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From: "janet ariciu" <>
Subject: Re: [SUGGS] Fwd: Re: GENEALOGY
Date: Tue, 2 Jan 2001 07:03:36 -0000


Jeanie Hill. I have Hills in my other line. janet
I am sorry but I don't A. H . Suggs but here is place that might help you.
From: Ed Sanders <>
To: <>
Ed is Welcome aboard!
> We are happy to make your acquaintance.
> AGS-L is the official mailing list for the Arkansas Genealogical Society
and
> everyone is welcome to participate.
> This is our way of encouraging more and better genealogical/historical
> research among members and non-members alike.
>
> The web address for AGS-L is:
> <http://www.rootsweb.com/~args/>;
>
> I am Ed Sanders, a 20-year board member and 4 terms president of the
> Arkansas Genealogical Society. My home is in Searcy, AR, where I am a
> professor emeritus of Harding University.
> When I can, I offer encouragement, advice, and information to those who
use
> the list.
> Best wishes,
> Ed
Good Luck janet
----- Original Message -----
From: Jeanie and Joe Hill <>
To: <>
Sent: Monday, January 01, 2001 9:15 PM
Subject: Re: [SUGGS] Fwd: Re: GENEALOGY


> Hi Janet,
>
> Did you by any chance stumble across a A.H. Suggs in your research? My
> great-grandfather, A.H. (Azz) Suggs married my great-grandmother in Polk
> County, AR in 1904. He later moved on to Louisiana where one of his
> sister's who married his wife's brother settled. Her name was Essie
> Suggs I believe. I have been trying to track down this Suggs line for
> some time but to no avail. Any help you could give me would be greatly
> appreciated.
> Thanks,
> Jeanie
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "janet ariciu" <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2000 1:57 AM
> Subject: Re: [SUGGS] Fwd: Re: GENEALOGY
>
>
> > Hi Suggs cousin. There three brothers who came from England to
> Amercia. My
> > "Suggs" family VA to NC to TN to AL to TN to Ark to Ok/TX. Henry Suggs
> b
> > 1799 in NC his parents unknown but I have his family here
> > www.geocities.com/janet_ariciu
> > Janet
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: Michael Brown <>
> > To: <>
> > Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2000 6:29 AM
> > Subject: [SUGGS] Fwd: Re: GENEALOGY
> >
> >
> > >
> > > --WebTV-Mail-18428-3604
> > > Content-Type: Text/Plain; Charset=US-ASCII
> > > Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > To The SUGGS Family,
> > >
> > > Hope this nice lineage can prove
> > > useful and informative.....
> > >
> > > Mike in CA
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Michael David Brown
> > > Bakersfield Brigade
> > >
> > >
> > > --WebTV-Mail-18428-3604
> > > Content-Disposition: Inline
> > > Content-Type: Message/RFC822
> > > Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit
> > >
> > > Received: from smtpin-101-8.bryant.webtv.net (209.240.198.42) by
> > > storefull-236.iap.bryant.webtv.net with WTV-SMTP; Sun, 24 Dec 2000
> > > 07:58:32 -0800 (PST)
> > > Received: by smtpin-101-8.bryant.webtv.net (WebTV_Postfix) id
> B959012D;
> > Sun,
> > > 24 Dec 2000 07:58:31 -0800 (PST)
> > > Delivered-To:
> > > Received: from fn4.tfn.net (fn4.tfn.net [150.176.31.251]) by
> > > smtpin-101-8.bryant.webtv.net (WebTV_Postfix) with ESMTP id 9C025FD
> > > for <>; Sun, 24 Dec 2000 07:58:27 -0800 (PST)
> > > Received: from SaltwaterMusic.com (fts4p30-bfs.tfn.net
> [146.201.23.126])
> > by
> > > fn4.tfn.net (8.8.8/8.6.9) with ESMTP id LAA17569 for
> <>;
> > > Sun, 24 Dec 2000 11:25:27 -0500 (EST)
> > > Message-ID: <>
> > > Date: Sun, 24 Dec 2000 11:02:43 -0500
> > > From: Del Suggs <>
> > > X-Mailer: Mozilla 4.05 [en] (Win95; U)
> > > MIME-Version: 1.0
> > > To: Michael Brown <>
> > > Subject: Re: GENEALOGY
> > > References: <>
> > > Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> > > Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
> > >
> > > Hi Mike,
> > >
> > > We are no doubt distantly related! My family's oral tradition was
> > > that a number of Suggs brothers (5 or 7, depending on who tells
> > > the story) left NC/SC and headed west. Some stopped in Tennessee,
> > > some headed south from TN to Florida, and some headed to Texas.
> > >
> > > >From everything I've gotten off of the internet (mostly the work
> > > of other genealogists), The Suggs family came to Virginia as
> > > indentured servants from Bristol, England in 1665. The family had
> > > plantations within 20 yrs, and expanded southward. Around 1830 or
> > > so, several Suggs left the NC/SC area for West Georgia and the
> > > land lottery there. My own great grandfather was born in Alabama,
> > > and moved to North Florida in the 1880s. We've been here every
> > > since.
> > >
> > > Scott Trimble has done some tremendous work tracing the early
> > > family tree. He's in California (perhaps a relative of yours).
> > > You can find him online with a web search, or just put in "Suggs
> > > Genealogy" in your google search engine, and one of his web pages
> > > will pop up.
> > >
> > > Thanks for writing, and I'm so glad you enjoy Wooden Boat. I'm
> > > currently working on a new CD for late Spring release. Check my
> > > website periodically if you're interested.
> > >
> > > Keep in touch, and Happy Holidays to you, cousin...
> > >
> > > -=Del Suggs=-
> > >
> > > http://www.SaltwaterMusic.com
> > >
> > > (Here is something I drafted for my own family reunion a couple of
> > > years ago. I hope you find it useful)
> > >
> > > The Suggs Family History
> > >
> > > The Suggs family name represents a long and distinguished
> > > heritage. The name is of British (Saxon) origin, and comes from a
> > > time when surnames generally came from one of four sources:
> > > occupation (i.e., Smith or Cooper), location (i.e.,West or Brook),
> > > father's name (i.e., Johnson) and personal characteristics (i.e.,
> > > White or Golden).
> > >
> > > The Suggs surname appears to be locational in origin. Suggs and
> > > its variations Sug, Sugg, Suges Sugger and Sugs are thought to be
> > > an early Saxon English term for "dweller at the sign of the sow."
> > > There are other sources, however, that suggest Suggs may actually
> > > refer to a small bird such as a wren or sparrow. The Old English
> > > word "sucgra" and the Middle English "sugge," meaning a bird, and
> > > hegesugge (a hedge-sparrow). For that reason, there is some
> > > speculation that the Suggs family could be distantly related to
> > > those with the last name of Byrd or Bird. BIRD is a synonym of
> > > the name and is a common surname today in England; Sugge was once
> > > very numerous but is rare today. The name, therefore, is 900
> > > years old.
> > >
> > > Following the invasion of Great Britain by the Normans and the
> > > Battle of Hastings in 1066 AD, the famous William the Conqueror
> > > ordered a census of the newly acquired territory. This inventory
> > > would include everyone "from now until Doomsday," and is therefore
> > > referred to as the Doomsday Book. There are several Suggs, Suges
> > > and Sugg listings in this early census.
> > >
> > > The earliest land record is perhaps that of Hamon Sugg, owning 34
> > > measures of land near Ripon, Yorkshire. In 1234 A.D. we find
> > > Edward Sugg, Lord of the Manor of Loughborough Co. Leicester. At
> > > Witney, Oxfordshire, Stephen Sugg in 1310 held 88 acres, and
> > > supplied 15 men-at-arms to his overlord, Baron Piercy.
> > >
> > > In 1354 A.D., Pieter Sugg of Winchester was granted a Coat of
> > > Arms, and owned large estates. Land lists of 1400 A.D. show:
> > > Alexander Sugg, 137 acres, Bury St. Edmunds Suffolk, 1388; Philip
> > > Sugg, 238 acres, Macclesfield, Cheshire, 1392; Willem Sugg, 129
> > > acres, Braintree, Essex, 1398.
> > >
> > > Sir Richard Sugg, knighted by Richard II, was granted lands at
> > > Brecon, Wales, in 1378.
> > > Land records show that there were Sugg branches in the Welsh
> > > counties of Carmarthen, Pembroke, Denbigh, Monmouth, Radnor, in
> > > the 1200s A.D.
> > >
> > > In the 1500s, Gen. Hugh Sugg was famed for military successes
> > > against the Spaniards; his father had been Lord Chancellor under
> > > Elizabeth I. Ecclesiastical records show: Sarah Sugg donated 300
> > > pounds to St. John's, Wilby, Northamptonshire; John Sugg gave 482
> > > pounds to monastery at Leominster, Hereford, 1512. Marriage
> > > License statistics for Exeter Diocese show: Edwd. Sugg m. Isabella
> > > Perkins, March 7, 1500; John Sugg married Elizabeth Boorman, April
> > > 14; Isaac Sugg m. Maria Trammel, Feb. 11; Edmund Sugg m. Sophia
> > > Chelders, June 24; Arthur Sugg m. Jane Mitten, Nov. 21.
> > >
> > > Further abstracts (landed Gentry & Ecclesiast. Guides) show: Luke
> > > Sugg, Prior, Buckfast Abbey, Devon, 1529; Daniel Sugg, bishop of
> > > Wells, Somerset, 1588; Sir John Sugg created Baronet for personal
> > > and military services to King Charles II, 1660; Admiral Francis
> > > Sugg defeated Dutch Fleets on five occasions (in 1700s). From
> > > 1700-1800 Sugg branches owned a total of 899 acres in Essex,
> > > Lincoln, Gloucester, Dorset, Merioneth.
> > >
> > > During the English Civil War of the mid 1600's, the Suggs family
> > > lived in and around Bristol, England. In 1665, William Sugg left
> > > his homeland for the American Colonies, settling in Norfolk,
> > > Virginia. Records show he came to America as an "indentured
> > > servant," a common means for obtaining transit to the New World.
> > > Someone wishing to come to America would agree to work for a
> > > certain length of time (2-3 years) in exchange for transportation,
> > > room and board. Such servitude was recorded in public records,
> > > and the servant would be freed upon completion of the debt.
> > > William apparently indentured himself to his father-in-law.
> > >
> > > After working off his indenture, William Sugg started a plantation
> > > in Virginia, and became a successful landowner and planter. There
> > > are numerous records of his real estate transactions, buying and
> > > selling property. He had three sons.
> > >
> > > There is also a possibility-- although distant and difficult to
> > > prove-- that one of William's decendants married a decendant of
> > > the actual indian Pocahontas.
> > >
> > > Within a couple of generations, the Sugg family had moved into
> > > North Carolina, where they stayed for the next hundred years.
> > > Johnston County, NC records show James Sugg born in 1764 to
> > > Absolom Sugg and his wife Vinil Bunn. James and his wife
> > > Elizabeth Best had seven children. It was their children who
> > > added the "s" on the end, changing the surname to "Suggs."
> > >
> > > Lt. George Suggs (1761-1825) was a 1st Lt. in the Rev. War. He
> > > was born in 1761 or earlier (possibly 1758) in Norfolk Co., VA and
> > > died 11/1/1825. He is buried in Mill Creek Cemetery, Rt. 274,
> > > York Co., SC and was married to Mary Katharine Sanders who died
> > > 7/28/1809 at the age of 43. She is also buried in Mill Creek
> > > Cemetery. Source on this info is Colonial Records of NC, History
> > > of Indian Territory, p. 518.
> > >
> > > The Suggs were living in southern North Carolina in 1800, around
> > > Robeson County. Even today, maps reflect the impact of the Suggs'
> > > on the area around Fayetteville. There is, for example, a body of
> > > water named the Suggs Mill Pond, suggesting a lumber or grain
> > > processing operation.
> > >
> > > The area around Robeson County, NC also supported a native
> > > population of Lumbee indians. These indians were virtually
> > > indistinguishable from european settlers. They had gray eyes,
> > > spoke english, and lived in houses, although they had native
> > > names, such as Bullard. Willis Suggs, son of James and Elizabeth,
> > > married a Lumbee indian woman named Deidany Bullard.
> > >
> > > In 1830, there was a dispute among the congregation of the Ashpole
> > > Swamp Baptist Church in Robeson County. The church divided among
> > > itself, and decided to expell the Lumbee indian members. Willis,
> > > his bride Deidany, his father James, brother Josiah, and other
> > > family members left North Carolina for southwest Georgia.
> > > Following the removal of the Native Americans, the former indian
> > > territory and Creek Nation land in Georgia was made available for
> > > settlement through a land lottery.
> > >
> > > One branch of the Suggs family settled in Sumter County
> > > (Americus), Georgia. In the 1850 census, there are nine children
> > > listed in the household of Willis and Deidany, seven boys and two
> > > girls. Several of these sons served in the Confederate Army. At
> > > least one, William, died in a Confederate hospital of his
> > > wounds. The others are listed on the surrender list at Appomatox
> > > Courthouse, Virginia, when Gen. Robert E. Lee signed a truce with
> > > Gen U.S. Grant in 1865 ending the War of Northern Agression.
> > >
> > > There is also an indication that part of the Suggs family headed
> > > even further west, and settled first in Mississippi and then in
> > > Texas. One part of the Suggs Family oral history tells of several
> > > Suggs brothers heading west from Carolina to the area around
> > > Nashville. At that juncture, some brothers headed south to
> > > Alabama and Florida, and others headed to Texas. Author Larry
> > > McMurtry pays tribute to the notorious "Suggs Gang" in his famous
> > > novel Lonesome Dove.
> > >
> > > One branch of the Suggs family settled in Alabama. There is small
> > > town just west of Monroeville called Suggsville in Clarke County,
> > > AL. At one time, it was an important stopover for the mail run,
> > > and was a rail terminal. There is also a rather famous fictional
> > > character named Capt Simon Suggs, a rather lovable if disreputable
> > > con-man who was created by Johnson Jones Hooper in the 1840's.
> > > Some of the Simon Suggs stories are said to have inspired-- if not
> > > stolen by-- Mark Twain in his writing of Huck Finn. The books
> > > have recently been republished by the University of Alabama Press.
> > >
> > > The 1900 Florida Census Roll T 1039-46 Jackson County lists the
> > > following household:
> > > Lewis Suggs, age 50, born in Alabama
> > > Mary E. Suggs, his wife
> > > and sons Hillard Suggs, 20, and
> > > Willie Suggs, 15.
> > >
> > > "Hillard" is most likely Hilliard, and Willie would have been
> > > William Everett Suggs. Perhaps his middle name Everett came from
> > > his mother, whom we know only as "Mary E." Census takers then (as
> > > now) were not highly trained, nor well educated. They were often
> > > practically illiterate, and being itinerate, often had problems
> > > understanding the "southern accent." Also, they would sometimes
> > > simple gather census information from whoever answered the door or
> > > whoever wasn't working in the fields, which would likely be small
> > > children. Therefore, there is often a discrepancy in data, with
> > > misspellings, dates, ages, etc.
> > >
> > > The 1910 Florida Census roll T 1262-64 Jackson County lists the
> > > following household:
> > > William E. Suggs age 22, born in Florida
> > > Rebecca Suggs, his wife, age 23
> > > Annie May
> > > Floyd
> > > Artie
> > > Rex
> > > Hillery, age 30 born in Florida
> > >
> > > Again, given the problems with census takers, Hillery is most
> > > certainly Hilliard, and "Artie" is most certainly "Carter."
> > >
> > > Also listed in the 1900 Census for Jackson County was the
> > > following household:
> > > Sam J. Suggs age 28
> > > Allice Suggs age 21
> > > Vassie D. Suggs age 5
> > > Rosie, age 1
> > > Elias Suggs, born 1839 in NC, and
> > > his daughter Polly (born 1872 in Alabama).
> > >
> > > It is entirely possible that Lewis and Elias are brothers. We can
> > > speculate that Elias and his parents moved from North Carolina or
> > > Georgia to Alabama between 1840 and Lewis' birth about 1850.
> > > Lewis Suggs was settled in Florida by 1880 when Hilliard was born.
> > >
> > > Although the documentation is not conclusive, there is some
> > > evidence that these branches of the Suggs family remained in
> > > contact through the beginning of this century. Hilliard Suggs
> > > moved to Groveland, Texas in the 1910's to join with other
> > > relatives. Annie Mae Suggs Brookins traveled by train to visit
> > > her Uncle Hilliard there in the 1930's.
> > >
> > > And note the further evidence of familial contact: Charles
> > > Fletcher Suggs, born in 1867 in Terrell County, Georgia, was son
> > > of Jackson Suggs and the grandson of Willis and Deidany Suggs. (He
> > > was killed in a tragic hunting accident when apparently fell from
> > > his horse and discharged his gun into his chest.) Charles
> > > Fletcher and his wife Mollie had six children in Georgia,
> > > including Annie Mae Suggs (1891-1963).
> > >
> > > Another of Jackson's sons, Asbery Jackson Suggs (b. 1865), had a
> > > son named-- Delmar Cecil Suggs.
> > >
> > > To date, there is not specific evidence linking the Lewis-William
> > > Everett Suggs branch with Jackson Suggs, nor his parents Willis
> > > and Deidany Suggs. But the use of uncommon names such as Annie
> > > Mae and Delmar Cecil would suggest that there is a connection.
> > > Perhaps "our" Annie Mae and D.C. were named for these relatives,
> > > or maybe they were all named for an earlier predecessor. Perhaps
> > > Lewis was the son of one of the Suggs Brothers who left NC for
> > > Tennessee and then Alabama, Florida, and Texas.
> > >
> > > ####
> > > Sources:
> > > Halbert's Inc., genealogy and coat-of-arms dealers, Bath, Ohio.
> > > James Warren Suggs, Jr., Atlanta, GA
> > > James Warren Suggs, III, Fairhope, AL
> > > Gayle Bailey Suggs, Atlanta, GA
> > > Scott T.S. Trimble, Berkley, CA
> > > Univ of California/Berkley genealogy archives
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > --WebTV-Mail-18428-3604--
> > >
> > >
> > > ==== SUGGS Mailing List ====
> > > Visit the Horry County (SC) Historical Society Web Site at:
> > > http://www.hchsonline.org/
> > >
> >
> >
> > ==== SUGGS Mailing List ====
> > Visit the Columbus County, NC GenWeb Site at:
> > http://www.spiritdesign.net/columbus/index.htm
> >
> >
>
>
> ==== SUGGS Mailing List ====
> SUGG/SUGGS Surname Resources (Pt. 2):
> http://www.conleycorp.com/genweb/FamilyTies/FamilyTies.html
> http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Meadows/2656/fam00577.htm
>

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