspicuous family and of much influence in the neighbourhood&quot;.
>
> After the eviction it would appear that Ann HOBSON and her family
> returned to her birthplace, Paulersbury, from where David and William
> Carey despatched seed to their uncle in India, so that they must have
> continued farming.
>
> a. David HOBSON (1796 - 1875) immigrated to the Cape in 1820 with his
> younger brother (a) William Carey (always known as &quot;Carey&quot;)
(1805 -
> 1870), who was only 15 years old. They sailed in the Northampton as
> members of William SMITH's party and were allocated land at
> Stoneyvale. David named his farm &quot;Cottesbrooke&quot; and Carey named
his
> &quot;Salem&quot;.
>
> David HOBSON m. Mary Ann (b. 1806) dau. of Thomas and Mary
> Ann ROBINSON who came out on the Aurora. Their children were:
>
> b1. Mary Ann m. Ebenezer BIGGS and their descendants still live at
> &quot;Wellfound&quot;.
> b2. Phoebe Prudence m. her cousin William H.V. NASH
> b3. David Edmund m. Harriet LEPPAN. He became a J.P.
> b4. Hannah m. Mr. TEMLETT
> b5. William Carey m. Elizabeth, dau. of the preacher, Daniel ROBERTS.
> b6. Joshua m. Selina, dau. of Isaac HUBBARD, Governor of the jail in
> Grahamstown. Lived later at &quot;Wellfound&quot; and taught all the
children.
> b7. Jesse m. Selina HUBBARD's sister
> There are many BIGGS, NASH, and HOBSON descendants of these marriages.
>
> a. William Carey HOBSON (David's brother) m. Susannah, dau. of Samuel
> and Ann BONNIN, settlers, who came out in the Aurora. Their children
> were:
>
> b1. Sarah Carey, m. Richard PARKES and had nine children
> b2. Ann m, William BERRINGTON (of Sidbury Park)
> b3. Samuel Bonnin m1. Mary EDWARDS, m2. Anne CARTER. there were 11
> children including the HOBSON's of Ebenezer.
> b4. Jonathan m. Ruth, dau. of Settler Daniel ROBERTS. Jonathan was
> born during the 1835 war. His mother, Susannah, heard that her husband
> Carey, had been killed, but it was later found that the dead man was
> Richard BLAND, her sister, Caroline's husband. Their two children were
> William Carey BLAND and Sarah Ann BLAND who later married John Francis
> SLATER.
>
> The HOBSON brothers, David and Cary, Richard BLAND and John COMFIELD,
> the artist were friends and came out together on the Northampton.
> COMFIELD soon got tired of the rigorous life on the Stoneyvale location
> and went to Algoa Bay. The other three persevered through the lean
> periods, weathering the Xhosa raids and bad harvests. Carey then found
> it necessary to earn a living firstly as a tutor to an Afrikaans
> household and later as a &quot;smous&quot; trading in the interior and in
> Basutoland, being one of the first white men to go there. He later
> joined the Commissariat department of the Army, buying cattle and
> grain for the Army from the Xhosa in the Neutral Territory. At the
> onset of the Sixth Frontier War in 1834, Carey had a narrow escape from
> Gualana Post when it was overrun by the Xhosa. In this war the three
> friends served in the Albany Mounted Sharpshooters where they were
> known as &quot;The Three Musketeers&quot;.
>
> Richard BLAND was killed in the Fish River bush. When the HOBSON
> brothers returned to the farms &quot;Cottesbrooke&quot; and
&quot;Salem&quot; they found
> them both completely burnt out and they had to make a fresh start. The
> first Settler to be killed on the frontier was Benjamin ANDERSON, a
> boy of 15, who was murdered while herding cattle on David HOBSON's farm
> in 1821.
>
> Best wishes
> Becky
> Port Elizabeth, South Africa
>
> Researching: HENWICK; HILL; HORN(E); MEREDITH; DEYZEL; LARSEN; WILSON;
> LYNAR; HENNING; STERLEY; THECK; BEST; BRAUN, GREENER; GLANVILLE.
>
>
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