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Archiver > SOUTHERN-UNIONIST > 2008-10 > 1223400585


From: "Margaret Behel" <>
Subject: Re: [SOUTHERN-UNIONIST] Corinth, Camp Davies and Camp Glendale
Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2008 12:29:45 -0500
References: <Pine.OSF.4.44.0810070725470.1033434-100000@ant.hiwaay.net>


Ryan,

Would you share that data regarding the ages with those of us on the list.
It will be a very interesting analysis.

Margaret Behel

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ryan Dupree" <>
To: <>
Sent: Tuesday, October 07, 2008 7:28 AM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHERN-UNIONIST] Corinth, Camp Davies and Camp Glendale


>
> You want the approximate age of all who were in Co L in 1864 in accordance
> to their age in muster rolls? I can have that to you this evening if you
> like...
>
> Sherman talked alot about the teenagers, both north and south, and the
> "effort" that they put into making war. In the south, many of these bands
> of teenagers that he was facing were not mustered into service, or really
> home guard, but were teens out to make war....and they reveled in it.
>
> -Ryan
>
> On Tue, 7 Oct 2008 wrote:
>
>> Don,
>>
>> Good point, and that certainly is a possibility. Considering your ideas
> about a good number of them being teenagers, it would be good to look
> back at the roster and see if we can establish ages. I know that with a
> lot of Southern families there were rifts between fathers and sons
> regarding the whole idea of secession. My experience has been that the
> fathers were typically anti-secesh and the sons got carried away in the
> secesh movement. Of course, in this case, if most of them were teenagers,
> it would challenge this approach. This is why I am wondering if?most
> actually were teenagers or were older men. This is exactly the type of
> historical analysis I like to see.
>>
>> Robert Moore
>>
>>
>>
>> >From what I read, Company L was given the honor of setting fire to
>> >places
>> around Corinth that might of military importance. Why them? Perhaps it
>> was
>> because of the heavy losses suffered by the recently formed Co. L at
>> Vincent's
>> Cross Roads a few months earlier.
>>
>> Here is an excerpt on this subject from the book Southerners in Blue, p.
>> 165:
>>
>> "The mounted men of the First Alabama had been given orders to set fire
>> to
>> buildings in Corinth that might subsequently help the Confederacy,
>> including the
>> barracks, hospital, stables, and many warehouses. They were told not to
>> harm
>> private property.
>>
>> "As buidlings were torched, however, it wasn't possible to keep the fire
>> from
>> spreading to other buildings--at least that was the story reported by the
>> major
>> in charge of this detail. The complete truth was that it wasn't really
>> possible
>> to control every soldier running through town with a torch in his hand.
>> So in
>> the end, one really couldn't tell if some of the blazes had been set on
>> purpose.
>>
>> "The Tishimingo Hotel caught on fire, and so did the Corinth House.
>> Corona
>> College was in flames, as were many businesses and residences. An
>> occasional
>> shell that had been left behind exploded into the air.
>>
>> "Before the war, Corinth had been a sleepy southern town on the
>> cross-roads of
>> two railroads. With the war came the soldiers, first Confederate and
>> then
>> Union. The town had been desecrated by whores, gamblers, and thousands
>> of men
>> whose hometowns and personally loyalties were hundreds of miles away. On
>> this
>> day, January 25, 1864, the town suffered one final insult as much of it
>> went up
>> in smoke."
>>
>>
>> I'm thinking a lot of those torch-bearers were teenagers who just got
>> carried
>> away.
>>
>> What do you think, Robert?
>>
>> Don
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Quarry Press <>
>> To:
>> Sent: Mon, 6 Oct 2008 11:32 pm
>> Subject: Re: [SOUTHERN-UNIONIST] Corinth, Camp Davies and Camp Glendale
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> >From what I read, Company L was given the honor of setting fire to
>> >places
>> around Corinth that might of military importance. Why them? Perhaps it
>> was
>> because of the heavy losses suffered by the recently formed Co. L at
>> Vincent's
>> Cross Roads a few months earlier.
>>
>> Here is an excerpt on this subject from the book Southerners in Blue, p.
>> 165:
>>
>> "The mounted men of the First Alabama had been given orders to set fire
>> to
>> buildings in Corinth that might subsequently help the Confederacy,
>> including the
>> barracks, hospital, stables, and many warehouses. They were told not to
>> harm
>> private property.
>>
>> "As buidlings were torched, however, it wasn't possible to keep the fire
>> from
>> spreading to other buildings--at least that was the story reported by the
>> major
>> in charge of this detail. The complete truth was that it wasn't really
>> possible
>> to control every soldier running through town with a torch in his hand.
>> So in
>> the end, one really couldn't tell if some of the blazes had been set on
>> purpose.
>>
>> "The Tishimingo Hotel caught on fire, and so did the Corinth House.
>> Corona
>> College was in flames, as were many businesses and residences. An
>> occasional
>> shell that had been left behind exploded into the air.
>>
>> "Before the war, Corinth had been a sleepy southern town on the
>> cross-roads of
>> two railroads. With the war came the soldiers, first Confederate and
>> then
>> Union. The town had been desecrated by whores, gamblers, and thousands
>> of men
>> whose hometowns and personally loyalties were hundreds of miles away. On
>> this
>> day, January 25, 1864, the town suffered one final insult as much of it
>> went up
>> in smoke."
>>
>>
>> I'm thinking a lot of those torch-bearers were teenagers who just got
>> carried
>> away.
>>
>> What do you think, Robert?
>>
>> Don
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > From: > Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2008 23:04:14 -0400> To:
>> > Subject: Re: [SOUTHERN-UNIONIST] Corinth,
>> Camp
>> Davies and Camp Glendale> > > Thanks Don. Although, it would be
>> interesting to
>> know individual stories > about the men in Co. L an
>> d (apart from duty) what, if
>> anything, may have > influenced their decision to burn the place.> >
>> Robert
>> Moore> > In a message dated 10/6/2008 10:55:17 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
>> >
>> writes:> > Thank you, gentlemen. In my earlier
>> missive, I
>> was not addressing the > motivations of the soldiers who torched Corinth
>> but
>> simply stating lingering > sentiment among many who live in northeast
>> Mississippi. My g-grandfather was > Sgt. John R. Phillips of Co. L, First
>> Alabama Cav., and I've done some research > about what he and his
>> neighbors went
>> through before joining the Union army. > I was not waving the stars and
>> bars.> >
>> Don Umphrey> > > > > > > > **************New MapQuest Local shows what'!
>> s happening at your destination. > Dining, Movies, Events, News & more.
>> Try it
>> out! > (http://local.mapquest.com/?ncid=emlcntnew00000001)>; >
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